Thomas Walsh

Producer

Thomas Walsh is an independent radio producer and audio engineer who lives in New Orleans. You'll see him around town recording music, podcasts, short films, live events and radio features. He's practically glued to his headphones. A movie geek to his core, he's seen every film listed on the American Film Institute's 100 Years...100 Movies and would love to talk to you about them.

Ways to Connect

Thomas Walsh / WWNO

Earlier this month, Ooh Poo Pah Doo Bar on Orleans Avenue in the Treme was shut down.

The St. Claude Street Bridge raises as a barge passes beneath it.
Thomas Walsh / WWNO

Southeastern Louisiana relies on federal funds to keep it a viable place to live. That means constant construction; roads, levees, and the latest project, a $951 million dollar plan to widen the Industrial Canal. The Army Corps of Engineers has reached out to the surrounding communities for input and the proposal is wildly unpopular. The Listening Post wanted to hear both sides of the debate. 

The Listening Post asked:

1) What kind of input should communities have on federal projects like these?

The Listening Post at Carver Collegiate Academy in New Orleans East.
Thomas Walsh / The Listening Post

This past winter WWNO’s education desk looked at how local schools are dealing with trauma in their classrooms. To wrap up their series they collaborated with The Listening Post to bring their questions to Carver Collegiate Academy in New Orleans East. Reporter Mallory Falk and producer Claudia Lopez take a listen to the results.

The Listening Post / The Listening Post

Earlier this month, Louisiana State Senator Bill Cassidy held a town hall meeting at the East Jefferson Parish Library.

Jesse Hardman / Jesse Hardman

The Trump administration is denying refugees and immigrants from certain Muslim-majority countries entry to the United States. Trump’s also calling for local law enforcement to help detain undocumented immigrants for deportation. Mayor Landrieu has stated the “NOPD will not be coerced into joining Trump’s deportation army.”

Eugenie Saussaye, a French immigrant who founded the Vieux Carre Hair Shop in 1877.
Vieux Carre Hair Shop / Vieux Carre Hair Shop

Bill Saussaye’s family has helped decorate Mardi Gras krewes for generations. His family’s shop, the Vieux Carre Hair Shop, is not only a destination for the kings and captains of Mardi Gras, but a catalyst for keeping festival traditions alive and well.

The Vieux Carre Hair Shop was founded in 1877 by Bill Saussaye’s great-grandmother, Eugenie. The shop is now located Uptown on Maple Street and has extended hours for the Mardi Gras season. This interview was conducted by Mark Cave for the Historic New Orleans Collection and produced for WWNO by Thomas Walsh. 

A headshot from Lisa Suarez, late 1980's.
Lisa Suarez / Lisa Suarez

For nearly 20 years Lisa Suarez worked as a striptease artist on Bourbon Street and is often credited for reviving its burlesque scene in the late 80’s.

This week we have the latest episode of WWNO’s community engagement project The Listening Post. To kick of 2017, the team asked folks around New Orleans about the stigma of mental health in their communities and what self-care tips they recommend for keeping it together.

The Listening Post's questions for January are:

What is the BIGGEST cause of stress in your life?

What self care methods do you rely on to combat stress? 

Blueberry and Almond pie
Kelly Sue DeConnick / Mindmatrix

Morning, noon, or night, anytime is a good time for pie. But for local businessman Omar Aziz, it is so much more than a delicious treat. He spoke with historian Mark Cave for NOLA Life Stories.

Doc Hawley first started working on riverboats in 1957 and stayed on board until his retirement a few years ago.
Historic New Orleans Collection / Historic New Orleans Collection

Every day in the French Quarter people are drawn – almost magnetically - to the riverboat calliope. There is an undeniable nostalgic sound to it and it may even remind you of childhood. But romance aside, this icon of Americana has its own history, which Captain Doc Hawley shared with the Historic New Orleans Collection and Nola Life Stories.

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