Tegan Wendland

Coastal Reporter, Interim News Director

Tegan Wendland is WWNO's Interim News Director. She also reports on the coast. She has a background in investigative news reporting and an M.S. in Life Sciences Communication from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has worked as a reporter for Wisconsin Public Radio, The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, WRKF-FM in Baton Rouge and WVIK-FM in Rock Island, Illinois. Her stories have aired nationally on All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Marketplace. 

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The Army Corps of Engineers is planning to temporarily close down some areas of The Fly, a popular Uptown park on the levee by Audubon Park, for a much-needed upgrade. The Corps will hold a public input meeting about the project at 6:00pm Thursday at the Audubon Nature Institute.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

New Orleans’ streets drew national attention this spring after a giant sinkhole opened up downtown during JazzFest. Since then, several more holes have made it into local news - in Uptown and Mid city.

New Orleanians are used to complaining about persistent potholes in all parts of the city - but, sinkholes are a different animal.

A church sign near the site of the shooting of six police officers in Baton Rouge on Sunday.
Jesse Hardman / WWNO

Governor John Bel Edwards and state and local law enforcement held a press conference Monday afternoon to provide details on their investigation into an attack on police officers on Sunday in Baton Rouge. Three officers were killed and three were wounded in the attack. The shooter was shot and killed on the scene.

Ryan Kailath / WWNO

Tourism has long been a part of the culture of New Orleans, but more people are visiting the state’s swamps and bayous than ever before.

In Blind River, one local woman’s expression of faith has become an attraction - one that her family keeps going.

Bob Marshall / The Lens

The recent outbreak of the Zika virus has New Orleans on edge. The Gulf Coast is considered the most vulnerable part of the U.S. Mayor Mitch Landrieu has asked Congress for money to fight Zika, as the city continues local efforts to understand the mosquito-borne disease.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Even as the price of oil drops, and offshore drilling slows down, huge amounts of crude oil keep flowing into Louisiana’s oil ports. The biggest is LOOP, the Louisiana Offshore Oil Port. It’s a major pass-through point for a lot of U.S. crude. But instead of heading out to refineries, oil is being stockpiled at LOOP.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The oil and gas downturn has resulted in a loss of about 12,000 jobs across Louisiana over the past year. Many of those jobs are concentrated in smaller metropolitan areas, like the Cajun city of Lafayette, which has lost the most. The city that once boomed as a result of oil and gas activity is now struggling to not go bust.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

A sudden drop in oil prices last year has brought huge challenges to the state of Louisiana — more than 10,000 layoffs in the oil and gas sector and a $400 million hit to the state budget. Long known for its “working coast” — represented by shipping, fishing and industry in south Louisiana and along the Mississippi River — the downturn brings with it something of an identity crisis.

Volunteers help a group of children on a field trip make prints of local fish at the Northlake Nature Center.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

With thousands of acres of wildlife refuges along Lake Pontchartrain and the Bogue Chitto River, the Northshore is known for its natural beauty.

The volunteers at one small park near Mandeville are working to provide opportunities for people to get involved and develop a deeper understanding of the local ecosystem. At the Northlake Nature Center, that appreciation begins with children.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

With oil prices down, Louisiana has lost about 12,000 jobs in oil and gas since last year. Some of those oil and gas workers are finding new jobs in coastal restoration. That includes helping rebuild a chain of barrier islands to protect the coast. One of those state-funded projects is in Plaquemines Parish.

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