Jesse Hardman

Coastal Reporter

As the new Coastal Reporter, Jesse Hardman will draw on 15 years of worldwide experience in radio, video and print journalism. As a radio reporter he has reported for NPR, BBC, and CBC, and for such familiar programs as MarketplaceThis American LifeLatino USA, and Living on Earth. He served as a daily news reporter and news magazine producer for WBEZ in Chicago. He has worked extensively in Asia, Africa and Latin America, and has reported on New Orleans for Time. At WWNO Jesse has been the creator and producer of The Listening Post, the station’s civic engagement project. He holds degrees from Kenyon College, Ohio, and Harvard University, Massachusetts.

French 75
https://thehappyfooddance.wordpress.com

On Saturday New Orleanians will mark ten years since Hurricane Katrina in a variety of ways.

Chris Hannah is the head bartender at Arnaud’s French 75 in the French Quarter. He’s been behind the bar there all of his 11 years in the city.

Every August 29th Hannah says he makes sure he reunites with roommates and friends from 2005, for dinner and reflection.

Hannah spoke with WWNO's Jesse Hardman about his Katrina anniversary routine.

Terri Coleman, Gentilly resident and teacher at Dillard University
Rush Jagoe

You might have noticed a few cameras around town this week. Yes, the entire media world has descended on New Orleans.

 

But some reporters began digging around the city much earlier in the summer, in hopes of providing more in depth coverage. Anna Sale is the host of a year-old podcast from WNYC, the public radio station in New York City, called Death Sex & Money. Each episode focuses on one person, and gives them the chance to explore and dissect moments from their lives.

Residents of the Lower 9th Ward attend an unveiling a plaque marking the location of the levee break.
Jesse Hardman

  

The catastrophic flooding of the Lower 9th Ward now has a commemorative marker.

A plaque was erected last night by Levees.org. 

It’s at the site where a floodwall protecting the neighborhood collapsed, unleashing a wall of water 10 years ago during Hurricane Katrina.

Jesse Hardman

This coming week in New Orleans will be packed with press conferences and commemorations as the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina’s nears. The Lower 9th Ward, considered one of the city's most devastated neighborhoods a decade ago, is seeing more visitors than usual, including city workers and business investors.

Richard Campanella

Each month we talk with Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com/The Times-Picayune. This month the Professor of Geography at the Tulane School of Architecture reflects on the idea of natural disasters and their historic impact on New Orleans.

While Katrina’s 10th Anniversary is taking center stage right now, WWNOs Jesse Hardman sat down with Campanella to talk about another famous hurricane, in 1722, that allowed French city planners to completely redesign the city.

St. Bernard Parish from the air.
Jesse Hardman

A coalition of wetlands restoration advocates are using the 10th anniversary of Hurricane Katrina to push their cause, rebuilding marsh along the Mississippi Delta. The MRGO Must Go Coalition wants to remind local residents that Hurricane Katrina’s impact was largely due to environmental degradation caused by private and public entities.

In a lush green bayou a little southeast of New Orleans, John Lopez and Howard Callahan are cruising the waterways in an airboat under the hot Louisiana sun on a recent day.

It's an area known as Breton Basin, and Callahan is a local land manager who often helps researchers such as Lopez explore environmental changes in coastal wetlands. The pair head to a concrete and steel structure that separates the bayou from the nearby Mississippi River.

Jesse Hardman

This week on All Things New Orleans, WWNOs weekly local magazine:

Eve Abrams helps us explore some often used but misunderstand labels being placed on New Orleanians who arrived AFTER the storm. We share our latest episode of our podcast, Katrina: The Debris, focusing on mental health and disasters.

Elizabeth Mahoney, St. Bernard resident and peer counselor.
Brett Anderson

The devastation of Hurricane Katrina and the floods that followed is most visible in pictures of ruined houses and people’s destroyed possessions lying out on city streets. But there’s unseen damage that runs even deeper: the collective emotional trauma experienced by the thousands of people who lived through it.

New Orleans witnessed its 100th murder of 2015 a week ago.  A 29 year-old local man was shot in his car in the French Quarter. The city did not see it’s 100th murder last year until late August.  New Orleans had seen a decline in its murder rate the past three years. 

Charles West is the director of the City of New Orleans Innovation Delivery Team. His unit oversees the Nola For Life program, a neighborhood level initiative that targets communities with high murder rates . 

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