Tegan Wendland

Coastal Reporter, Interim News Director

Tegan Wendland is WWNO's Interim News Director. She also reports on the coast. She has a background in investigative news reporting and an M.S. in Life Sciences Communication from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has reported for Wisconsin Public Radio, The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, WRKF-FM in Baton Rouge and WVIK-FM in Rock Island, Illinois. Her work has aired nationally on All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Here and Now, Science Friday and Marketplace. 

When she's not reporting, Tegan is making kimchi, camping or kayaking. 

Ways to Connect

David Grunfeld / NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

On this week's installment of the Louisiana coastal roundup, WWNO's Tegan Wendland talked with NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune coastal reporter Sara Sneath about an oil spill near Venice that has been characterized as the largest spill in the U.S. since BP's Macondo well blowout in 2010.

Tyler Antrup with the city’s Office of Resilience, Loyola law professor Rob Verchick, architect David Waggonner and assistant inspector general Nadiene Van Dyke. It was moderated by history professor Eric Hardy.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The New Orleans Sewerage and Water Board has been under fire since the city’s pumping system failed and caused major flooding in August.  

nola.com

The National Hurricane Center predicted 2017 to be an above-average year for storms. But so far Harvey and Irma have been some of the strongest storms on record.

Environmental reporter Mark Schleifstein has reported on hurricanes throughout his 33 years with The Times-Picayune. As a result, he's garnered quite a reputation.

On this week's coastal news roundup, WWNO coastal reporter Tegan Wendland and Nola.com The Times-Picayune coastal reporter Sara Sneath talk with him about how modeling has changed, and how this season compares to years past.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

With much of the Texas coast devastated by tropical storm Harvey, Louisiana continues to send help. Lake Charles has become a staging ground for relief efforts.

weather.gov

Tropical Storm Harvey has made landfall another time, this time on the Louisiana coast, near Cameron Parish. The state is bracing for up to 10 inches of rain and strong winds.

The National Weather Service is warning of torrential rain and potential tornados.

www.nhc.noaa.gov

New Orleans is bracing for the heavy rains generated by Hurricane Harvey with a pumping system that is still not fully operational.

New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu held a press conference today, saying he's confident the pumps will handle the deluge. He says crews have been working 24-hours a day to repair pumps that failed during heavy rain earlier this month. Some neighborhoods sustained several feet of standing water. He says the system is now operating at 92 percent.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Under overcast skies, officials are urging caution, not panic, ahead of heavy weekend rains. The city has been on-edge since failures of the pumping system contributed to widespread flooding on Aug. 5.

Since then, some public officials have been fired— and some, but not all, of the pumps have been fixed.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu says the city remains vulnerable.

Nola.com/The Times-Picayune

On this week's installment of the Louisiana coastal roundup, WWNO radio's interim news director, Tegan Wendland, and NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune coastal reporter Mark Schleifstein talk about the largest low-oxygen dead zone in modern history along Louisiana's coast -- nearly 9,000 square miles, or as large as New Jersey.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Florida is facing major threats from climate change and sea level rise. Up to six feet of water could inundate the coast by the end of the century. Officials are trying to prepare and “resilience officers” are leading the charge in the Miami-area. 

WWNO’s Tegan Wendland met up with James Murley, Miami-Dade’s chief resilience officer, to talk about how the tourist mecca is grappling with these challenges. 

Support for the Coastal Desk comes from the Walton Family Foundation, the Coypu Foundation and the Greater New Orleans Foundation.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

As Louisiana’s coast continues to disappear, people are moving inland. The state says thousands may be forced to leave their homes -  but where will they go, and how will those places, known as ‘receiver communities,’ change?

For clues, we can look to St. Tammany Parish, where thousands moved after Hurricane Katrina.

It’s a typical Saturday at Mutt’s restaurant in Mandeville. Families laugh together over seafood and bread pudding.

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