All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city. Hosted by Jack Hopke.

Ian McNulty / WWNO

As parades roll and people hit the streets for Carnival revelry, street food blossoms everywhere.

Cityscapes: New Orleans Almost Had A Monorail

Feb 4, 2016
Tulane Special Collections

New Orleans has various ways of transportation to get around the city including ferries, streetcars and buses.  However, in 1958 New Orleans planned to create a new form of getting around: a monorail. The idea of creating the monorail came from the city's urge to remain modern and keep up with Houston, which had recently passed New Orleans as the largest city in the region. 

Historic New Orleans Collection

If you kept tabs on local politics over the past several decades, then Jackie Clarkson’s name isn’t lost on you. This staunch Democrat represented many of the city’s downtown neighborhoods from Bywater and Treme to the French Quarter and Algiers, her childhood home.

But what influenced her to pursue a life in politics? Mark Cave found out when he interviewed Ms. Clarkson for this edition of NOLA Life Stories.

Star-Steppin' Cosmonaughties Headed For Funky Times

Jan 27, 2016
Kelley Crawford

When it comes to Mardi Gras, you can never understate the difference between watching a parade and marching in one. The experience is so alluring that it’s no surprise many krewes get bigger and bigger each year. Take for example, The Star-Steppin’ Cosmonaughties: a dancing krewe now in their fifth year, that’s ready for Carnival season with new moves and big surprises.

Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

For the past 50 years, there has been one place you could see, without fail, James Audubon, Marie Laveau, Huey P. Long and Dracula, together in one room.

But time is running out to mingle with Louisiana’s most notable historical figures. The Musée Conti Wax Museum is closing up shop at the end of the month.

Lynn Hatter / WFSU

Florida has become one of the nation’s hot spots for school choice programs. While many ideas may have originated in other states, Florida has adopted them and created a massive alternative system.

WFSU-FM’s Lynn Hatter takes a look at the decades-long movement that is school choice in Florida as part of our series, Matters of Choice.

Students at ReNEW Cultural Arts Academy return to class after a morning "value summit."
Mallory Falk / WWNO

Across the country next week, schools, families and advocacy groups will host events to celebrate National School Choice Week. Most Southern states allow for some form of choice — magnet schools, vouchers for private schools, charter schools and more. How do these options affect learning, school demographics and student success?

Gian Smith On Poetry Charged With Meaning And Intensity

Jan 20, 2016
Gian Smith

Whether it’s on a crowded street corner or in front of his bathroom mirror, Gian Smith practices poetry wherever he can. A teacher by day, Gian is part of the city’s poetry community: a specialized group of artists who prioritize the intimacy of the spoken word.

Mardi Gras was still close to three weeks away. But on Saturday afternoon, Jan. 16, the French Quarter was gridlocked with costumed frolickers, a massive, glittery throng radiating out through the narrow streets from the historic traditional-jazz venue Preservation Hall. The occasion? A parade in memory of David Bowie, led by the Preservation Hall Jazz Band.

WWNO and producer Eve Abrams have launched Unprisoned: Stories From the System, a project exploring criminal justice and corrections in New Orleans, the most incarcerated place in the world.

Abrams sat down with News Director Eve Troeh to explain how people outside of prisons are being affected as profoundly as the people who are incarcerated.

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