Tegan Wendland

Coastal Reporter, Interim News Director

Tegan Wendland is WWNO's Interim News Director. She also reports on the coast. She has a background in investigative news reporting and an M.S. in Life Sciences Communication from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has reported for Wisconsin Public Radio, The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, WRKF-FM in Baton Rouge and WVIK-FM in Rock Island, Illinois. Her work has aired nationally on All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Here and Now, Science Friday and Marketplace. 

When she's not reporting, Tegan is making kimchi, camping or kayaking. 

Ways to Connect

Brett Duke, NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

Climate change skeptics, including President Donald Trump, have been vocal the past couple weeks about how cold snaps in the south and northeast do not fit in with the global warming narrative. On this week's coastal news roundup, Nola.com | The Times-Picayune environmental reporters Sara Sneath and Mark Schleifstein talk about how cold weather shakes out in a warming world.

This story is a collaboration with Reveal, the Center for Investigative Reporting, and PRX. You can share your own experience with increased flooding here.

Ted Jackson / NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

For this week's coastal news roundup WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with Nola.com/The Times-Picayune coastal reporter Tristan Baurick about new flood control management, illegal oystering, and a marsh grass die-off in the Mississippi Delta. 

Sara Sneath / Nola.com | The Times-Picayune

On this week's coastal news roundup, WWNO's Tegan Wendland talked with Nola.com | The Times-Picayune's coastal reporter Sara Sneath about how land loss is affecting a native duck species, prioritizing coastal restoration projects and new funding to rebuild a barrier island.

David Grunfeld / NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

On this week's installment of the Louisiana coastal roundup, WWNO's Tegan Wendland talked with NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune coastal reporter Sara Sneath about an oil spill near Venice that has been characterized as the largest spill in the U.S. since BP's Macondo well blowout in 2010.

Tyler Antrup with the city’s Office of Resilience, Loyola law professor Rob Verchick, architect David Waggonner and assistant inspector general Nadiene Van Dyke. It was moderated by history professor Eric Hardy.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board has been under fire since the city’s pumping system failed and caused major flooding in August.  

nola.com

The National Hurricane Center predicted 2017 to be an above-average year for storms. But so far Harvey and Irma have been some of the strongest storms on record.

Environmental reporter Mark Schleifstein has reported on hurricanes throughout his 33 years with The Times-Picayune. As a result, he's garnered quite a reputation.

On this week's coastal news roundup, WWNO coastal reporter Tegan Wendland and Nola.com The Times-Picayune coastal reporter Sara Sneath talk with him about how modeling has changed, and how this season compares to years past.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

With much of the Texas coast devastated by tropical storm Harvey, Louisiana continues to send help. Lake Charles has become a staging ground for relief efforts.

weather.gov

Tropical Storm Harvey has made landfall another time, this time on the Louisiana coast, near Cameron Parish. The state is bracing for up to 10 inches of rain and strong winds.

The National Weather Service is warning of torrential rain and potential tornados.

www.nhc.noaa.gov

New Orleans is bracing for the heavy rains generated by Hurricane Harvey with a pumping system that is still not fully operational.

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu held a press conference today, saying he's confident the pumps will handle the deluge. He says crews have been working 24-hours a day to repair pumps that failed during heavy rain earlier this month. Some neighborhoods sustained several feet of standing water. He says the system is now operating at 92 percent.

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