Coastal Desk

Southeast Louisiana is sinking under the waves faster than any coastal landscape in the world. With so much at stake for Louisiana and the nation, WWNO has made coastal news a priority.

Since mid-2014 our Coastal Desk reporting team has been producing frequent news reports and in-depth features covering coastal erosion and restoration; hurricane protection; offshore energy and other coastal businesses; wildlife and fisheries impacts; and coastal communities and culture.

Support for the Coastal Desk comes from the Walton Family Foundation, the Coypu Foundation, the Greater New Orleans Foundation, and local listeners.

Subscribe to the Coastal Desk as a podcast:

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2. Go to the File Menu, click on Subscribe to Podcast…

3. Enter this URL: http://wwno.org/podcasts/70174/rss.xml

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Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Louisiana’s governor, John Bel Edwards, was in Washington DC last week lobbying Congress to approve a disaster aid package of nearly $3 billion to help with flood relief. Part of that would go to help small businesses recover. In addition to more than 140,000 homes, nearly 7,000 businesses were flooded-out.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

As people in cities and towns across Louisiana continue the ongoing cleanup of flood-damaged buildings and homes, farmers face another set of problems. Many corn, soybean, sugar and rice farmers in the southern part of the state had their fields flooded with several feet of water. Now they are trying to figure out what comes next.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Sea level rise and land loss is affecting communities all over the world, not just in Louisiana. But Louisiana has one of the first communities that will be entirely resettled as a result: the Isle de Jean Charles.

  

 


Floods Disrupt Louisiana's School Schedule

Sep 1, 2016

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

In Louisiana's second-largest school district, all the schools are closed because of the massive flooding there. Students in the East Baton Rouge Parish were scheduled to go back this week. But the district had to delay the start of school until after Labor Day. Mallory Falk from member station WWNO reports.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

On this eleventh anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, officials gathered to remember the dead. As WWNO’s Tegan Wendland reports, they held a prayer service and wreath-laying ceremony. This year’s memorial feels especially poignant, as parishes across southern Louisiana reel from devastating floods.

Debris lines the streets of Denham Springs, Louisiana after severe flooding
Ryan Kailath / WWNO

Tallying the fallout of the recent flooding in South Louisiana may take weeks or months. Beyond property damage to homes and businesses, there are also environmental costs—which some watchdog groups are measuring on their own.

 

 


Common Dreams

Tens of thousands in Louisiana were surprised by floods last week. In a changing climate, what more can be done to warn communities that the weather can do things they aren't used to?

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

The Army Corps of Engineers is planning to temporarily close down some areas of The Fly, a popular Uptown park on the levee by Audubon Park, for a much-needed upgrade. The Corps will hold a public input meeting about the project at 6:00pm Thursday at the Audubon Nature Institute.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

New Orleans’ streets drew national attention this spring after a giant sinkhole opened up downtown during JazzFest. Since then, several more holes have made it into local news - in Uptown and Mid city.

New Orleanians are used to complaining about persistent potholes in all parts of the city - but, sinkholes are a different animal.

Ryan Kailath / WWNO

Tourism has long been a part of the culture of New Orleans, but more people are visiting the state’s swamps and bayous than ever before.

In Blind River, one local woman’s expression of faith has become an attraction - one that her family keeps going.

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