All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city. Hosted by Jack Hopke.

This week on All Things New Orleans, host Jack Hopke speaks with Maxwell Williams, the new artistic director of Le Petit Théâtre du Vieux Carré.

Then producer Laine Kaplan-Levenson takes us to the streets of the Marigny for a second line honoring audio engineer Bill Deputy.

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Last Sunday, longtime sound engineer Bill Deputy died of lung cancer at the age of 58. Deputy served as All Things Considered’s technical director for many years, and traveled all over the world capturing sound, including the first Mardi Gras after Hurricane Katrina in 2006.

M.S. Rau Antiques

A collection of paintings depicting women in art is opening this weekend at M.S. Rau Antiques in the French Quarter. Eileen Fleming got a preview of the images ranging from a Norman Rockwell cover of a World War One ingénue to a Renaissance Madonna and Child.

The show is called “Innocence, Temptation and Power: The Evolution of Women in Art.” It brings together more than 40 works from the world’s great artists – like Picasso, Renoir and Rockwell.

Owner William Rau says it highlights one of his own great interests.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

 

Michael "Quess?" Moore is an instructional coach at Martin Behrman Charter School. He helps teachers from all grade levels – kindergarten through eighth – develop lesson plans. Sometimes he co-leads the lessons, and sometimes he teaches them on his own. In the classroom, Moore draws on his experience as a spoken word artist.

Support for Voices of Educators and education reporting on WWNO comes from Entergy Corporation.

On a sunny Sunday in New Orleans, barbecue stands and ice-filled coolers line a closed-off street. Central City is not a tourist zone, but people pack in — many with cameras and long lenses. A mass of color begins to move.

Emily Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

Last weekend, Spring Break vibes descended upon the riverfront in the form of neon, midriffs and pounding bass. The BUKU Music and Art Project swarmed Mardi Gras World with big names like STS9, TV On the Radio, and A$AP Rocky, and more underground acts like Run the Jewels and Odesza, for a mostly collegiate (and younger) crowd to rejoice in. 

Nola.com The Times-Picayune Archive

Every month WWNO talks to Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com. In this edition the Professor of Geography at the Tulane School of Architecture delves into the former Chinatown, and the history of Chinese-Americans in the city.

Chinese immigrants were first brought to Louisiana in hopes that they would work as inexpensive labor for sugar plantations after the Civil War. When that didn't work out, they began to move to the city.

Ian McNulty

At the intersection of St. Patrick's Day and St. Joseph's Day in New Orleans, food-centric celebrations abound, but so do some unique hazards for the unwary.


Professor John Renne of UNO Planning and Urban Studies has more on the Front Yard Initiative, a pilot program to help homeowners turn concrete into green space. The idea, he says, has social, environmental and property value impact.

New Orleans is known for its enormous Vietnamese population, one of the largest in the country. But we recently came across a story about a now-lost Chinatown in New Orleans — two of them, in fact — and how they came to be. To understand how these hubs came about, and why they disappeared, we have to rewind the clock 150 years, to the end of the Civil War.

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