Tegan Wendland

Coastal Reporter, Interim News Director

Tegan Wendland is WWNO's Interim News Director. She also reports on the coast. She has a background in investigative news reporting and an M.S. in Life Sciences Communication from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has worked as a reporter for Wisconsin Public Radio, The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, WRKF-FM in Baton Rouge and WVIK-FM in Rock Island, Illinois. Her stories have aired nationally on All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Marketplace. 

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The deadline to apply for funding under the state Shelter at Home program is this Friday, October 21st.

The program provides up to $15,000 for basic repairs allowing residents to live in in their homes as they continue the rebuilding process. Ten thousand people have already benefited from the program. 

Eligible repairs include weatherproofing, securing broken doors and windows, and a safety inspection of wiring and plumbing. Money for temporary appliances such as small refrigerators and microwaves is also available.

Verdin family

Every five years, the state revamps its master plan to restore coastal Louisiana. This year, they’re hosting community meetings in coastal areas to tell people about master plan updates for 2017.

The Coastal Restoration and Protection Authority’s master plan is in the process of being updated, which happens every five years. The new plan includes “non structural” projects – like elevation, flood proofing, and even relocating people. In order to get local input, CPRA officials are hosting a series of community conversations along the coast.

Facebook photos compiled by takepart.com / takepart.com

This week on All Things New Orleans, City Council is expected to make its first vote on regulating short-term rentals, we’ll hear from both sides. We’ll take a look at how crowdfunding has changed the nature of disaster relief in light of the floods in south Louisiana.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Like any major disaster, when floods hit south Louisiana last month, big relief organizations streamed in - and people all over the world gave money. But it’s no longer just the big brand names of philanthropy that attract donations from afar. Crowdfunding has grown up, and now millions of dollars are funneled to small and specific causes. In Baton Rouge, it has changed the nature of flood relief efforts.

 

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Louisiana’s governor, John Bel Edwards, was in Washington DC last week lobbying Congress to approve a disaster aid package of nearly $3 billion to help with flood relief. Part of that would go to help small businesses recover. In addition to more than 140,000 homes, nearly 7,000 businesses were flooded-out.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

As people in cities and towns across Louisiana continue the ongoing cleanup of flood-damaged buildings and homes, farmers face another set of problems. Many corn, soybean, sugar and rice farmers in the southern part of the state had their fields flooded with several feet of water. Now they are trying to figure out what comes next.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Sea level rise and land loss is affecting communities all over the world, not just in Louisiana. But Louisiana has one of the first communities that will be entirely resettled as a result: the Isle de Jean Charles.

  

 


Tegan Wendland / WWNO

On this eleventh anniversary of Hurricane Katrina, officials gathered to remember the dead. As WWNO’s Tegan Wendland reports, they held a prayer service and wreath-laying ceremony. This year’s memorial feels especially poignant, as parishes across southern Louisiana reel from devastating floods.

Gov. John Bel Edwards will hold a press conference at 11 a.m. Tuesday with FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate and the Governor’s Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness. WWNO will carry the event live.

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