All Things New Orleans

Thursdays at 1:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.

WWNO’s radio magazine: a weekly half-hour of timely news, cultural features, and commentary from all corners of our city. Hosted by Jack Hopke.

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Coastal Desk
9:29 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

A Tale Of Two Coastal Towns Part 2: Plaquemines Parish

Braithwaite, Louisiana, a town on the East Bank of Plaquemines Parish
Credit Laine Kaplan-Levenson / WWNO

For the first 50 years of his life Donald Stokes lived happily in Braithwaite, a town of a few hundred residents in Plaquemines Parish. In 2006 he and his wife decided to leave.

Stokes says it was such a painful departure that it took him two years to actually complete the move. “Slowly but surely I put stuff on a trailer, came back, put stuff on a trailer, came back. It wasn't easy. It felt like I was uprooting my life.”

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Coastal Desk
9:01 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

A Tale Of Two Coastal Towns Part 1: Staten Island

A Hurricane Sandy damaged house in Staten Island scheduled for demolition.
Credit Elizabeth Rush

Low-lying coastal areas are the front lines for sea level rise, and increasingly frequent and destructive storms at sea. Hurricane Sandy proved it’s not just the South or the Gulf Coast at risk. Staten Island, one of New York City’s five boroughs, saw heavy flooding after Hurricane Sandy, which hit two years ago this month.

The way Eddie Perez tells it, the night of October 29, 2012 played out like one of those movies about the apocalypse. "About 7:55 I was watching the news and they said at 8 o’clock it was coming"

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Arts & Culture
4:40 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

NPR's Michele Norris And Director Kenny Leon Discuss World Premiere of 'Water±' On October 25

Courtesy NPR

NPR's Michele Norris says Hurricane Katrina was a line of demarcation for her. Reporting from New Orleans and the Gulf Coast after the storm and floods, she found herself compelled to work with emotion in her journalism in a new way.

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Food
4:24 pm
Thu October 16, 2014

Where Y'Eat: When Food Trucks Serve More Than Quick Meals

The Crepes a la Cart food truck is among the vendors taking part in the new St. Claude Food Truck Park.
Ian McNulty

A new food truck park offering an offbeat supper option and a glimpse of what’s in store for St. Claude Avenue.

It’s easy to portray food trucks as the renegades of the culinary world. Modern, highly mobile and very much in vogue, they play by different rules than brick-and-mortar restaurants. But around New Orleans lately, these food trucks are increasingly enlisted to serve a number of community causes alongside their street food.

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Food
5:46 pm
Wed October 15, 2014

New Farmers Market Brings Fresh Produce Back to Historic French Market

Visitors shop for fresh produce at the French Market's new weekly Wednesday farmers' market.
Nina Feldman WWNO

On Wednesday afternoon, the Crescent City Farmers’ Market opened in the historic French Market. This is the fourth weekly market that Crescent City Farmers Market operates citywide — but the French Quarter location makes this one different than the rest.

The French Market in New Orleans has been running since 1791. For a couple of centuries, it provided the French Quarter and local community with fresh meats and produce.

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Education
7:30 am
Mon October 13, 2014

Voices Of Educators: Pablo Garcia

Credit Mallory Falk / WWNO

As New Orleans continues to reshape public education, WWNO seeks to highlight teachers who bring unique talents and perspectives to their work. We feature one such educator each month.

Pablo Garcia teaches standard first grade concepts: addition, subtraction, the water cycle. But he does everything in Spanish. Garcia is an immersion instructor at the International School of Louisiana.

Support for Voices of Educators and education news on WWNO comes from Entergy Corporation.

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NOLA Life Stories
5:00 am
Mon October 13, 2014

Rene Brunet Jr.'s Lifetime Serving The Silver Screen

Although they don't own the facility, Rene Brunet Jr.'s family has signed a 50-year agreement with the Prytania Theater that allows them to operate it exclusively.
Credit Historic New Orleans Collection

When Rene Brunet Jr. was a kid, his father owned the Imperial Theater, a single-screen movie house in Mid-City. At the time, movie theaters were neighborhood institutions and played to the vaudeville expectations of the audience. But from the time he was a child, Rene saw the film industry undergo one transformation after another, which put his family’s business under constant pressure to change or get out of the way.   

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Features
6:32 pm
Thu October 9, 2014

What Do New Orleans Criminal Court Judges Do?

Credit WYES

Election Day is just weeks away. In Orleans Parish, voters will choose who will take a seat on the bench in two sections of Criminal District Court.

In the continuing WWNO/WYES series on the Orleans Parish criminal justice system, WYES Community Projects Producer Marcia Kavanaugh helps us understand what the judges at Criminal Court actually do.

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Food
3:04 pm
Wed October 8, 2014

A New Museum To Celebrate Southern Food (And You Can Eat The Exhibits)

Eat, Drink And Be Scholarly: The Southern Food and Beverage Museum's new, permanent home in New Orleans is designed to help answer many questions — including "How does it taste?"
Stephen Binns Courtesy of SoFAB

Originally published on Wed October 8, 2014 5:59 pm

The Southern Food and Beverage Museum. Of course. It sounds so inevitable, you might assume it's existed since time immemorial: a museum to celebrate the food and drink of the American South, to enshrine barbecue and grits, showcase the heritage of Louisiana shrimpers and Kentucky bourbon.

But no.

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Coastal Desk
12:21 am
Tue October 7, 2014

WWNO's Coastal Glossary

Aerial view of wetlands
Credit U.S. Fish & Wildlife Services / Wikimedia Commons

As we explore the Gulf Coast more comprehensively than ever before, trying to understand better the complex relationships inherent in the restoration process, there's a lot to learn and keep track of.

In order to both understand and talk about coastal erosion, an expanded vocabulary is needed — one filled with brand-new terms whose definitions are integral to absorbing the problems and solutions Louisiana faces around water and land loss.

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