Coastal Desk

Southeast Louisiana is sinking under the waves faster than any coastal landscape in the world. With so much at stake for Louisiana and the nation, WWNO has made coastal news a priority.

Since mid-2014 our Coastal Desk reporting team has been producing frequent news reports and in-depth features covering coastal erosion and restoration; hurricane protection; offshore energy and other coastal businesses; wildlife and fisheries impacts; and coastal communities and culture.

Support for the Coastal Desk comes from the Walton Family Foundation, the Greater New Orleans Foundation, and local listeners.

Subscribe to the Coastal Desk as a podcast:

1. Open iTunes

2. Go to the File Menu, click on Subscribe to Podcast…

3. Enter this URL: http://wwno.org/podcasts/70174/rss.xml

And that’s it! New episodes download automatically.

Travis Lux / WWNO

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: coastal law. Coastal parishes are suing oil companies, environmental advocates are suing the Army Corps, the Attorney General is also suing the Corps, and there’s been a recent surge in civil lawsuits over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. It's hard to keep it all straight. It seems that in the struggle to come up with funds to fight coastal land loss, officials are turning to litigation.

WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with Chris Dalbom of Tulane’s Institute on Water Resources Law and Policy.

Coastal News Roundup: Nola.com/The Times-Picayune Teams With New York Times On Coastal Reporting

Feb 23, 2018
Listening Coast

This week on the Roundup we hear from the whole team at Nola.com/The Times-Picayune about a big project they just completed that goes to print Saturday. Coastal reporters Mark Schleifstein, Sara Sneath and Tristan Baurick collaborated with The New York Times on a series about the vulnerability of South Louisiana.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Join WWNO's Coastal Desk for a canoe and kayak trip down Cane Bayou on the Northshore!

One of the coolest things about the Louisiana coast is the way it gradually transitions from cypress swamp into open marsh, and you'll see it firsthand on Cane Bayou. The trip will be led by a master naturalist, who will tell us all about the plants, animals and history of this slice of Louisiana's unique coastal ecosystem. 

Travis Lux / WWNO

The weather is warm, Mardi Gras is over and it’s festival season. That means, time for crawfish boils.

 

Despite the slow start to crawfish season, officials held a celebration Tuesday to mark the opening of the season. But for the second year in a row, one crawfish got off a little easy.

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: An update on the bug destroying the bird’s foot marsh, some research from the Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill and Ecosystem Science conference and the environmental consequences of glitter.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Countries across the world are starting to ban some microplastics. Like microbeads — the tiny pieces of plastic used in soap and face washes.

 

This time of year in New Orleans, it’s almost raining plastic, from beads to glitter. Lots of glitter. But what happens to all that sparkly stuff after it washes away? WWNO’s Travis Lux took a look at the environmental consequences of glitter.

Tristan Baurick / Nola.com|The Times-Picayune

The bounty of the Louisiana Coast has helped make New Orleans a food capital. But humans have put the once-plentiful resources — like fish — at risk. 

On this week's coastal news roundup, Nola.com/Times-Picayune environmental reporters Sara Sneath and Tristan Baurick talk about how chefs, fishermen and companies are fighting to keep Louisiana on the food map.

Louisiana State University

LSU unveiled a big, new model of the lower Mississippi River Monday. It will be used to simulate floods and help the state figure out how to use the river to rebuild the coast.

High Contrast / Wikimidia Commons (CC BY 3.0 DE)

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: Louisiana debates bringing a Russian fish and an update on pollution trading. Plus, some dubious claims about alligators.

 

WWNO’s Travis Lux spoke with reporter Tristan Baurick, from Nola.com/The Times Picayune, about the week in coastal news.

Scott Akerman / Flickr (CC BY 2.0)

The Sewerage and Water Board answered questions from New Orleans city council members Tuesday about the impact of last week’s freeze, but the agency is still taking stock.

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