All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city. Hosted by Jack Hopke.

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Education
1:25 pm
Thu February 26, 2015

Navigating The New Orleans School Enrollment Process

In the choice landscape, advertisements for charter schools - and the annual Schools Expo - appear on billboards and bus stops.
Credit Mallory Falk / WWNO

Applications to most New Orleans public schools are due this Friday. New Orleans is known as a "choice" landscape. Families apply to schools across the city, instead of automatically sending their children to the neighborhood school. But how much actual choice is there?

It's a Saturday morning and school marching bands play for a crowd. But they're not in a Mardi Gras parade. They're in the Superdome, at a schools expo. There's a bouncy house and a climbing wall. Things to keep kids occupied while their families learn about schools.

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Features
3:03 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

'Rock Star Nurse' Fights Ebola

Yanti Turang is an indie rock singer-turned-nurse and founder of Learn to Live. (learntoliveglobal.org)

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 9:31 am

As the threat of Ebola has left the U.S. and the story has left the headlines, people are still heading over to West Africa to fight the virus that has claimed nearly 10,000 lives.

Yanti Turang is one of those going. The indie rock band singer-turned-nurse and founder of the nonprofit LearnToLive is heading to Sierra Leone to help save lives.

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Community
1:55 pm
Fri February 20, 2015

Cityscapes: When Soil Subsidence Hits Home, Suburban Houses Explode

A 1975 explosion in Metairie, caused by broken gas lines due to soil subsidence.
G. E. Arnold, NOLA.com|The Times-Picayune archive

In this month's Cityscapes column at Nola.com, Tulane Professor of Geography Richard Campanella explores some very real consequences of draining urban wetlands for building.

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Arts & Culture
3:40 pm
Thu February 19, 2015

'Above Canal: Rights and Revival' Explores New Orleans' Civil Rights Legacy And Neighborhood Change

Jeanne Nathan of CANO and Keith Duncan in front of one of Duncan's works, "Times-Picayune," on display at the Myrtle Banks building, 1307 Oretha Castle Haley Blvd., through Feb. 28
Eve Troeh WWNO

The art show “Above Canal: Rights and Revival” honors New Orleans' Civil Rights Movement legacy with archival photos of local actions, activists and leaders. This history is explored alongside contemporary art that speaks to themes of neighborhood change over time.

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Music
2:15 pm
Mon February 16, 2015

A Hero At Home, Deacon John Moore Is New Orleans' Best-Kept Secret

New Orleans bandleader John Moore chose his "Deacon" nickname at the suggestion of a mischievous drummer. At 73, he's one of the city's most beloved musicians.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sun February 15, 2015 1:04 pm

Deacon John does it all. The veteran New Orleans bandleader plays weddings, birthdays, proms, debutante parties. He holds his own at Jazz Fest and at carnival balls. He'll play 1950s R&B, rock, jazz, gospel, soul and disco — whatever the people want to hear. But when it's up to him, he chooses the blues.

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Business & Technology
1:46 pm
Fri February 13, 2015

Can't Find That Mardi Gras Parade? This App Can Help

The WDSU-TV Parade Tracker car in front of Gallier Hall during the 2015 Krewe of Sparta parade.
Credit Jason Saul / WWNO

Mardi Gras season is in full swing. In the last few years, two local television stations have created "parade tracker" smartphone apps to help Mardi Gras revelers identify in real time where they can catch up with the front of a parade.

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Arts & Culture
12:50 pm
Fri February 13, 2015

Everywhere Else It's Just Tuesday: How Do You Explain Mardi Gras?

The 2015 Krewe of Muses.
Credit Jason Saul / WWNO

The final Friday of Mardi Gras is upon us, which means it's time for most New Orleanians to wrap up the final odds and ends at the office, hit the supermarket to stock up, and party their hearts out until Fat Tuesday.

However, some of us have jobs that necessitate interacting with people outside of the Gulf Coast, many of whom, let's face it, just don't understand what in the world is going on down here. For them, Mardi Gras is just another snowy Tuesday.

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Arts & Culture
7:37 am
Fri February 13, 2015

New Orleans Most Talked Of Club: Proudly Westbank, As Other Krewes Relocate To St. Charles Ave.

The Krewe of NOMTOC clubhouse.
Credit Michael Patrick Welch / WWNO

One of the last West Bank krewes, NOMTOC, parades in Algiers this Saturday, February 14. The acronym for this this almost 60-year-old mostly African-American krewe stands for New Orleans Most Talked Of Club.

Michael Patrick Welch spent time with New Orleans Most Talked of Club, for more on their traditions and community.

Few are more excited to ride this Mardi Gras season than the krewe of NOMTOC. NOMTOC, stands for “New Orleans’s Most Talked of Club.” But then you say you’ve never heard of ‘em?

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Community
7:15 am
Fri February 13, 2015

When Cars And Bicycles Fail To Get Along: Look Out For Bike Lash

Bike Easy leads workshops on cyclist safety for all ages.
Bike Easy

Bike lanes and the number of cyclists are growing steadily around New Orleans, and that means the chance for bike-related accidents is growing, too. Crashes, injuries and fatalities remain high. Lots of drivers aren’t used to so many bikers on the road, and many bikers don’t obey the laws.

There’s a name for this type of confusion and the frustration it causes: Bike Lash.

Nina Feldman has the story on why there's confusion about sharing the road in New Orleans, and what to do about it.

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Arts & Culture
11:07 pm
Wed February 11, 2015

Sounds Of Jefferson Variety At Carnival Time

Amber Tucker and Temple Byars dig into the wall of fringe.
Eve Abrams

Carnival means costuming. And for many people, costuming means a visit to Jefferson Variety: the renowned emporium of fabric, feathers, glitter, trim and tassel.

Eve Abrams brings us this sound portrait of the place where Mardi Gras Indians, seamstresses, costumers and anyone in search of the perfect shade of bling finds the materials to make their Carnival visions come true. And in the spirit of Mardi Gras, a disclaimer: this story contains sensitive parts of female anatomy mentioned by name.

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