All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city. Hosted by Jack Hopke.

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Coastal Desk
9:11 am
Mon April 20, 2015

A million dead birds and five years later, scientists still struggling to assess BP spill's impact

Brown Pelicans nesting on an island in Cat Bay. Scientists are still charting the impact of the 2010 BP oil spill on birds in South Louisiana.
Credit Erin Krall / WWNO

Five years ago on April 20, the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded off the Louisiana coast. Scientists are still studying the effects of more than 3 million barrels of oil that a federal court determined gushed into the Gulf of Mexico. And those evaluating the effects on birds are still unsure what to expect.

Oil-covered pelicans became the icons of what happened when the oil seeped into the marshes on the Louisiana coast. That damage was clear.

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Coastal Desk
7:28 am
Mon April 20, 2015

BP Oil Disaster 5 Years On: An Interview With Former Plaquemines Parish President Billy Nungesser

Billy Nungesser, Former Plaquemines Parish President, speaks to locals at Lil Gs diner in Belle Chasse.
Credit Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Billy Nungesser was the President of Plaquemines Parish five years ago when the BP oil disaster happened. Nungesser’s constituency of around 23,000 residents were some of the hardest hit along the Gulf Coast.

For months after the disaster, Nungesser was a constant presence on national television, taking on both industry and government officials over their handling of the spill and cleanup.

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Coastal Desk
9:23 am
Sun April 19, 2015

Five Years After The BP Oil Disaster Is It Safer To Work Offshore?

Oil workers practice fire fighting at the Fletcher Technical Community College in Houma.
Credit Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Five years ago an off-shore explosion killed 11 workers and created a massive 210 million gallon spill in the Gulf of Mexico. There have been questions ever since about how the accident could have been prevented and how to improve off-shore safety standards.

Carl Moore started working on off-shore supply boats back in the 1980s.

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Education
7:03 am
Sat April 18, 2015

Falling Through The Cracks: Young Lives Adrift In New Orleans

Craig Adams, Jr., 18, is studying for his second try at the high school equivalency exam.
LA Johnson/NPR

Originally published on Mon April 20, 2015 9:37 am

On weekend afternoons, Craig Adams Jr. plays for tourists on the streets of the French Quarter.

He gigs with different bands, bringing whatever's needed: trumpet, trombone, saxophone — he plays six or seven instruments in all. There's a white plastic bucket on the sidewalk so people can drop in cash as they browse the T-shirts and Mardi Gras masks.

Craig is 18, and there's music in his blood: "I had my uncle, my grandfather, and my dad to teach me." His father, Craig Adams Sr., leads a group called the Higher Dimensions of Praise Gospel Band.

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Education
3:34 pm
Fri April 17, 2015

In New Orleans, A Second-Chance School Tries Again

Students arrive at CLA. More than half end up here after being expelled from other schools, usually for fighting, weapons or drugs.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Sat April 18, 2015 7:28 pm

Principal Nicholas Dean looks at his scarred, broken office door with resignation.

"Time to get a new lock," he says.

Over the weekend, a person or persons smashed into his office, found the keys to the school van and drove off in it.

It's another day at Crescent Leadership Academy, one of New Orleans' three second-chance schools for students who have not been successful elsewhere.

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Education
3:57 pm
Thu April 16, 2015

Voices Of Educators: Dr. Kate Kokontis

Dr. Kate Kokontis.
Credit Mallory Falk / WWNO

New Orleans Center for Creative Arts, or NOCCA, has long been known as a leading arts education program. But the staff there began to notice a trend. Students came to NOCCA from schools all over the city and had dramatically different experiences.

"And there were a lot of sad moments at the end of somebody's senior year where they'd be given a scholarship based on their art, or get into a school based on their arts audition, and then not be able to accept it because they weren't admitted academically," says Dr. Kate Kokontis.

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Community
7:08 am
Fri April 10, 2015

Cityscapes: Richard Campanella On A 7th Ward Puzzle

The peculiar pocket of the 7th Ward, unraveled by Richard Campanella.
Nola.com/The Times-Picayune

Each month we talk with Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com and The Times-Picayune. This month the Professor of Geography at the Tulane School of Architecture delves into a bizarre street pattern that pops up in the 7th Ward.

Seen from above, he says, this particular parcel of land and the way its streets intersect looks like the floor of a messy tailor's shop, scraps and remnants rather than any type of clear-cut pattern.

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Where Y'Eat
4:35 pm
Thu April 9, 2015

Visions Of Street Food At French Quarter Fest

Cooking up a unique feast of New Orleans street food at French Quarter Festival.
Ian McNulty

Think New Orleans needs more street food? This weekend's French Quarter Festival is teeming with inspiration for new ideas.

Street food is a term that has a lot of cachet in the dining world these days. I just wish we could get our hands on it a little more.

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Arts & Culture
6:49 am
Wed April 8, 2015

Lost Bayou Ramblers Keep Cajun Culture Alive And Moving Forward

The Lost Bayou Ramblers (left to right) are Eric Heigle, Louis Michot, Korey Richey, Andre Michot, and Jonny Campos.
Denny Culbert

Okay Louisiana: what’s the Cajun band that’s also psychedelic rock, or maybe even a little punk? Hint: they’re from Lafayette, they were started by two brothers 16 years ago, and they’re a huge force behind younger generations embracing Cajun culture. Still not sure? Think: roaming around slow moving water.

In collaboration with Louisiana Cultural Vistas, Eve Abrams brings us this profile of the Lost Bayou Ramblers.

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Education
2:23 am
Tue April 7, 2015

A New Orleans High School Adapts To Unaccompanied Minors

G.W. Carver Preparatory Academy has enrolled more than 50 unaccompanied minors from Central America. Principal Ben Davis says he's spending an extra $2,500 per student for special education services and instructional software tailored for them.
LA Johnson NPR

Originally published on Tue April 7, 2015 2:03 pm

For the past year now, many Americans have been hearing and reading about the 68,000 unaccompanied minors who have crossed illegally into the U.S. Nearly all of these minors come from El Salvador, Guatemala or Honduras, and since their arrival, immigration officials have released most of them to their parents or relatives who already live in this country.

A number of these children and teenagers are in deportation proceedings, but while they wait, they have been allowed to attend public schools. In Louisiana, schools have enrolled nearly 2,000 of them.

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