Carrie Johnson

COASTAL DESK

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The Working Coast: Economic Downturn Strains Louisiana's Long Relationship With Oil And Gas

A sudden drop in oil prices last year has brought huge challenges to the state of Louisiana — more than 10,000 layoffs in the oil and gas sector and a $400 million hit to the state budget. Long known for its “working coast” — represented by shipping, fishing and industry in south Louisiana and along the Mississippi River — the downturn brings with it something of an identity crisis.
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TRIPOD: NEW ORLEANS AT 300

The Historic New Orleans Collection

'The Monster': Claiborne Avenue Before And After The Interstate

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part two of its highway series. This is the story of the I-10 interstate bridge that sits above Claiborne Avenue. Part one of this story was about the proposed Riverfront Expressway through the French Quarter and along the Mississippi River. That leg of the highway did not happen, and the French Quarter was saved from being demolished under a freeway. But that same year, 1968, a different section of the Riverfront Expressway did go up. Under that part? The Treme neighborhood, along Claiborne Avenue.
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NPR NEWS

'El Chapo' Extradition To U.S. May Proceed, Mexican Judge Says

Two days after drug lord Joaquin "El Chapo" Guzmán was transferred to a prison near Juárez, a Mexican city near the U.S. border, a federal judge in Mexico said the extradition process can move forward.An unnamed judge said the "legal requirements laid out in the extradition treaty" between the U.S. and Mexico had been met, The Associated Press reports, adding that Mexico's foreign ministry has 20 days to approve the extradition.NPR's Carrie Kahn reported in January that Guzmán had been ...
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Tegan Wendland / WWNO

A sudden drop in oil prices last year has brought huge challenges to the state of Louisiana — more than 10,000 layoffs in the oil and gas sector and a $400 million hit to the state budget. Long known for its “working coast” — represented by shipping, fishing and industry in south Louisiana and along the Mississippi River — the downturn brings with it something of an identity crisis.

This week on Le Show: Harry Shearer gets a call from Donald Trump, B-Rock's Water Warehouse, News of NiceCorp, Tales from Airport Security, News of the Godly, Follow the DollarLet Us Try, and more!

This Continuum presents unique contemporary performances of medieval music in accordance with the modern revival of music from this period, hence the name, Neo-Medieval. The three ensembles are have been highly praised for their approaches to performing this music. All are different from each other but each gives excellent interpretations of the selections. Recordings used are: Sapphire Night  (Tapestry) - MDG 344 1193-2, Neo-Medieval (Hesperus) - Dorian DIS 80155, and Darkness Into Light (Anonymous 4) - Harmonia Mundi HMU 907274.

Rodrigo Mondragon and host Poppy Tooker. Rodrigo is co-owner of Ki’ Mexico, a Shreveport restaurant he runs with members of his family.
Chris Jay

On this week's show, we journey across the state to learn about the flourishing flavors of Latin American cuisine in Louisiana.

This week on Inside the Arts, one of the world's rarest books lands in New Orleans. The nationally traveling exhibit, First Folio! The Book That Gave Us Shakespeare opens Uptown at the Newcomb Art Museum.

Courtesy Richard Campanella

Each month we hear from Richard Campanella about his Cityscapes column for Nola.com | The Times-Picayune. This time, WWNO’s Eve Troeh talks to him about how New Orleans started “going Greek” in architecture, with the Greek Revival movement hitting the city in the early 1800s.

Although New Orleans has religious universities, public and private universities, and historically black colleges and universities which - taken together - have very diverse student bodies, the city lacks diversity in its higher education faculty.

McNulty family photo

This one is about mothers who work hard, have to juggle, still get dinner on the table, and the kids who don't really get it at the time but end up loving them even more once they finally do.

Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

If you’ve ever had folks come visit you in New Orleans from out of town, they’ve probably said, “If I lived here I’d put on a hundred pounds.”

This Out to Lunch is all about how to kick ass, and what to do after your ass gets kicked.

The Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with part two of its highway series. This is the story of the I-10 interstate bridge that sits above Claiborne Avenue.

Part one of this story was about the proposed Riverfront Expressway through the French Quarter and along the Mississippi River. That leg of the highway did not happen, and the French Quarter was saved from being demolished under a freeway. But that same year, 1968, a different section of the Riverfront Expressway did go up. Under that part? The Treme neighborhood, along Claiborne Avenue.

