Ian McNulty

Producer

Ian is the host of Where Y’Eat and the Community Impact series at WWNO.

Each week, Ian shares his commentary on the intriguing food culture of New Orleans and south Louisiana with WWNO’s Where Y’Eat. He also shines light on the difference that innovative nonprofits are making across the New Orleans region through WWNO’s Community Impact series, interviewing nonprofit leaders and the people they serve.  Ian first became a WWNO contributor in 2009. He is a freelance journalist and a published author. A native of Rhode Island, Ian is a graduate of Rutgers University. He has lived in New Orleans since 1999.

"The bomb," a sepecialty po-boy at Guy's Po-Boys in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Guy’s Po-boys was closed for months earlier this year after a vehicle plowed through its front door late one night. Guy’s is back open now, but a group of fellow po-boy purveyors decided to hold a fundraiser to support its proprietor after losing out on so much business during the repairs. It will be a street party with a purpose, powered by po-boys.

See details below:

The name Creole tomato can turn heads in the market place this time of year.
Ian McNulty

This time of year, if you haven’t seen a Creole tomato it’s probably right behind you.

Summer is revving up, so these ultra-seasonal beauties are everywhere, big red orbs tumbling from bins at farmers markets and fruit stands and grocery stores.

Eat Local Challenge

In the weeks ahead, you may start seeing a different side of local food, one that might include the innovative, the overlooked or underutilized, and even the invasive.

The bar at Tujague's Restaurant, a New Orleans restaurant marking its 160th anniversary.
Ian McNulty

Give any restaurant enough time and an institutional history will accrue. Give it as much time as Tujague's has on the clock, and it can develop its own lore and legends and even some dichotomies that might seem like contradictions but end up defining the place.

Restaurants near the Lafitte Greenway are seeing a different kind of customer since the bike path opened. Po-boy purveyor Parkway Tavern & Bakery is one of them.
Ian McNulty

Look around the streets of New Orleans these days and it's impossible to miss that more people are traversing the city on bicycles.

Some restaurants and bars are noticing too, and nowhere more than a part of Mid-City that's becoming a crossroads of bike paths, a destination for in-town outings and, on nice days, a hub for people making the rounds by pedal power.

Blue Oak BBQ opened recently in Mid-City, the latest in a growing number of serious barbecue purveyors in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

Is New Orleans a barbecue town? For a long time, the answer was generally, even if grudgingly, no. But times are changing.

McNulty family photo

This one is about mothers who work hard, have to juggle, still get dinner on the table, and the kids who don't really get it at the time but end up loving them even more once they finally do.

Crawfish Monica is one of the classic tastes of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.
Ian McNulty

The food served up around the Fair Grounds each year at the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival isn’t typical event food. It is specifically Jazz Fest food. It rarely changes and as a result Jazz Fest regulars anticipate and crave certain dishes each year as part of their festival experience.

Primitivo is part of a new wave of business redevelopment along O.C. Haley Boulevard in the Central City neighborhood of New Orleans
Ian McNulty

The restaurant Primitivo is turning heads with some very old techniques in the kitchen, making this restaurant writer reassess some assumptions and, along the way, drawing more attention to a long-neglected business district in New Orleans.

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