Scott Detrow

Scott Detrow is a congressional correspondent for NPR. He also co-hosts the NPR Politics Podcast.

Detrow joined NPR in 2015 to cover the presidential election. He focused on the Republican side of the 2016 race, spending time on the campaign trail with Donald Trump, and also reported on the election's technology and data angles.

Detrow worked as a statehouse reporter for member stations WITF in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, and KQED in San Francisco, California. He has also covered energy policy for NPR's StateImpact project, where his reports on Pennsylvania's hydraulic fracturing boom won a DuPont-Columbia and national Edward R. Murrow Award in 2013.

Detrow got his start in public radio at Fordham University's WFUV. He graduated from Fordham, despite spending most of his time in the newsroom, and also has a master's degree at the University of Pennsylvania's Fels Institute of Government.

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A couple of weeks ago, NPR's Weekend Edition told you about America's only elected dogcatcher, Zeb Towne. He's held that position in the town of Duxbury, Vt. for 15 years in a row.

Towne told us he had never been bothered by that timeworn political insult: "You couldn't get elected dogcatcher!"

Major League Baseball players have more than a month to get ready for the season and shake off their winter rust, there's no spring training for the grounds crew.

There isn't much prep time before the MLB's nationwide opening day, when the field has to be perfect: Not too wet, not too dry, and the grass just the right length so that ground balls don't slow down too much or skip too quickly.

It has been a bad week for Cambridge Analytica.

Updated at 5:30 a.m. ET Wednesday

Votes are still being tallied in Tuesday's special election in Pennsylvania's 18th Congressional District — and it appears nearly every single one will need to be counted.

The race between Republican Rick Saccone and Democrat Conor Lamb is down to the wire for this seat deep in Trump country, with confidence at Lamb's campaign early in the night giving way to supporters holding their collective breath as the results tightened to a near tie through the evening.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

SARAH MCCAMMON, HOST:

A grassroots rally featuring customized Beatles lyrics and sickle-and-hammer-adorned Donald Trump signs might not be the place you'd expect an outbreak of political pragmatism.

It came as the crowd sang a parody of "Come Together."

"Here come elections / We've got people running / we've high emotions / we've got strange primary," sang the protestors there for their weekly picket of Republican Darrell Issa's district office, as a tambourine beat away. "Come together, right now / turn it blue."

Sen. Dick Durbin, D-Ill., has long led the push to provide a permanent legal status for "DREAMers" — young adults in the United States illegally who were brought to the country as children.

Durbin was in the mix on multiple bipartisan deals in recent months, as the clock ticked toward a March 5 expiration of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, which President Trump decided in September 2017 to end.

The Democratic National Committee's latest fundraising update fits into the general spot the committee has found itself in over the past year: Better than before, but still not good enough.

The DNC brought in more money than it did this time last year, but Democrats' $6 million January fundraising totals were still doubled by their Republican counterparts.

It's been a year since former Labor Secretary Tom Perez took charge of a DNC hurt by neglect, a hacking scandal and a devastating presidential election.

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