Tegan Wendland

Coastal Reporter, Interim News Director

Tegan Wendland is WWNO's Interim News Director. She has an M.S. in Life Sciences Communication from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has reported for Wisconsin Public Radio, The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, WRKF-FM in Baton Rouge and WVIK-FM in Rock Island, Illinois. Her work has aired nationally on shows like All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Reveal, Here and Now, Science Friday and Marketplace

When she's not reporting, Tegan is making kimchi, camping or kayaking. 

Ways to Connect

http://www.cop21paris.org

Join WWNO and partners for a panel on the United Nations talks on climate change. COP 21: A Turning Point for Global Climate Change will be held on Friday, November 20 at 10 a.m.

The panel will discuss the importance of reaching a global climate agreement at the COP 21 conference in Paris, France, this December. Experts will discuss the potential impact on Louisiana and how the state fits into the global conversation on climate change.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Business is good for the Port of New Orleans. Cargo shipping is up about 20 percent this year from last. Because the Port is an independent public entity, not run by the city or state, it can take that extra money and invest it right back into operations. There are currently more than $40 million worth of improvements underway as a result.

Louisiana Sea Grant College Program at Louisiana State University

The state is bringing back its program to test fish for mercury, a heavy metal that is dangerous for human consumption. The program will be back up and running in January.

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality scaled back the program in 2008, when it ran out of funding.

Mercury comes from burning coal and other industrial activities. It gets into the air and then settles in streams and other waters, where fish absorb it.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The National Alliance on Mental Illness in St. Tammany Parish is trying something a little new: training people who have mental illnesses to help people with similar problems.

Roxanne Skal is a Peer Support Specialist. She works with a variety of people, both in community support groups and at the Northlake Behavioral Health Center in Mandeville. A couple times a week, she drives from her office on one side of Northlake’s campus to a little brown brick house on the other side, where she leads a group for recovering alcoholics.

Detroit Publishing Company photo via Library of Congress website

The Mississippi River ferry terminal downtown will soon be expanding. The city has received a $10 million federal grant from the U.S. Department of Transportation to develop the terminal at the end of Canal Street.

The Army Corps of Engineers is proposing a new way to measure the value of wetlands and restore those destroyed by industry.

The proposed Louisiana Wetlands Rapid Assessment Method, or LRAM, is a compensatory wetland mitigation method that will help them evaluate different types of wetlands, like bottomland hardwoods or cypress swamp, and determine how to offset destruction caused by development.

If a company wants to build in the wetlands it has to replace what is destroyed.

Heavy rainfall Sunday and overnight is causing flooding and high tides in coastal Louisiana. There was a small breach in the levee in a Myrtle Grove subdivision, according to Fox 8 television, and the Department of Wildlife and Fisheries evacuated 23 people from a flooded trailer park in Tangipahoa Parish this morning.

mississippiriverdelta.org

The state announced on Wednesday that it will divert water from the Mississippi River to rebuild eroding wetlands in Plaquemines Parish.

The Mid-Barataria and Mid-Breton diversions are the first two projects of this scale.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

It turns out Louisiana's climate is a lot like Sub-Saharan Africa's. So it makes some sense you’d see animals usually spotted on safari at Global Wildlife -- an animal refuge on the Northshore in Folsom. There, visitors can learn about 4,000 exotic, endangered and threatened animals from all over the world.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers / http://www.mvn.usace.army.mil

Staving off coastal land loss in Louisiana will take lots of money and lots of manpower. In just the next four years, GNO Inc. expects up to 12,000 new jobs in the so-called “water sector,” like coastal restoration managers and mathematicians who can model water flow.

 

But there are not enough workers in the region with the skills to fill those jobs. The new University of New Orleans certificate in Coastal Engineering and Science aims to remedy that.

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