Here & Now

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Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

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NPR Story
2:06 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

A Visit With Renowned Composer John Harbison

John Harbison is pictured at his home in Cambridge, Mass. (Robin Young/Here & Now)

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 5:22 pm

In 2004, Pulitzer Prize-winning American composer John Harbison released “Songs America Loves To Sing – Old and New Music for Winds, Strings and Piano,” a compilation of recognizable choral preludes with a twist putting the spotlight on the true meanings of the work. It includes hymns like “What a Friend We Have in Jesus” and classics such as “Anniversary Song” — which we know as “Happy Birthday.”

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NPR Story
2:04 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

George W. Bush The Artist Makes His Formal Debut

Portraits of world leaders which are part of the exhibit "The Art of Leadership: A President's Diplomacy," are on display at the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum in Dallas, Friday, April 4, 2014. The exhibit of portraits painted by former President George W. Bush opens Saturday and runs through June 3. (Benny Snyder/AP)

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 5:22 pm

Former President George W. Bush has found painting as his new passion to fill the void in his life after he left the White House.

In an interview on NBC’s “Today” show, Bush tells his daughter, Jenna Bush Hager, “I paint a lot because, as you know, I’m a driven person.”

The occasion was to highlight his portraits of world leaders, which he displays at his library in Texas.

One is of a grim-looking President Vladimir Putin.

Bush says “I got to know him very well. It became more intense as time went on.”

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NPR Story
2:04 pm
Fri April 4, 2014

Earthquake Fear Rises In California

A picture taken on January 19, 1994 in Los Angeles shows a bulldozer tearing down a section of the Santa Monica Freeway that collapsed during the massive Northridge earthquake. A huge earthquake this week in Chile and two minor quakes in California are raising concerns if California is prepared in the even of another major earthquake.(Timothy A. Clary/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 5:22 pm

Geologists say this week’s huge earthquake in Chile is not directly related to two smaller Los Angeles-area earthquakes and one that struck off the Northern California coast recently, even though California has gone for an unusually long time without a significant quake.

In 1989, the Loma Prieta earthquake in San Francisco killed 63 and injured more than 3,700 people. In 1994, the Northridge earthquake in Los Angeles killed 57 people and injured more than 5,000.

Is California ready for the next big one?

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NPR Story
1:45 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Looking At The Legacy Of Kurt Cobain

Kurt Cobain of Nirvana during the taping of MTV Unplugged at Sony Studios in New York City, November 18, 1993. On the 20 year anniversary of Cobain's death and with Nirvana about to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, we look back on Cobain's lasting legacy. (Frank Micelotta/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 1:27 pm

It’s been 20 years since Kurt Cobain, leader of the rock band Nirvana, committed suicide. It was April 5, 1994, and his death left a legion of fans grieving his loss. But according to a new book, Cobain lives on in Nirvana’s music, and you can still see his spirit in culture and fashion. So with Nirvana about to be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame next week, Cobain biographer Charles Cross joins Here & Now’s Robin Young to talk about the Nirvana frontman’s legacy.

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NPR Story
1:44 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Long-Term Unemployed Face Tough Odds Of Getting New Jobs

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 1:45 pm

The Labor Department releases March jobs numbers tomorrow. Economists expect relatively good news with payrolls expected to rise by 200,000 in March.

But the outlook for the long-term unemployed is still murky. A recent Brookings Institution paper found that only 11 percent of the long-term unemployed find work again a year later.

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NPR Story
1:44 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

Don't Try This At Home: Whales Set New Breath-Hold Record

Satellite tag being attached to the dorsal fin of a Cuvier's beaked whale. The tagging arrow can be seen in the air as it detaches from the tag. (Erin Falcone/Cascadia Research under NOAA permit 16111)

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 1:45 pm

Researchers have documented a new breath hold record among mammals. They timed a dive by a whale off the coast of California that lasted two hours and 17 minutes.

To gather the initial results, which were published in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS One, the researchers used barbed darts to attach temporary dive recorders to the dorsal fins of eight whales. The satellite-linked tags were made by a Redmond, Washington company, Wildlife Computers.

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Here & Now
1:40 pm
Thu April 3, 2014

AP: U.S. Agency Created 'Cuban Twitter' To Stir Political Unrest

Students gather behind a business looking for a Internet signal for their smart phones in Havana, Cuba, on April 1. The U.S. Agency for International Development masterminded the creation of a "Cuban Twitter," a communications network designed to undermine the communist government in Cuba, built with secret shell companies and financed through foreign banks, The Associated Press has learned. (Ramon Espinosa/AP Photo)

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 1:45 pm

An Associated Press investigation released today reveals that the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) created a Twitter-like company in Cuba. The goal was to undermine the Cuban government by giving disgruntled citizens the tools to more easily organize and communicate.

The company, called Zunzuneo, gradually grew to include more than 40,000 Cuban subscribers who had no idea their messages were being monitored and their personal data was being gathered by the U.S. government.

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Here & Now
5:06 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Deadline For ATMs Approaching As Microsoft Ends XP Support

(ThinkPanama.com/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 1:51 pm

On April 8th, Microsoft is ending tech support for Windows XP. That means banks and some private vendors are under pressure to upgrade their ATMs or their systems may be more vulnerable.

Ninety-five percent of the world’s ATMs run Windows XP and upgrading is an expensive proposition. It not only entails changing the operating system but adding new hardware on each ATM, too.

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Science & Health
4:58 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Why The Doctor's Always Late

Dr. Gearhart and Catrena Drake update the day's appointments, marking which patients have arrived and which patients are still waiting to be seen. (Lindsay Lazarski/WHYY)

Originally published on Wed April 2, 2014 1:51 pm

Patients wait an average of about 20 minutes at doctors’ offices, according to national data from healthcare consultants. It’s a major annoyance for patients who are stuck leafing through dated magazines, and worrying about work piling up on their desks.

What’s the hold-up? What’s happening behind that waiting room door?

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NPR Story
1:51 pm
Wed April 2, 2014

Acceptance Letters In Hand, Students Wonder How To Pay

(silversnake852/Flickr)

It’s that time of year again — when college acceptance (and rejection) letters find their way into the hands of nervous high school seniors. But that’s the easy part. Exponentially more complicated is figuring out how to pay.

The average cost of four-year-private college in 2013 was $30,094. The sticker price at in-state public colleges is close to $9,000 or $22,000, if you’re coming from out of state. And those jaw-dropping estimates don’t include room and board, books or even an apple to give the teacher.

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