Tegan Wendland

Coastal Reporter, Interim News Director

Tegan Wendland is WWNO's Interim News Director. She has an M.S. in Life Sciences Communication from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has reported for Wisconsin Public Radio, The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, WRKF-FM in Baton Rouge and WVIK-FM in Rock Island, Illinois. Her work has aired nationally on shows like All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Reveal, Here and Now, Science Friday and Marketplace

When she's not reporting, Tegan is making kimchi, camping or kayaking. 

Ways to Connect

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

It turns out Louisiana's climate is a lot like Sub-Saharan Africa's. So it makes some sense you’d see animals usually spotted on safari at Global Wildlife -- an animal refuge on the Northshore in Folsom. There, visitors can learn about 4,000 exotic, endangered and threatened animals from all over the world.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers / http://www.mvn.usace.army.mil

Staving off coastal land loss in Louisiana will take lots of money and lots of manpower. In just the next four years, GNO Inc. expects up to 12,000 new jobs in the so-called “water sector,” like coastal restoration managers and mathematicians who can model water flow.

 

But there are not enough workers in the region with the skills to fill those jobs. The new University of New Orleans certificate in Coastal Engineering and Science aims to remedy that.

America's Watershed Initiative

A new report card for the Mississippi River basin is not good. The lower Mississippi gets a D+ from a water coalition due to poor infrastructure maintenance, run-down levees and unhealthy fish.

America’s Watershed Initiative is a coalition of industry, academic and environmental groups. Its report card graded watersheds along the river, and the river as a whole, by looking at ecosystems, transportation, water supply, flood control and the economy.

A report released Tuesday says Louisiana is using too much natural gas. The Union of Concerned Scientists rates states based on their reliance on natural gas. Louisiana is among the most at-risk.

Tulane University

A proposal to build a new coal export terminal in Plaquemines Parish has drawn criticism from environmental groups and the public, who say it presents a public health threat. It has been so contentious that the state Department of Natural Resources has faced lawsuits and is currently reviewing its approval of the project after taking input from the public.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

Paul Prudhomme, the internationally-known New Orleans chef and restaurateur, has died. He was 75.

Prudhomme popularized Cajun and Creole cooking in the 1980’s. His death was confirmed by his restaurant, K-Paul's Louisiana Kitchen, according to WWL-TV.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

When a child witnesses or is the victim of a crime their testimony is often necessary in order to find out the truth and press charges. But getting them to talk and participate in a very adult process can be difficult and they need to be protected. A Covington-based nonprofit works with law enforcement and parents to sort it all out.
 

Hope House looks like a house, and it feels like one too. Located on a quiet back street, its offices are inside of a renovated home, with a tidy yard and pinwheels leading up to the front door.

Eileen Fleming / WWNO

It’s settled – BP has to pay $20 billion for the gulf oil spill in 2010. The deal announced Monday finalizes civil claims and ends five years of legal fighting.

The Department of Justice says BP has to pay Clean Water Act fines and settle with the five gulf states that were impacted - Alabama, Florida, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The Environmental Protection Agency announced a number of rule changes this week that could have a big impact on industry and quality of life in Louisiana. The new rules cut ozone emissions from 75 parts per billion to 70, and complying might pose a challenge for the state. New Orleans and Baton Rouge are now out of attainment.

fema.gov

The Environmental Protection Agency released new standards on Tuesday for emissions from petroleum refineries.

The EPA says the standards will cut down on CO2 emissions and prevent about 1.4 million people from being exposed to pollutants in the air, like benzene. Regularly breathing such pollutants can cause respiratory problems, increased risk of cancer and other health problems.

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