Coastal Desk

Southeast Louisiana is sinking under the waves faster than any coastal landscape in the world. With so much at stake for Louisiana and the nation, WWNO has made coastal news a priority.

Since mid-2014 our Coastal Desk reporting team has been producing frequent news reports and in-depth features covering coastal erosion and restoration; hurricane protection; offshore energy and other coastal businesses; wildlife and fisheries impacts; and coastal communities and culture.

Support for the Coastal Desk comes from the Walton Family Foundation, the Greater New Orleans Foundation, and local listeners.

Subscribe to the Coastal Desk as a podcast:

1. Open iTunes

2. Go to the File Menu, click on Subscribe to Podcast…

3. Enter this URL: http://wwno.org/podcasts/70174/rss.xml

And that’s it! New episodes download automatically.

Scripps Institution of Oceanography

WWNO Coastal Reporter Travis Lux and Nola.com | The Times-Picayune Coastal Reporter Tristan Baurick talk about the week in coastal news.

 

This week: The Feds announce they’ll open a historic amount of acreage to offshore drilling, mayoral candidates debate coastal and flooding issues, and the Center for Biological Diversity pushes to protect the Cuvier's beaked whale from the airguns of oil and gas companies.

 

Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana

Mayoral candidates Desiree Charbonnet and Latoya Cantrell discussed water issues at a debate Wednesday night.

 

But it wasn’t much of a debate. Turns out, they actually agree on more than they disagree when it comes to water issues.

David Grunfeld / NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

On this week's installment of the Louisiana coastal roundup, WWNO's Tegan Wendland talked with NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune coastal reporter Sara Sneath about an oil spill near Venice that has been characterized as the largest spill in the U.S. since BP's Macondo well blowout in 2010.

Entergy

Since taking office, the Trump administration has been looking for ways to repeal the Clean Power Plan — the Obama administration's policy to reduce carbon emissions at local power plants.

National Hurricane Center

Hurricane Nate is heading to the Gulf Coast after killing 22 people in Central America. Forecasters say the storm will likely strike the Mississippi Delta around 7 p.m. as a Category 2 hurricane. Residents in several coastal parishes have been ordered to evacuate, and polling stations for early voting sites in some areas are closing ahead of schedule. Louisiana Gov. John Bel Edwards is urging residents to find a safe place behind the flood wall as soon as possible and stay put until Sunday morning.

Jess Clark / WWNO

Evacuations are underway in areas outside of Louisiana's levee system ahead of Tropical Storm Nate. Nate is barreling through the Caribbean on a path towards the Gulf of Mexico. Forecasters say it's likely to grow into a Category 1 hurricane before it slams into the Gulf Coast Saturday night. Residents across New Orleans are making last-minute preparations before the storm hits.

Louisiana's Severe Repetitive Loss Problem

Oct 5, 2017

Properties that flood over and over again are a longstanding problem for FEMA and the National Flood Insurance Program. Around 30,000 of the most frequently flooded homes in the country make up less than a percent of the total insured pool, but pull down around 10 percent of total claim dollars.

Wallis Watkins / WWNO

For 17 years, residents in parts of East Baton Rouge, Ascension and Livingston parishes have been paying a local tax to help fund construction of the Comite River Diversion Canal, designed to lower the flood risk of nearby homeowners. Then in 2016, record flooding hit the region — causing billions in damage. The incident only ignited the demand for answers from frustrated taxpayers.

Tyler Antrup with the city’s Office of Resilience, Loyola law professor Rob Verchick, architect David Waggonner and assistant inspector general Nadiene Van Dyke. It was moderated by history professor Eric Hardy.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board has been under fire since the city’s pumping system failed and caused major flooding in August.  

Travis Lux / WWNO

Floods this summer revealed that New Orleans’ drainage system hasn’t been working at full capacity. Since then, the city has been scrambling to improve the system in a number of ways — from repairing drainage pumps to clearing catch basins on the street.

 

This weekend, the city will teach citizens how to clean catch basins themselves. They’re calling it Adopt-A-Catch Basin.

 

Catch basins are those grated gutters on the sides of the road. When it rains, water flows through those grates before it’s pumped out of the city.

Pages