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BackTalk
11:06 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Who Should We Honor On Presidents' Day?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

And now it's time for BackTalk. That's where we lift the curtain on what's happening in the TELL ME MORE blogosphere. Editor Ammad Omar is with us. What's going on today, Ammad?

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Economy
11:06 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Could Minimum Wage Increase Boom Or Bust Economy?

President Obama's plan to jump-start the economy starts with increasing the minimum wage and avoiding sequestration. Host Michel Martin talks about those challenges and others, like rising gas prices and expanding waist lines. She's joined by NPR's senior business editor Marilyn Geewax and Wall Street Journal economics reporter Sudeep Reddy.

The Picture Show
10:51 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Midnight In The Garden Of Long Exposures

Hanami (flower viewing), Sakura (Cherry Blossom Festival), Maruyama Park, Kyoto, Japan
Diane Cook and Len Jenshel National Geographic

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 12:04 pm

Feeble human eyes require a certain level of light to see color. Cameras, though, have the magical ability to expose the world at night. Husband-and-wife photographers Diane Cook and Len Jenshel have been playing with long-exposure photography for years — more specifically, in moonlit gardens.

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NPR Story
10:49 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Carving Up The Elephant: Resegregation In Louisiana

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 8:58 am

It’s been nearly 60 years since the landmark Brown v. Board of Education decision, and the subsequent flurry of lawsuits forcing the desegregation of schools. Two recent studies—one from Stanford University, the other from UCLA—say that schools, particularly in the South, are becoming re-segregated after the lawsuits are settled. Louisiana’s East Baton Rouge Parish appears to be part of that pattern.

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Business
10:38 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Native American Tribes Venture Out Of Casino Business

The Mille Lacs Band says it'€™s putting profits from its casinos into a hotel venture in downtown St. Paul, Minn. The move is to diversify the tribe'€™s business.
Conrad Wilson Minnesota Public Radio

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 9:26 am

Nearly half of all Native American tribes across the country are benefiting from casinos and other gaming revenues. For most, it's their largest source of income. But growing threats to that revenue due to competition from non-Indian gaming are forcing many tribes to look for other investment opportunities.

In a dramatic example of that diversification, one group of Native Americans is buying nearly half the hotel rooms in Minnesota's capital.

A Big Business Shift

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Music News
10:38 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Where Does The Harlem Shake Actually Come From?

G Dep in "Let's Get It."
Vimeo

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 9:26 am

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The Salt
10:37 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Former Peanut Firm Executives Indicted Over 2009 Salmonella Outbreak

A sign outside the Peanut Corp. of America's processing plant in Blakely, Ga.
Ric Feld AP

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 9:26 am

Four former executives from Peanut Corp. of America and a related company are facing federal criminal charges for covering up information that their peanut butter was contaminated with salmonella bacteria.

The charges are related to a nationwide outbreak of salmonella back in 2009. More than 700 people became ill, and federal investigators traced the source of the bacteria to peanut butter manufactured in Blakely, Ga., by the Peanut Corp. of America. The company is no longer in business.

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World Cafe
10:36 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Latin Roots: Merengue

Merengue musician Wilfrido Vargas.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 3:45 pm

In this segment of Latin Roots from World Cafe, Grammy-winning Latin music producer Aaron Levinson and host David Dye ourney through the world of merengue music, starting with its roots in the Dominican Republic.

Largely influenced by the dictator Rafael Trujillo to celebrate his political agenda, merengue is a form of fast-paced, rhythmic music. Utilizing diatonic accordions, tamboras and the güira, traditional merengue bands have induced listeners around the world to move with the sounds of the tropical beat.

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NPR Story
10:36 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Questions About North Korea? What To Read To Understand

Few understand the complexities of the isolated nation North Korea.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Fri February 22, 2013 10:06 am

North Korea's third test of nuclear devices turned the eyes of the world onto the isolated nation and heightened fears that the country could become a nuclear power. The North Korean government emphasized that the goal of these tests is to eventually target the United States, "the sworn enemy of the Korean people."

The history of the country and the circumstances that created this animosity toward the U.S. remain unknown to many Americans.

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Shots - Health News
10:30 am
Fri February 22, 2013

Parents, Just Say No To Sharing Tales Of Drug Use With Kids

Have a talk about avoiding drug use early and often. And don't overshare.
iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Mon February 25, 2013 6:55 am

It's a moment many parents dread — sitting down to talk with their kid about drugs. What should they say? Will the conversation have any effect? And should they mention their own youthful indiscretions?

Parents can get advice from the family doctor or pediatrician and places like the Partnership at Drugfree.org (formerly the Partnership for a Drug-Free America), though there's not been much evidence to back up the recommendations.

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