Eve Abrams

Producer

Eve Abrams first fell in love with stories listening to her grandmother tell them; it’s been an addiction ever since.

Eve is a radio producer, writer, audio documentarian, and educator. Her work airs on WWNO, as well as on national programs such as the Tavis Smiley Show, Studio 360, The World, and This American Life. Her writing is published in the 2010 collection Where We Know: New Orleans as Home, as well as in Fourth Genre, Wesleyan Magazine, and the forthcoming New Orleans atlas, Unfathomable City. She is also the co-author of the book Preservation Hall.

Eve has taught in public and charter schools, both in New Orleans and New York City, and currently teaches writing at the Waldo Burton School and an audio workshop at Tulane University.

Jonathan Traviesa

Over the course of 2013, I interviewed dozens and dozens of folks who live, or once lived, in the neighborhoods along both sides of St. Claude Avenue, roughly from St. Bernard to Poland Avenue. I asked them to share stories of their neighborhoods, what they’re like now, how they’ve changed, and how they feel about those changes. These voices became the makings of this seven-part radio documentary: Along Saint Claude.

Part 2: A Brief History Lesson

Jonathan Traviesa

Over the course of 2013, I interviewed dozens and dozens of folks who live, or once lived, in the neighborhoods along both sides of St. Claude Avenue, roughly from St. Bernard to Poland Avenue. I asked them to share stories of their neighborhoods, what they’re like now, how they’ve changed, and how they feel about those changes. These voices became the makings of this seven-part radio documentary: Along Saint Claude.

Part 1: What's in a Name

Kate Gegenheimer

The Music and Culture Coalition of New Orleans serves as a platform and voice for issues concerning culture in New Orleans.

Along Saint Claude

Apr 11, 2014
Jonathan Traviesa

Over the course of 2013, I interviewed dozens and dozens of folks who live, or once lived, in the neighborhoods along both sides of St. Claude Avenue, roughly from St. Bernard to Poland Avenue. I asked them to share stories of their neighborhoods, what they’re like now, how they’ve changed, and how they feel about those changes. These voices became the makings of this seven-part radio documentary: Along Saint Claude.

Courtesy of Barbara Hawkins

Fifty years ago the Beatles crossed over to America, and it seemed no one could unseat them from the top of the charts. But three girls from New Orleans' Calliope housing project did just that, edging out the Fab Four in 1964 to score a #1 Billboard hit.

The Dixie Cups' "Chapel of Love" featured the harmonies of sisters Barbara Ann and Rosa Lee Hawkins, along with their cousin Joan Marie Johnson. Though Hurricane Katrina took them from New Orleans, they’re back to play French Quarter Fest this Saturday at 2 p.m. This is the story of their enduring hit.

 

Eve Abrams

When Logan Crowe became Principal of Andrew H. Wilson Charter School three years ago, the school had fewer than 10 non-English-speaking students.

Crowe actively recruited native Spanish speakers from New Orleans' swelling Latino population, and this year Wilson has 61 English as a Second Language students enrolled... but no funds to hire a full time ESL teacher.

Sister Juanita Wood, a bilingual nun near retirement, volunteered for the task and is paid a part-time stipend.

Eve Abrams / WWNO

One idea behind charter schools is that they operate with few outside restrictions. They can play around with curriculum, the structure of the school day and staffing. Teachers unions tend to create restrictions on things like hours and duties in order to protect the people who work in schools.

Morris Jeff Community School is the first charter school in Louisiana to form a teachers union that’s recognized by the school’s board. In fact, at Morris Jeff the very term teachers union has a whole new meaning.

Eve Abrams / WWNO

In 2006, shortly after the floods that followed Katrina, one city plan advised turning the neighborhood of Broadmoor into a drainage park. Residents of the low-lying area had other ideas, and prevailed.

Today Broadmoor is not only thriving as a neighborhood, it wants to be an educational hub for the city. The neighborhood's vast array of programs expand the very idea of what education means.

The buzz of café sound greets you as soon as you step through the sleek, rectangular building at the intersection of Broad, Fountainbleu and Napoleon.

Eve Abrams / WWNO

Pop Quiz: Which New Orleans official was first elected to office in 1974 and has been reelected to that same office nine times, serving a total of 40 consecutive years on the job? Here’s a hint: the office is in charge of mental health commitments, sexual assault examinations, and... classifying the dead.

If you guessed Frank Minyard, the Coroner of New Orleans, you are right. But, for the first time in four decades, Mr. Minyard will not be on the ballot this Saturday. We take a look into who is vying to become New Orleans’ next coroner.

Akili Acadmey

Just after Hurricane Katrina, the entire teaching staff of The Orleans Parish School Board was fired. Last week, a state appeals court ruled that those teachers were denied due process.

As the school system has rebuilt, there’s been a seismic shift in who is teaching in New Orleans — the city-wide pool of teachers looks different, in terms of race, age, how they came to the teaching profession, how long they’ve been teaching, and whether they are “from” New Orleans, or not.

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