Peter Ricchiuti

Host of Out to Lunch / Executive Council

Peter Ricchiuti is the finance professor you wish you had back in college! He is the Assistant Dean at Tulane University's A.B. Freeman School of Business, and his insight and humor have twice made him the School's top professor. After a successful career on Wall Street, Ricchiuti served for five years as Assistant State Treasurer and Chief Investment Officer for the State of Louisiana. There he skillfully managed the State's $3 billion investment portfolio.

In 1993, Ricchiuti founded the Burkenroad Reports investment research program, where he leads a team of more than 160 business students in search of the investment "skinny" on undervalued stocks in six southern states. Ricchiuti and the Burkenroad Reports have been featured in The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, Investor’s Business Daily, The Washington Post, CNN and CNBC.

Ricchiuti is a frequent contributor in financial and business media, including Marketplace, the nationally broadcast public radio program. He is a popular speaker at meetings and conferences throughout the United States and in Europe. His unique presentation style puts him in front of a wide variety of audiences, including his selection by the NFL to teach investment workshops to the New Orleans Saints.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

When it comes to business, we all agree on one thing: we all want to succeed. Typically we measure success numerically -- the more profit we make the better we’re doing. Sure, we’d all like to make billions, but the reality is most of us are not going to turn our businesses into Facebook or Apple. For many people in business, just keeping the doors open and the lights on is succeeding.

Peter Ricchiuti's guests on Out to Lunch take whatever your definition of success is -- whether it’s making a fortune or just making it till Friday -- and help you get there.

Out To Lunch: Giving
Dionne Grayson / It's New Orleans

In 2005, many of us in New Orleans found ourselves in a position we could never have imagined. Homeless. Our place of work closed down. Our insurance companies refusing to compensate us. And our government largely useless.

Until then it was just a cliché. But the kindness of strangers saved our lives. And our city. It is no exaggeration to say that in those dire days New Orleans was resurrected by good people and charitable organizations.

Chet Overall / It's New Orleans

There’s an old saying about how to be successful in business - “Build a better mousetrap.” Meaning find a product everybody wants and do it better.

Peter's guests on Out to Lunch today have come up with new variations of products that enjoy massive worldwide popularity. Soft drinks and coffee.

Dionne Grayson / It's New Orleans

For the past few years, with all the Hollywood folks in town, it’s not unusual for someone at Whole Foods in New Orleans to whisper, “Do you know who that is?” It’s usually a celebrity who looks quite different in the cereal aisle from how she looks on the screen.

Today on Out to Lunch Peter's playing a business version of "Do you know who that is?"

Dionne Grayson / It's New Orleans

There are two types of people in the world. The type that think 3D printing is the new industrial revolution. And the type that says, “What the heck is 3D printing?”

There’s a local 3D printing company called Entrescan that’s hoping to convert the Type B folks to Type A with a phone app called Scandy.

Out To Lunch: Oil And Gusts
Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

Everybody likes to think they’re important, but here in Louisiana we really are. Two sectors of our local economy are major components of the national, and global, economy: oil and gas, and renewable energy.

Outside of the oil companies who physically drill for oil, there is a huge industry of companies who do everything else – from building oil rigs to delivering groceries to the men and women who work on them. One of the biggest offshore support companies in the world is headquartered here in New Orleans. Tidewater.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

In business, and other organizations, we hear about "mission drift." That's a condition where the organization loses track of what it set out to accomplish. The way to re-focus is to get back to basics.

That’s what we're doing today on Out to Lunch. We’re talking about three very basic elements - sunshine, water and dirt. And we’re looking at how we can harness these three elements to re-focus us on one of our missions as a city that we seem to have drifted away from –- resurrecting the 9th Ward.

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

The financial markets go up and down. The value of real estate goes up and down. The dollar strengthens and weakens. Financial advisors have a wide range of theories of risk versus diversification that they say can either make you a fortune, or hedge your bets. Through all this noise, there are investor voices who continue to say just two words. “Buy gold.” Is that good advice? Or is that just as risky as anything else?

Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

  According to the reputable Henry J Kaiser Family Foundation, right around twenty percent of the population of the United States is under 15. That’s a sizeable market. You don’t have to look very far to see the marketers of stuff that kids like trying to sell it to them. Mostly food and toys. Which demonstrates that we don’t change all that much as we grow older.

But there are other businesses aimed at kids that aren’t exploitative, and can be a part of a child’s development. Peter Ricchiuti's guests on today’s show are in those kinds of businesses.

Chet Overall / It's New Orleans

  In 1814 it was the British who were "runnin' down the Mississippi to the Gulf of Mexico." Today, ships of almost every nationality are steaming down the river to the Gulf. 54 of them belong to International Shipholding. Their fleet of cargo vessels ply international trade from their current headquarters in Mobile, Alabama but they're set to return soon to their original home in New Orleans.