Tegan Wendland

Coastal Reporter, Interim News Director

Tegan Wendland is WWNO's Interim News Director. She has an M.S. in Life Sciences Communication from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has reported for Wisconsin Public Radio, The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, WRKF-FM in Baton Rouge and WVIK-FM in Rock Island, Illinois. Her work has aired nationally on shows like All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Reveal, Here and Now, Science Friday and Marketplace

When she's not reporting, Tegan is making kimchi, camping or kayaking. 

Ways to Connect

Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

The controversy continues over actors who were paid to attend public meetings and speak in support of a new Entergy power plant in New Orleans East.

www.airnow.gov

An air quality alert is in effect today for much of the listening area. Ozone levels are forecast to rise to potentially unhealthy levels for sensitive groups. Officials say children and elderly adults should avoid prolonged outdoor activities.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu, at a press conference in 2015.
Thomas Walsh / WWNO

It’s Mitch Landrieu’s last week as mayor. Latoya Cantrell takes the office on Monday.

Landrieu came into office eight years ago facing a huge budget deficit and the challenge of rebuilding after Hurricane Katrina. In the past year he’s drawn national attention for removing confederate monuments and publishing a book about the experience.

Brad Glorioso, USGS / NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

A colony of invasive frogs has established itself at Audubon Park and Zoo in New Orleans. Researchers say one way you can humanely help curb the population is to put the invasive frogs in your freezer.

On this week's Coastal News Roundup, WWNO's Tegan Wendland talked with Nola.com | The Times-Picayune reporter about the long-term implications of the invasive frog and more. 

 

 

NOLA.com | The Times Picayune / NASA

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: an expedited process for Mississippi River sediment diversions, a study on the causes of Mississippi flooding, and a new understanding of why the Gulf of Mexico is eroding. 

WWNO's Tegan Wendland spoke with reporter Tristan Baurick, from NOLA.com | The Times Picayune.

David Grunfeld / Nola.com |The Times-Picayune

On this week's coastal news roundup, WWNO's Tegan Wendland talked with  Sara Sneath of NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune about chemical releases in St. James Parish, barrier islands, and coral reefs. 

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

This weekend is Super Sunday — when Mardi Gras Indians come out to show their costumes to the world. We caught up with Edward Buckner at his home in the 8th Ward — where he and his youth Indian tribe have worked all year on their costumes.  

Brett Duke / NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: The Mighty Mississippi was particularly mighty this week. The Army Corps of Engineers opened the Bonnet Carret Spillway to ease some of the pressure as the river rises. Also this week, new research reveals that thousands of Coast Guard members were harmed by the chemicals used to clean up the BP Deepwater Horizon oil disaster. 

Travis Lux / WWNO

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: coastal law. Coastal parishes are suing oil companies, environmental advocates are suing the Army Corps, the Attorney General is also suing the Corps, and there’s been a recent surge in civil lawsuits over the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. It's hard to keep it all straight. It seems that in the struggle to come up with funds to fight coastal land loss, officials are turning to litigation.

WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with Chris Dalbom of Tulane’s Institute on Water Resources Law and Policy.

In New Orleans, Mardi Gras is not just Fat Tuesday itself, it's a multi-week celebration. It's also a huge mess.

The plastic beads, cups, and trinkets that fly from the floats don't all get caught — even by the most enthusiastic crowds. And after a bead has hit the ground it immediately turns from prize to garbage, especially in this year's rain and mud.

Pages