Eve Abrams

Producer

Eve Abrams first fell in love with stories listening to her grandmother tell them; it’s been an addiction ever since.

Eve is a radio producer, writer, audio documentarian, and educator. Her work airs on WWNO, as well as on national programs such as the Tavis Smiley Show, Studio 360, The World, and This American Life. Her writing is published in the 2010 collection Where We Know: New Orleans as Home, as well as in Fourth Genre, Wesleyan Magazine, and the forthcoming New Orleans atlas, Unfathomable City. She is also the co-author of the book Preservation Hall.

Eve has taught in public and charter schools, both in New Orleans and New York City, and currently teaches writing at the Waldo Burton School and an audio workshop at Tulane University.

Courtesy of StoryCorps

As part of our StoryCorps series on criminal justice, we bring you a conversation between social workers.

Noelle Deltufo and Ginger Parsons are close friends who worked together as social workers for the OPD - Orleans Public Defenders. They discuss the emotional labor that comes with social work and more broadly about systemic injustice.


Courtesy of StoryCorps

As part of our StoryCorps series on criminal justice, we bring you this conversation on growing up in New Orleans.

Courtesy of StoryCorps

As part of our StoryCorps series on criminal justice, we bring you a story about re-adjusting to life on the outside.

Kenneth Dilosa, Tyronne Smith, and Ben Smith helped found a reentry organization called "The First 72+". Located in the shadow of the new jail, it was created by formerly incarcerated people to help others transition out of prison and build for the future. Their motto is: "us helping us".

Courtesy of StoryCorps

As part of our StoryCorps series on criminal justice, we bring you this conversation between two young attorneys.

William Snowden and Barksdale Hortenstine met through their job at Orleans Public Defenders. They're both in their 30's. Barksdale is white; William is not. They talk about implicit bias and how it relates to the criminal justice system.

Courtesy: Center for Investigative Reporting

For several months, independent producer Eve Abrams, of Unprisoned, and WWNO news director Eve Troeh have been learning about and reporting on funding for public defense, and a drastic measure taken by the Orleans Parish Chief Public Defender this year.

The result: an hour-long collaboration with Reveal, from the Center for Investigative Reporting and PRX.

Listen here to "If You Can't Afford a Lawyer."

Or catch it on 89.9 WWNO Thursday, December 8 at 8 p.m. or Friday, December 9 at 1 p.m.

Now that Marlene Kennedy finally has her own apartment, she doesn't have to worry where she'll sleep each night.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Louisiana is the incarceration capital of the world. But most people behind bars aren’t locked up forever. In fact, 90 percent of them will someday be released. So that makes Louisiana also the reentry capital of the world-- a role the state is ill-prepared for.

Calvin Manny Hills and his oldest sister, Johnnie Mae Hills Sylve, get together for a Father's Day party.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

In nearly every state, prison populations have exploded -- in large part, because of drug laws and the people, like Manny Hills, who are arrested and incarcerated for those laws. Over the last 25 years, Manny, an addict, has been convicted several times for drug possession and other petty crimes. His story is pretty typical of the people who fill up our nation's prisons.

15-year-old Jewel Williams, in Sunny Summer's third period English class at Sci High.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Over the last forty years, as incarceration has surged across the nation, so has the number of children with a family member in prison. According to the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the number of young people with a father in prison rose 500 percent between 1980 and 2000.


Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards at the rally at the Capitol on Youth Justice Day.
Sarah Hunt / Louisiana Center for Children's Rights

At all levels of government right now, laws about juveniles are rapidly changing. However, some states, including Louisiana, continue to prosecute and sentence juveniles for sentences of life without parole.

Asha Lane, high school senior.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Asha Lane is an 18-year-old senior at the International High School of New Orleans, a charter high school. Asha wanted to find out why New Orleans charter schools don’t always feel nurturing. We live in a dangerous city, but when does security feel unsafe?

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