Travis Lux

Coastal Reporter

Travis is WWNO's coastal reporter. His reporting has covered a wide range of topics -- from science and health to arts and culture. His stories have aired on local public radio stations and national shows.

Before joining WWNO, Travis reported for Marfa Public Radio in Far West Texas, and for WRKF in Baton Rouge. He he studied Anthropology and Sociology at Rhodes College and radio production at the Transom Story Workshop. 

Ways to Connect

Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council

Much of the money the state plans to get through the BP oil spill settlement will go toward big construction projects -- building barrier islands and levees.

 

Some of that money is reserved for coastal research projects, and the first projects have been announced.

 

One of the big ways the scientific research gets done on the coast is through specific projects. The state or the feds have money for a project -- like a barrier island -- and they might ask scientists to look into something for them.

National Weather Service (NWS)

The National Weather Service (NWS) lifted its tropical storm warning the the New Orleans metro area this morning. But Mayor Mitch Landrieu says we could still feel the storm’s effects.

 

“We’re not in the clear yet,” he says.

 

The city is still under a tornado watch until 7pm Wednesday, and the NWS expects three to six inches of additional rain over the next two days.

 

If that rain falls in a very short amount of time, the city could experience localized flooding.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Cities and parishes across the coast are bracing for the potential impact of Tropical Storm Cindy and urging citizens to stay safe

 

The National Hurricane Center says heavy rainfall and flooding are the biggest threats posed by this storm system. Cindy could drop anywhere from three to 12 inches over the next few days, with the heaviest rainfall expected Wednesday and Thursday. Areas areas along coast could see up to three feet of flooding.

 

Beardo62 / Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0

The Louisiana oil and gas industry in Louisiana is asking President Trump not to take coastal restoration money away from the state.

 

The funding issue at hand is the Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act (GOMESA).

 

Oil and gas companies have to pay for leases if they want to drill in the Gulf of Mexico. The federal government makes money from those leases. GOMESA is a law that requires the government share some of that money with the states on the gulf coast -- including Louisiana.

Ian Kennedy / Flickr/CC BY-SA 2.0

Several federal agencies are teaming up to do a multi-year survey of marine life in the Gulf of Mexico. The goal is to better understand how oil and gas activities impact marine species, and it’s huge in scope.

 

If you want to know how oil and gas activity in the Gulf of Mexico impacts water creatures -- or how to minimize those impacts -- you have to know as much as you can about them.

Travis Lux / WWNO

Last week President Trump pulled the U.S out of the Paris Climate Agreement -- or Paris Climate Accord. When it was ratified in 2015 it was a big deal -- almost every country in the world met in Paris to agree on a way to fight climate change.

 

But Trump says the deal isn’t good for business. Pulling out could have implications for Louisiana. WWNO's Travis Lux talked with Dr. Bob Thomas, professor of environmental communication at Loyola University, about what it will mean.

 

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Flickr/CC BY 2.0

Today, Thursday, June 1st, is the official start of hurricane season.

 

Local officials say they’re ready. But they want to make sure you are too, and hope some new technology helps.

 

If there’s one thing state and local officials want you to know, it’s this: have a plan.

NOAA

Hurricane season starts June 1st. In their annual outlook released today, forecasters from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) predict that the Atlantic Ocean will see "above average" hurricane activity this hurricane season, which runs through November 30th.

 


Listening Coast

The Trump administration has released a more detailed budget proposal for the next fiscal year, which would mean less money for coastal restoration in Louisiana.

 

Funding for the Coastal Master Plan is cobbled together from several different places -- like the State of Louisiana, the Federal government, and the BP oil spill settlement.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The Mississippi River remains high as floodwater makes its way south from the Midwest, and the Army Corps of Engineers is inspecting the levees daily for problems like leaks.

 

The Corps started inspecting the river about two weeks ago, as the water began to rise.

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