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The Sunday Conversation
3:13 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

One Amputee's Message Of Hope For Boston's Bombing Victims

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 3:56 pm

As Lindsay Ess watched the events in Boston unfold last week, she wondered if she could help the victims of the Marathon bombing. When she found out that many had lost limbs in the explosion, she knew she could.

Ess is a quadruple amputee. In 2006, she was diagnosed with Crohn's disease. She underwent surgery for her condition, but it went terribly wrong. She developed septic shock, which lead to complete organ failure. She was in the intensive care unit for five months.

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Krulwich Wonders...
3:08 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

A Wet Towel In Space Is Not Like A Wet Towel On Earth

YouTube

Originally published on Mon May 13, 2013 9:20 am

You just don't know (because who's going to tell you?) that when you leave Earth, travel outside its gravitational reach, hundreds and hundreds of everyday things — stuff you've never had to think about — will change. Like ... oh, how about a wet washcloth?

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Art & Design
3:08 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

When Sculpting Cedar, This Artist Is Tireless And Unsentimental

Michael Bodycomb Ursula von Rydingsvard/Galerie Lelong

Originally published on Mon April 29, 2013 9:42 pm

Ursula von Rydingsvard makes huge sculptures out of red cedar. The 70-year-old is one of the few women working in wood on such a scale.

Her pieces are in the permanent collections of New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art and Museum of Modern Art. And now they're also part of a new show at Manhattan's Museum of Arts and Design. It's called "Against the Grain" — a phrase that could just as well describe the sculptor's life and career.

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Author Interviews
3:08 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Fire, Water, Air, Earth: Michael Pollan Gets Elemental In 'Cooked'

Penguin Press

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 3:56 pm

In his systematic scrutiny of the modern American food chain, Michael Pollan has explored everything from the evolution of edible plants to the industrial agricultural complex. In his newest book, he charts territory closer to home — or rather, at home, in his kitchen.

Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation surveys how the four classical elements — fire, water, air and earth — transform plants and animals into food. Pollan joins NPR's Rachel Martin to discuss the merits of slow home cooking and his adventures in fermentation.

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Theater
3:08 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

L.A. On B'way: Midler, Mengers Take Manhattan

Bette Midler in I'll Eat You Last: A Chat With Sue Mengers. Midler stars as Mengers, a legendary and larger-than-life Hollywood agent whose sharp wit won her both friends and foes in the film industry.
Richard Termine/BBBway

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 3:56 pm

After more than 40 years away, Bette Midler is returning to Broadway. She's playing legendary Hollywood agent Sue Mengers in a riotous solo show titled I'll Eat You Last.

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Sunday Puzzle
3:07 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

You'll Get It Just Right, Junior

NPR Graphic

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 3:56 pm

On-air challenge: Every answer is a familiar two-word phrase or name with the initials "J.R."

Last week's challenge from listener Sandy Weisz: Take a common English word. Write it in capital letters. Move the first letter to the end and rotate it 90 degrees. You'll get a new word that is pronounced exactly the same as the first word. What words are these?

Answer: Won, one; wry, rye

Winner: Ben Austin of Dobbs Ferry, N.Y.

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Author Interviews
3:07 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

For A Student Of Theology, Poetry Reverberates

Nate Klug is a poet, translator and candidate for ordained ministry in the United Church of Christ. He lives in New Haven, Conn., where he studies at Yale Divinity School.
Frank Brown Courtesy Nate Klug

Originally published on Sun April 21, 2013 3:56 pm

April is National Poetry Month, and NPR is celebrating by asking young poets what poetry means to them. This week, Weekend Edition speaks with Nate Klug, whose poems have appeared in Poetry, Threepenny Review and other journals. Klug is also a master of divinity candidate at the Yale Divinity School and a candidate for ordination in the United Church of Christ. "It's nice to go home from a day of thinking about the church to this whole other world of poetry," he says. "But obviously there are some really amazing ways that they intersect."

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The Two-Way
3:07 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

First Residents Allowed To Return To Damaged Homes In West, Texas

Debby Keel holds her grandchild, Kennedy, as Texas Highway Patrol officers record the entry of residents who are allowed to return to their homes near the site of the April 17 fertilizer plant blast in West, Texas.
Frederic J. Brown AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 6:55 pm

In West, Texas, some of the town's citizens whose homes were damaged by Wednesday night's massive fertilizer plant explosion returned to their homes Saturday afternoon, after authorities declared parts of the area safe. But a curfew is in place, and other areas close to the blast remain off-limits.

From West, NPR's Sam Sanders filed this report for our Newscast unit:

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Author Interviews
3:07 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Kay Bailey Hutchison On Other 'Unflinching' Texan Women

George Ranch Historical Park

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 5:50 pm

Sen. Kay Bailey Hutchison knows what it means to be a pioneering female figure in her home state. In 1993, she became the first woman elected to represent Texas in the U.S. Senate.

Now, the former senator has written a book about the women who came before her, Unflinching Courage: Pioneering Women Who Shaped Texas.

In the book, Hutchison profiles several women who broke barriers and made history in the Lone Star State. Many of those women left a life of luxury and "moved to nothing," she tells All Things Considered host Jacki Lyden.

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A Blog Supreme
3:05 pm
Sun April 21, 2013

Tito Puente: 90 Years Of Getting People To Dance

Tito Puente on vibraphone at the Palladium.
Courtesy of the artist

Originally published on Sat April 20, 2013 6:38 pm

The percussionist and bandleader Tito Puente would have celebrated his 90th birthday this weekend on April 20. And the recently released box set Quatro: The Definitive Collection is a great place to start celebrating the once and forever King of Latin Music. It captures the driving sound of big band mambo and cha-cha-cha that launched people onto dance floors for decades.

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