Election 2012

Follow 89.9 WWNO and NPR News on the road to Election Day with this mix of local and national stories.

Live Election Coverage Begins Tuesday, Nov. 6 at 7 p.m.


As the polls close on the East Coast, WWNO and NPR's Election Night Coverage begins at 7 p.m. All Things Considered's Robert Siegel and Melissa Block will be joined by NPR Contributors E.J. Dionne of The Washington Post and the Brookings Institution and Matt Continetti of the Washington Free Beacon. Andrew Kohut and Michael Dimock of the Pew Research Center will have exit poll analysis.

NPR's Ari Shapiro will report from the Mitt Romney's  election night event and Scott Horsley will be at President Obama's election night event. NPR reporters and producers will be stationed with candidates and at state party headquarters nationwide, bringing the results and mood from key electoral states and Congressional, Senate, and Gubernatorial races.

Locally, WWNO's Jack Hopke will be joined by Errol Laborde, producer of WYES' Informed Sources and editor of New Orleans Magazine. Listen for local election updates on the hour and half-hour from 7 - 10 p.m.

Republican Gov. Bobby Jindal is congratulating President Barack Obama for his re-election victory, while saying that won't change his course in Louisiana.

Jindal issued a statement that said, "Here in Louisiana, we will continue to do what we have always done, and that means standing up for our people and doing what we think is right no matter who is president."

Louisiana's governor campaigned across the country for unsuccessful GOP presidential nominee Mitt Romney, who Jindal also congratulated for running a "strong race."

Campaigns continue until December in Louisiana

Nov 8, 2012

As the nation shifts from election debates to governing discussions, the campaign season hasn't wrapped up in Louisiana.

Several races around the state are headed into a Dec. 8 runoff after this week's election.

At the top of the list is the 3rd Congressional District race, where the nasty fight between Republicans Charles Boustany and Jeff Landry will continue through the Thanksgiving holidays. The two men had largely ignored their opponents and acted like it was a two-man race since August.

Voters around Louisiana may be sharply divided on many issues, but not on term limits for local school boards.

With Tuesday's vote, school board members across all of Louisiana's public school districts will be limited to three consecutive four-year terms.

Proposals to enact term limits on the boards passed overwhelmingly, winning easily in all 67 school districts where they were on the ballot. The term limit provision passed with at least 70 percent support in each district.

Louisiana state troopers who volunteered to help New Jersey police after Hurricane Sandy were able to vote absentee, by fax.

A convoy of 25 troopers left Louisiana about 3 a.m. Sunday on the 1,300-mile drive to New Jersey.

Capt. Doug Cain, a state police spokesman, says state police commanders asked Secretary of State Tom Schedler to find a way the troopers could vote absentee. He talked to Attorney General Buddy Caldwell's office and to voter registrars in the troopers' home parishes.

NPR.org's Scott Neuman wrote earlier about how "a mixture of demographics, superior organization and a few tactical missteps from Republicans" helped President Obama win the battleground states.

From this morning's post-election analyses of the presidential campaign, here are three more looks at why Obama was re-elected Tuesday:



Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep, with congratulations to Lance Gilman. He's a newly elected member of the county commission in Storey County, Nevada. Mr. Gilman is a business owner, who won 62 percent of the vote. But as he takes office, Gilman is unlikely to be one of those people who disparages politics by, say, comparing it to a brothel, because Gilman runs a legal brothel, one of the most famous in the country: Nevada's Mustang Ranch. You're listening to MORNING EDITION. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.



This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.


And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

House Speaker John Boehner says he's ready to work with President Obama on a looming fiscal problem. Republicans kept control of the House on Tuesday, though they also lost seats. Now they have weeks to negotiate over the scheduled higher tax rates and spending cuts known as the fiscal cliff.

Although voting problems in Tuesday's election were fewer than some people had expected, there were extremely long lines at many polling sites; so many that President Obama noted them in his victory speech.

"I want to thank every American who participated in this election, whether you voted for the very first time, or waited in line for a very long time," he said, adding, "by the way we have to fix that."

President Obama's re-election and the retention of a Democratic majority in the Senate means the likelihood of a repeal of the Affordable Care Act has receded.

So what now?

"The law is here and we should at this point expect it to still be here Jan. 1, 2014," says Alan Weil, executive director of the nonpartisan National Academy for State Health Policy.

Louisiana voters have approved a constitutional amendment to strengthen already strong gun possession rights in the state.

The amendment eliminates language in the Louisiana Constitution that allows passage of laws prohibiting concealed weapons. It also includes a requirement that any gun restriction laws be held to a tough judicial standard.