Jesse Hardman

Coastal Reporter

As the new Coastal Reporter, Jesse Hardman will draw on 15 years of worldwide experience in radio, video and print journalism. As a radio reporter he has reported for NPR, BBC, and CBC, and for such familiar programs as MarketplaceThis American LifeLatino USA, and Living on Earth. He served as a daily news reporter and news magazine producer for WBEZ in Chicago. He has worked extensively in Asia, Africa and Latin America, and has reported on New Orleans for Time. At WWNO Jesse has been the creator and producer of The Listening Post, the station’s civic engagement project. He holds degrees from Kenyon College, Ohio, and Harvard University, Massachusetts.


Each month we talk with Richard Campanella about his


Tomorrow marks the anniversary of Hurricane Rita's landfall in Texas and Louisiana. Cameron Parish got hit the hardest by the category 3 storm. Luckily, two days before Rita hit, almost the entire population of Cameron Parish, around 9,500 people, evacuated. Most of the homes and businesses were destroyed or heavily damaged by storm surge and high winds. A third of the population still hasn’t returned.

Jesse Hardman

New Orleans is not on Pope Francis’s itinerary this week when he makes his first official trip to the United States. But the 266th pontiff has excited a lot of New Orleanians with his brand of social justice, and some are even making the trip out East to see him.

Jesse Hardman

Over the last decade more than $14 billion was spent to upgrade New Orleans’s storm protection system. But ask around, and you’ll get a variety of responses as to how safe the city actually is now when it comes to storms and flooding.

Mark Schleifstein is the Environment reporter for | The Times-Picayune. He’s been covering all facets of New Orleans’s attempts to shore up it’s natural and man-made defense systems.

French 75

On Saturday New Orleanians will mark ten years since Hurricane Katrina in a variety of ways.

Chris Hannah is the head bartender at Arnaud’s French 75 in the French Quarter. He’s been behind the bar there all of his 11 years in the city.

Every August 29th Hannah says he makes sure he reunites with roommates and friends from 2005, for dinner and reflection.

Hannah spoke with WWNO's Jesse Hardman about his Katrina anniversary routine.

Terri Coleman, Gentilly resident and teacher at Dillard University
Rush Jagoe

You might have noticed a few cameras around town this week. Yes, the entire media world has descended on New Orleans.


But some reporters began digging around the city much earlier in the summer, in hopes of providing more in depth coverage. Anna Sale is the host of a year-old podcast from WNYC, the public radio station in New York City, called Death Sex & Money. Each episode focuses on one person, and gives them the chance to explore and dissect moments from their lives.

Residents of the Lower 9th Ward attend an unveiling a plaque marking the location of the levee break.
Jesse Hardman


The catastrophic flooding of the Lower 9th Ward now has a commemorative marker.

A plaque was erected last night by 

It’s at the site where a floodwall protecting the neighborhood collapsed, unleashing a wall of water 10 years ago during Hurricane Katrina.

Jesse Hardman

This coming week in New Orleans will be packed with press conferences and commemorations as the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina’s nears. The Lower 9th Ward, considered one of the city's most devastated neighborhoods a decade ago, is seeing more visitors than usual, including city workers and business investors.

Richard Campanella

Each month we talk with Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Times-Picayune. This month the Professor of Geography at the Tulane School of Architecture reflects on the idea of natural disasters and their historic impact on New Orleans.

While Katrina’s 10th Anniversary is taking center stage right now, WWNOs Jesse Hardman sat down with Campanella to talk about another famous hurricane, in 1722, that allowed French city planners to completely redesign the city.

St. Bernard Parish from the air.
Jesse Hardman

A coalition of wetlands restoration advocates are using the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina to push their cause, rebuilding marsh along the Mississippi Delta. The MRGO Must Go Coalition wants to remind local residents that Hurricane Katrina’s impact was largely due to environmental degradation caused by private and public entities.