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The Two-Way
3:49 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

Colorado Governor Signs Civil Unions Into Law

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 8:04 pm

Gay couples in Colorado can soon enter into civil unions.

There were cheers as Gov. John Hickenlooper signed Senate Bill 11 at the History Colorado Center near the Capitol.

Here's more from The Associated Press:

"Civil unions grant gay couples rights similar to marriage, including enhanced inheritance and parental rights. People in civil unions also would have the ability to make medical decisions for their partners.

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Movie Reviews
3:49 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

'Olympus Has Fallen' (Into Cold-War Traps)

Mike Banning (Gerard Butler) and U.S. President Ben Asher (Aaron Eckhart) flee a destroyed White House in the military-political thriller Olympus Has Fallen.
FilmDistrict

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 6:19 pm

It's probably best not to think of Olympus Has Fallen as a movie released in 2013. Antoine Fuqua's film — about a band of North Koreans who invade the White House — feels from start to finish like a throwback to the action cinema and military thrillers of decades past.

It's like an ersatz reproduction of an archaeological relic, if the archaeologists in question had just thrown together a bunch of random artifacts from different eras, taken a blurry photograph and then asked someone to make an accurate model based only on their memory of that photograph.

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Movie Reviews
3:47 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

A 'Hunky Dory' High School Musical

Free-spirited drama teacher Viv (Minnie Driver) hopes to use a summer musical production of The Tempest to give her students a chance to express themselves in Hunky Dory.
Variance Films

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 6:03 pm

Set in a seaside town in Wales in the summer of 1976 — the U.K.'s warmest summer on record — Hunky Dory follows the passion project of Vivienne (Minnie Driver), a free-spirited high school teacher who wants her senior students to stage an unconventional production of The Tempest that David Bowie would be proud of. When Viv promises contemporary music and a freer classroom environment, the students are sold. That is, until the last two weeks of school arrive.

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Deceptive Cadence
3:47 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

Remembering Risë Stevens, A Star Of Opera And Pop Culture

The late American mezzo-soprano Risë Stevens in her signature role as Carmen.
Courtesy of the Metropolitan Opera

Originally published on Fri March 22, 2013 9:59 am

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Movie Reviews
3:46 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

'No Place On Earth': Underground, A Story Of Survival

Sam and Saul Stermer, members of a family who hid in an underground Ukrainian cave in the early days of World War II, return to the hideout in No Place on Earth.
Magnolia Pictures

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 4:03 pm

Christopher Nicola, the avid spelunker who introduces No Place on Earth, has an appetite for the dramatic.

"Every cave I enter has a secret," he intones, as the documentary cuts between Nicola's New York City home and his progress through tight underground passages.

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Movie Reviews
3:45 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

An 'Admission' That Moms Might Not Know Best

High-strung Princeton University admissions counselor Portia (Tina Fey) finds old love — and a surrendered child — when she visits the Vermont prep school where old schoolmate John (Paul Rudd) is a teacher.
David Lee Focus Features

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 4:08 pm

Half an hour into Paul Weitz's new comedy, Admission, it dawned on me that I was watching an Americanized About a Boy -- which admittedly was also directed by Weitz. Both movies are adapted from other people's novels; both cobble together families out of the waifs and strays of modern life.

But where About a Boy was both funny and wise about urban alienation, Admission settles for skin deep.

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Movie Reviews
3:44 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

'Gimme The Loot': The Tagger's Life, Lightly

Sofia (Tashiana Washington) and Malcolm (Ty Hickson) are two hardworking graffiti artists with a romantic chemistry that only they don't notice in Gimme the Loot.
Sundance Selects

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 4:03 pm

For the Bronx graffiti artists of Gimme the Loot, Adam Leon's sweet, vibrant debut feature, "Bombing the Apple" is the holy grail of tagging achievements.

"The Apple" in question is the protuberance that emerges from behind the center-right wall in Shea Stadium — they refuse to acknowledge the corporate name Citi Field — every time a New York Mets player hits a home run.

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Mountain Stage
3:44 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

Brooke Waggoner On Mountain Stage

Brooke Waggoner performing live at Mountain Stage.
Brian Blauser Mountain Stage

Originally published on Fri June 20, 2014 4:23 pm

Singer-songwriter Brooke Waggoner makes her third appearance on Mountain Stage, recorded live at the Culture Center Theater in Charleston, W.Va. A native of Louisiana, Waggoner earned a degree in music composition and orchestration from Louisiana State University. She had long been set on scoring music for cinema and television, but eventually began focusing on her own projects.

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Law
3:44 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

At 'Stop-And-Frisk' Trial, Cops Describe Quota-Driven NYPD

Adhyl Polanco, an eight-year police veteran (shown with lawyer Jonathan Moore, right), testified that if certain quotas were not met, an officer could be denied days off and overtime, and be given a poor evaluation.
Margot Adler NPR

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 5:00 pm

Police officers testifying at a federal trial challenging New York City's stop-and-frisk policy say they were ordered to increase their number of arrests, summons and 250s — the code for stop, question and frisk.

Some 5 million street stops of mostly black and Latino men have taken place in the city in the last decade.

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Music Interviews
3:42 pm
Sun March 24, 2013

Baba Salah: A Malian Musician Speaks To His Nation's Displaced

Baba Salah at his home in Bamako, Mali. On his new album, Dangay, he calls attention to what he describes as human-rights violations in the north.
Ed Alcock Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Thu March 21, 2013 7:33 pm

It's Friday night in Bamako, and a club in the Malian capital has come alive. Guitarist and singer Baba Salah is on the floor.

His hometown of Gao, along the banks of the River Niger on the fringes of the Sahara Desert, made headlines as the first city in the north to be liberated by French-backed Malian forces in January. Gao was one of three regional centers in the north captured by rebels and jihadis a year ago. Islamists warned musicians that their tongues would be sliced out if they continued to sing and play. Speaking in French, Salah says artists left in a hurry.

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