State and National News

Interscope Geffen A&M CEO says industry has got to figure out streaming

21 hours ago
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Kai Ryssdal and Bridget Bodnar

When John Janick was an undergrad, he started a record company out of his dorm room called Fueled by Ramen. It went on to represent artists like Jimmy Eat World and Fall Out Boy, then later Panic! at the Disco, fun. and Paramore. Now he runs a considerably bigger company as the CEO of Interscope Geffen A&M Records. Janick was hand-picked by Jimmy Iovine to be the music industry legend's successor.

Koshary is to Egyptian cuisine as the pyramids are to its culture. Emblematic. Iconic. Beloved.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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2/22/2017: Let's talk about coal, again

22 hours ago
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Scott Tong

We’ve been hearing a lot about coal lately. Coal mining country came out strong for Trump, who has been promising to bring back mining jobs. We discuss the reality of the boom-and-bust industry with residents in one Illinois town who wonder if they’d be better off without it. From the latest installment of Corner Office, we’ll hear the unlikely story of how the “La La Land” soundtrack came to be from the man who made it happen: John Janick, CEO of Interscope Geffen A&M Records. Plus, how closely are you being watched at work?

Fake news has been, well, in the news a lot lately. But for the world's largest crowdsourced encyclopedia, it's nothing new.

"Wikipedia has been dealing with fake news since it started 16 years ago," notes LiAnna Davis, deputy director of the Wiki Education Foundation.

02/22/17: Watching $100 million go down the drain

23 hours ago

We're exploring the financial turmoil that ABB, a Swiss engineering group, is currently facing. The company may lose $100 million because of a criminal scheme at a South Korean subsidiary. Next, we'll talk about a turnaround for U.S. coal mining companies and then take a closer look at one small California community where arsenic is contaminating its groundwater. 

Treating people for free or for very little money has been the role of community health centers across the U.S. for decades. In 2015, 1 in 12 Americans sought care at one of these clinics; nearly 6 in 10 were women, and hundreds of thousands were veterans.

For Michael Childers, ice makes getting around a little easier.

When it's thick enough, the ice on Lake Superior creates a makeshift road between Bayfield, Wis., and Madeline Island, the small resort island where Childers and about 250 others live year-round.

But for the second year in a row, warmer winters have made it necessary for the ferries that usually don't operate during winter to continue to run.

It's a chilly midmorning in a clinic in the working-class neighborhood of Sweileh in Amman, Jordan. Children wearing winter coats donated by charity organizations sit on plastic chairs, waiting to see doctors and dentists.

Pamphlets in the clinic, published by the Muslim Brotherhood, offer advice on being a good Muslim and instruction on how to pray. But it's not really religion that brings people here.

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