Coastal Desk

Southeast Louisiana is sinking under the waves faster than any coastal landscape in the world. With so much at stake for Louisiana and the nation, WWNO has made coastal news a priority.

Since mid-2014 our Coastal Desk reporting team has been producing frequent news reports and in-depth features covering coastal erosion and restoration; hurricane protection; offshore energy and other coastal businesses; wildlife and fisheries impacts; and coastal communities and culture.

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Sue Lincoln / WRKF

Tropical Storm Harvey is expected to make yet another landfall tomorrow morning. This time in Southwest Louisiana.

 

Over the last few days, Harvey has dropped more than 20 inches of rain on parts of Southwest Louisiana. Five hundred people were rescued in the Lake Charles area Monday night due to flooding.

 

People march in a previous second line to commemorate Hurricane Katrina. Tropical Storm Harvey forced event organizers to postpone this year's event.
Courtesy of 12th Annual Katrina Second Line Rally

Tuesday marks 12 years since Hurricane Katrina smashed into New Orleans and the Gulf Coast, bringing destruction and taking more than 1,500 lives in Louisiana alone. Communities in the Ninth Ward had planned to mark the day with a second line Tuesday morning, but rain from Tropical Storm Harvey forced them to postpone the event.

Jim Bowie / Adobe Stock

Editor's Note: See the latest news and updates on Harvey.

As Louisiana braces for heavy rain from Tropical Storm Harvey, officials in New Orleans announced that one of the city’s drainage pumps is being repaired — after a motor caught fire Monday.

The announcement from Mayor Mitch Landrieu came after 4 inches of rain earlier in the day caused street flooding in neighborhoods across the city. 

Resources To Help Hurricane Harvey Victims

Aug 28, 2017

We are gathering resources and links to help connect people with organizations responding to Hurricane Harvey and its aftermath. This post will be updated.

www.nhc.noaa.gov

New Orleans is bracing for the heavy rains generated by Hurricane Harvey with a pumping system that is still not fully operational.

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu held a press conference today, saying he's confident the pumps will handle the deluge. He says crews have been working 24-hours a day to repair pumps that failed during heavy rain earlier this month. Some neighborhoods sustained several feet of standing water. He says the system is now operating at 92 percent.

Travis Lux / WWNO

New Orleans is in a waiting game as the Gulf Coast braces for Hurricane Harvey to make landfall in Texas Friday night. City officials have not called for evacuations, but coastal parishes are under flood advisories. Vermillion Parish has called for voluntary evacuations and parts of Cameron Parish are under mandatory evacuation.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Under overcast skies, officials are urging caution, not panic, ahead of heavy weekend rains. The city has been on-edge since failures of the pumping system contributed to widespread flooding on Aug. 5.

Since then, some public officials have been fired— and some, but not all, of the pumps have been fixed.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu says the city remains vulnerable.

Della Hasselle

Traumatic experiences like major floods can have psychological ramifications. Since Hurricane Katrina, FEMA has sent money to Louisiana to provide counseling for survivors struggling with poor mental health every time a disaster hits the state.

A program called Louisiana Spirit has been providing that service to victims near Baton Rouge since the floods last August. But as the one-year anniversary approaches, the program is winding down — leaving some victims in the lurch.

Kmusser / Creative Commons

Since rainfall blanketed southeast Louisiana in August 2016, residents have wondered how the state can protect its people from future floods. Answering that question begins with understanding the geography we live in.

Flood Recovery: Not-So-Rapid Rehousing

Aug 15, 2017
Molly Peterson

Federal aid helped pay for hotels for thousands of Louisianans after last year's flood. Until May, the short-term program help people find shelter, especially low-income renters. Now a state-managed program is still filling in the gaps, trying to give more permanent homes to families washed out last year — including a single mother in Baton Rouge.

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