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Wait Wait...Don't Tell Me!
4:21 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Singer Erykah Badu Plays Not My Job

Karl Walter Getty Images

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 4:47 pm

This week, Wait Wait comes to you from the AT&T Performing Arts Center in the Dallas Arts District. Turns out, singer Erykah Badu was a student at the high school for the performing arts directly across the street. We're guessing she used to gaze across the street and say to herself: "Someday I'm going to be in a theater that's not yet built, performing on a public radio news quiz." And today, that dream comes true.

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Simon Says
4:21 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Vive La Scandale! French Lawmakers Caught In The Act (Of Playing Scrabble)

French Justice Minister Christiane Taubira speaks to the French National Assembly on Jan. 29, the first day of debate on the government project to legalize same-sex marriage and adoption for same-sex couples.
Remy de la Mauviniere AP

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 11:11 am

How many points do you get for the word "scandale"?

A sidelight scandale flared in France this week after a deputy in the French National Assembly was shown playing Scrabble on his iPad during the ongoing debate over same-sex marriage.

Among the words that could be deciphered in photographs were "gache," which is French for wasted, and "mufle," which is cad or oaf.

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Books
4:20 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Life, Love And Undeath In The 'Lemon Grove'

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 11:11 am

Karen Russell has a new short-story collection out, her first book since 2011's best-selling Swamplandia! The stories range from senior citizen vampires sucking lemons and wondering about their future, to a war veteran whose wounds are both locked up inside, and bright and bold across his body.

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Author Interviews
4:20 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Healing 'Brick City': A Newark Doctor Returns Home

Sampson Davis was born and raised in Newark, N.J. He is an emergency medicine physician and a founder, with two childhood friends, of The Three Doctors Foundation.
Rainer Hosch Spiegel&Grau

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 11:11 am

When Sampson Davis was in high school, he and two of his friends made a pact that they would someday become doctors. All three of them did. Along with those friends — and now fellow doctors — George Jenkins and Rameck Hunt, Davis co-authored a 2003 book called The Pact, about that promise and the way it shaped their lives.

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Books
4:20 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Literary Types Find Love In 'The New York Review Of Books'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 11:11 am

There are a lot of places these days to look for all kinds of love, especially online. But what's an aging intellectual who loves William Gass, Philip Glass and a good merlot to do?

The distinguished New York Review of Books celebrates its 50th anniversary this month. It is noted for its rigorous writing and stellar cerebral lit stars — and its personal ads.

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Theater
4:19 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

The Scottish Play (The Olivier Way)

Laurence Olivier, seen here in his film adaptation of Shakespeare's Hamlet, also intended to create a film version of Macbeth.
Anonymous AP

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 11:11 am

Laurence Olivier, whose interpretations of Shakespeare's signature roles were often considered definitive, adapted several of those roles for film. He wrote and directed widely praised versions of Hamlet, Henry V and Richard III.

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Book Reviews
4:19 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

A Pale Imitation Of Magic In 'Scent Of Darkness'

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 6:03 am

Over the years, I've come to the conclusion that what's generally referred to — often disdainfully — as "women's fiction" (not quite literature, not quite romance, definitely not Fifty Shades of Grey) is really a catch-all category into which almost any literary genre will fit.

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Krulwich Wonders...
4:17 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Yes, Cats Know How To Fall On Their Feet. But These Guys Do It Better

Agence Nature Science Source

Originally published on Sat February 9, 2013 3:59 am

The champ has met its challenger.

Drop a cat and it will swing its head to a horizontal, rearrange its rear, arch its back, splay its legs, and — amazingly often — land on its feet.

This is what cats do. They're famous for it. But now they have a rival.

This is an aphid.

Aphids spend their days sucking sap from leaves. Those leaves can be high off the ground. "High" of course, being a relative term, but think of it this way: Five feet high up is 381 aphids tall. Which is why things get so dicey when a ladybug comes by.

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Favorite Sessions
4:16 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

John Mark Nelson: A Teenager With Serious Talent

John Mark Nelson performs live on The Current in the Twin Cities.
Nate Ryan The Current

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 3:27 pm

When people hear John Mark Nelson's music for the first time, there's often a sense of disbelief. With arrangements that recall the work of veteran songwriters, the 19-year-old Minnetonka, Minn., native has been recording sophisticated compositions since he was 14.

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The Two-Way
4:16 pm
Mon February 11, 2013

Time-Lapse Video: A 'Meteorological Bomb' In The Making

A massive winter storm is coming together as two low pressure systems are merging over the U.S. East Coast. A satellite image from NOAA's GOES-13 satellite on Feb. 8 shows a western frontal system approaching the coastal low pressure area.
NASA

Originally published on Fri February 8, 2013 6:09 pm

We've told you that blizzard moving across the New England today may be historic.

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