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6:44 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

The Legacy Of Gen. Ridgway And America's War In Korea

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 11:07 am

The ongoing conflict between North Korea and South Korea is the legacy of the Korean War, which can help explain relations between the two countries. In a new book, historian Victor Davis Hanson discusses how the strategies of U.S. Gen. Matthew Ridgway helped to turn around what appeared to be "a lost war."

Hanson, author of The Savior Generals, tells NPR's Neal Conan that although the three-year war "ended right where it began," it did allow for South Korea to flourish as a democracy.

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Author Interviews
6:38 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

Neil Gaiman Turns His Grad Speech Into 'Good Art'

Neil Gaiman is also the author of Coraline, American Gods, Anansi Boys,Stardust and M Is for Magic. He was born in Hampshire, England, and now lives near Minneapolis.
Darryl James Getty Images

Originally published on Thu May 30, 2013 11:00 am

A year ago, writer Neil Gaiman told the graduating class at Philadelphia's University of the Arts that life is sometimes hard — that things will go wrong in love and business and friendship and health, and in all the other ways that life can go wrong. And that the best thing an artist can do at those times is to "make good art."

That commencement speech became a hit on the Web and has now been adapted into a small book, titled, appropriately, Make Good Art.

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All Songs Considered
6:36 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

New Music: Baths, Jim Jarmusch, Sam Phillips, More

Clockwise from upper left: Baths, Daughter, Sam Phillips, The Front Bottoms, SQURL
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 1:32 pm

We kick this week's show off with a lot of noise from filmmaker (and past guest DJ on All Songs Considered) Jim Jarmusch and his gloriously gritty side project called SQÜRL. The band, with Carter Logan and producer/engineer Shane Stoneback, originally formed to score the 2009 Jarmusch film The Limits Of Control. SQÜRL has a new, self-titled EP coming out this month and we've got a preview cut called "Pink Dust."

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Code Switch
6:36 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

Children Of 'Tiger' Style Parenting May Struggle More

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 4:01 pm

Amy Chua launched the phrase "Tiger Mother" into our cultural lexicon in 2011 to describe a harsh, demanding style of parenting Chua identified as being especially common among parents of Chinese ancestry. The term clearly stuck.

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Krulwich Wonders...
6:32 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

What Is It About Bees And Hexagons?

Robert Krulwich NPR

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 12:26 pm

Solved! A bee-buzzing, honey-licking 2,000-year-old mystery that begins here, with this beehive. Look at the honeycomb in the photo and ask yourself: (I know you've been wondering this all your life, but have been too shy to ask out loud ... ) Why is every cell in this honeycomb a hexagon?

Bees, after all, could build honeycombs from rectangles or squares or triangles ...

But for some reason, bees choose hexagons. Always hexagons.

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The Two-Way
6:32 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

Bipartisan House Group Says It's Reached Immigration Deal

Texas Republican Rep. John Carter (right), a member of the bipartisan group, with House Speaker John Boehner in January.
Cliff Owen AP

Originally published on Thu May 16, 2013 6:53 pm

Members of a bipartisan group of House lawmakers say they've overcome disagreements and have reached a tentative deal to overhaul the nation's immigration system.

Eight Democratic and Republican House members left a two-hour closed-door meeting Thursday evening, saying they would be working on drafting the measure, The Associated Press reports.

"We have an agreement in principle. We're now going to work on finishing up the drafting of the bill," said Rep. John Carter, R-Texas, a member of the group.

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The Picture Show
6:31 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

100 Words: Life And Death Of A Japanese Racehorse

Hajime Kimura documents Japan's racehorse industry.
Courtesy of Hajime Kimura

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 11:52 am

Currently, more than 95 percent of Japan's racehorses are born and raised in the southeast of Hokkaido, an island in northern Japan. The region was known for its war horses until the early 1900s. The intensity of competition at the horse races increased to the point that the new motto is "Losers must disappear." Because of this competitive climate, about 90 percent of horses born with any kinds of defects are transformed into cat food, dog food and food for human consumption. Through this project, I hope to bring awareness to the life and use of horses in Japan.

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Field Recordings
6:31 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

Gregory Porter: A Lion In The Subway

Gregory Porter.
NPR

Originally published on Mon July 7, 2014 4:29 pm

Subway entertainers are a mixed bag, but in the arts mecca of New York City, they're often overqualified — so much so that bands and other musical acts need to audition to even set up underground. And those are just the "official" performers.

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Book Reviews
6:30 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

Black In America: A Story Rendered In Gray Scale

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is also the author of Purple Hibiscus and Half of a Yellow Sun.
Beowulf Sheehan Random House

Originally published on Mon May 20, 2013 8:00 pm

American literature has plenty of coming-of-age novels. What we need more of, judging by the strengths of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's new book, are novels about coming to America. In particular, books that address our biggest problems — in this case, race. Because things natives don't see about themselves often stand out like neon to foreign eyes. And if you think racism expired when President Obama was elected, this is perhaps not — or absolutely is — the book for you.

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The Salt
6:30 pm
Thu May 16, 2013

Why Humans Took Up Farming: They Like To Own Stuff

Prehistoric "pantries": This illustration is based on archaeological findings in Jordan of structures built to store extra grain some 11,000-12,000 years ago.
Illustration by E. Carlson Courtesy of Dr. Ian Kuijt/University of Notre Dame

Originally published on Tue May 14, 2013 10:06 am

For decades, scientists have believed our ancestors took up farming some 12,000 years ago because it was a more efficient way of getting food. But a growing body of research suggests that wasn't the case at all.

"We know that the first farmers were shorter, they were more prone to disease than the hunter-gatherers," says Samuel Bowles, the director of the Behavioral Sciences Program at the Santa Fe Institute in New Mexico, describing recent archaeological research.

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