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LOUISIANA EATS!

Rodrigo Mondragon and host Poppy Tooker. Rodrigo is co-owner of Ki’ Mexico, a Shreveport restaurant he runs with members of his family.
Chris Jay

South Of The Border With Louisiana Eats

On this week's show, we journey across the state to learn about the flourishing flavors of Latin American cuisine in Louisiana.
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CLASSICAL MUSIC

Classical Music on WWNO

Beautiful classical music, from traditional to contemporary, on Classical WWNO.

LE SHOW

Le Show For The Week Of May 8, 2016

This week on Le Show: Harry Shearer gets a call from Donald Trump, B-Rock's Water Warehouse, News of NiceCorp, Tales from Airport Security, News of the Godly, Follow the Dollar, Let Us Try, and more!
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Carrie Johnson is a Justice Correspondent for the Washington Desk.

She covers a wide variety of stories about justice issues, law enforcement and legal affairs for NPR's flagship programs Morning Edition and All Things Considered, as well as the Newscasts and NPR.org.

While in this role, Johnson has chronicled major challenges to the landmark voting rights law, a botched law enforcement operation targeting gun traffickers along the Southwest border, and the Obama administration's deadly drone program for suspected terrorists overseas.

Prior to coming to NPR in 2010, Johnson worked at the Washington Post for 10 years, where she closely observed the FBI, the Justice Department and criminal trials of the former leaders of Enron, HealthSouth and Tyco. Earlier in her career, she wrote about courts for the weekly publication Legal Times.

Outside of her role at NPR, Johnson regularly moderates or appears on legal panels for the American Bar Association, the American Constitution Society, the National Association of Criminal Defense Lawyers, and others. She's talked about her work on CNN, MSNBC, Fox News, PBS, and other outlets.

Her work has been honored with awards from the Society for Professional Journalists and the Society of American Business Editors and Writers. She has been a finalist for the Loeb award for financial journalism and for the Pulitzer Prize in breaking news for team coverage of the massacre at Fort Hood, Texas.

Johnson is a graduate of the University of Wisconsin-Madison and Benedictine University in Illinois.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

A bipartisan task force created by Congress issued "an urgent call to action" Tuesday to overhaul the nation's federal prisons and reduce the number of U.S. inmates by 60,000 over the next decade.

For months, FBI Director James Comey has been warning about a troubling spike in homicides in some of America's biggest cities.

On Tuesday, the bureau released preliminary crime statistics that back up some of his concerns. The FBI reported that violent crime rose in the first six months of 2015, with murders increasing by more than 6 percent over that same stretch the year before.

It's not every day the White House and Republican leaders in Congress have a meeting of the minds.

But before he left for the holidays, the president singled out an issue he considers ripe for compromise next year. "I still want to work with Congress, both Democrats and Republicans, to reform our criminal justice system," President Obama said.

Republican House Speaker Paul Ryan has been sounding a hopeful note, too, telling an audience recently: "I do believe that there are things where we can find common ground on next; criminal justice reform is a good example."

The Commonwealth Court in Pennsylvania unanimously ruled Wednesday that a state law that prevents convicted criminals from getting full-time jobs in nursing homes or long-term-care facilities is unconstitutional.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

And let's bring in another voice here. It's actually another Johnson. It's my colleague, NPR justice correspondent Carrie Johnson. She's been listening. And, Carrie, good morning.

CARRIE JOHNSON, BYLINE: Good morning, David.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The jurors who will be chosen to hear the first case against a police officer charged in the death of Freddie Gray in Baltimore will be anonymous, at least for now.

A judge has ruled that their identities can be shielded from the public. That practice is controversial, but not unheard of in high-profile cases.

The bipartisan effort to overhaul the criminal justice system for drug offenders has hit a speed bump.

Some members of Congress are trying to tie those lighter punishments for drug defendants to a new bill that the Justice Department says would make it harder to prosecute a range of crimes from food safety to business fraud.

The plan, passed by voice vote by the House Judiciary Committee to little notice last week, would require prosecutors to prove guilt to a higher standard in many cases, by default.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

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