All Things Considered

Weekdays starting at 4 p.m.
  • Hosted by Jack Hopke, Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel

In-depth reporting that transforms the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special — sometimes quirky — features.

With the GNO Info Minute at 5:59 p.m.

Catholic bishops and other representatives of the world's more than 1 billion Roman Catholics are meeting in Rome on Sunday for the start of the Synod on the Family. This meeting will guide Church teaching on issues like marriage, divorce and contraception.

This September alone, three high school football players died after injuries sustained on the field. The latest, a 17-year-old quarterback from New Jersey, suffered a ruptured spleen during a game just over a week ago.

In some high schools across the U.S., deaths such as these — and an increased focus on the risk of head injury and concussions — have raised concerns among parents and diminished interest in the sport. At others, like the Maplewood Richmond Heights High School in suburban St. Louis, the football programs have disbanded altogether.

Caron Butler has had a stellar career. The two-time NBA All-Star has contributed his talents on the court to the Miami Heat, the LA Lakers and the Dallas Mavericks, where he was part of a championship team in 2011.

But before he got to the NBA, his life was headed in a very different direction. He had a rough upbringing in Racine, Wis., and took an unusual route to get to the pros, which included numerous drug arrests, a stint in prison and a close call that could have changed his entire life — all before he turned 18.

Many Americans are reassessing Pope Francis' triumphant U.S. tour because of his meeting with Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis. Michael Steele, former chairman of the Republican National Committee and a lifelong Catholic, shares his perspective and talks more faith and politics with host Michel Martin.

High school football is taking a hit across the U.S. as mounting research shows that the sport is linked to repeated head trauma and a number of deaths in the country. In St. Louis, a school district has disbanded its football team, citing injuries and waning demand for the sport.

After Thursday's mass shooting at an Oregon community college, which left nine people dead and more injured, President Obama aired his frustration over gun laws in the U.S. At a news conference Friday, he called on voters to push their representatives to take action.

"You just have to, for a while, be a single-issue voter, because that's what is happening on the other side," Obama said. "And that's going to take some time. I mean, the NRA has had a good start."

Airstrikes on a clinic in the Afghan city of Kunduz have killed patients and staffers from Doctors Without Borders. Al Jazeera Arabic's Washington Bureau Chief Abderrahim Foukara tells NPR's Michel Martin that, together with the Taliban capturing Kunduz, "this is really bad news."

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit



Shahzia Sikander is one of the contemporary art world's most celebrated stars. She's projecting her hypnotic video installations onto Times Square billboards; she's led exhibitions at major art museums across the world; and she was recognized by the MacArthur Foundation as a "genius" fellow in 2006.