Tegan Wendland

Coastal Reporter, Interim News Director

Tegan Wendland is WWNO's Interim News Director. She has an M.S. in Life Sciences Communication from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and has reported for Wisconsin Public Radio, The Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism, WRKF-FM in Baton Rouge and WVIK-FM in Rock Island, Illinois. Her work has aired nationally on shows like All Things Considered, Morning Edition, Reveal, Here and Now, Science Friday and Marketplace

When she's not reporting, Tegan is making kimchi, camping or kayaking. 

Ways to Connect

Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

Climate change is bringing more extreme temperatures —- the last decade was the warmest on record. Scientists say that pattern will continue.

In Louisiana, temperatures could increase by 10 degrees by the end of the century. Heat stresses human health and the electric grid. How prepared is New Orleans for the heat?

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

New Orleans is vulnerable. Even a small storm can wipe out power for thousands of homes. Scientists say climate change is going to bring more intense storms, heavier rainfall and increased heat. More than a decade after Hurricane Katrina, officials say the city is more protected than ever. But big storms are just one threat. This week, WWNO explores how prepared the city is for the threats that climate change will bring with a special Coastal Desk series, New Orleans: Ready Or Not?

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / nola.com/The Times-Picayune

For this week's coastal news roundup, WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with science fellow at nola.com/Times Picayune, Joan Meiners, about sea lice, migrating tropical diseases and bugs.

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention / nola.com/The Times-Picayune

For this week's coastal news roundup, WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with science fellow at nola.com/Times Picayune, Joan Meiners, about sea lice, migrating tropical diseases and bugs.

NOAA / noaa.gov

June first is the official start of hurricane season. It got started early with subtropical storm Alberto last weekend — forecasters say it’s likely to be an active or above-average season.

Army Corps of Engineers

Ahead of the official start of hurricane season nola.com/The Times-Picayune has released a series on the hurricane protection system built around the city. WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with reporter Mark Schleifstein about what he found.

Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

The controversy continues over actors who were paid to attend public meetings and speak in support of a new Entergy power plant in New Orleans East.

www.airnow.gov

An air quality alert is in effect today for much of the listening area. Ozone levels are forecast to rise to potentially unhealthy levels for sensitive groups. Officials say children and elderly adults should avoid prolonged outdoor activities.

Mayor Mitch Landrieu, at a press conference in 2015.
Thomas Walsh / WWNO

It’s Mitch Landrieu’s last week as mayor. Latoya Cantrell takes the office on Monday.

Landrieu came into office eight years ago facing a huge budget deficit and the challenge of rebuilding after Hurricane Katrina. In the past year he’s drawn national attention for removing confederate monuments and publishing a book about the experience.

Brad Glorioso, USGS / NOLA.com | The Times-Picayune

A colony of invasive frogs has established itself at Audubon Park and Zoo in New Orleans. Researchers say one way you can humanely help curb the population is to put the invasive frogs in your freezer.

On this week's Coastal News Roundup, WWNO's Tegan Wendland talked with Nola.com | The Times-Picayune reporter about the long-term implications of the invasive frog and more. 

 

 

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