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Planet Money
6:54 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

In A Single ATM, The Story Of A Nation's Economy

A bank in Yangon recently opened the first ATM in Myanmar that's connected to the rest of the world.
Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 3:35 pm

Nan Htwe Nye works at an elementary school in Yangon, Myanmar. She started trying to use ATM machines a few months ago, and things haven't been going so well.

The machines are often broken, she says. "But," she adds, "we hope it will better in the future." This is, more or less, the story of ATMs — and of banking in general — in Myanmar.

She's visiting the headquarters of CB Bank, at the first ATM in the country that was connected to banks all around the world.

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Planet Money
6:54 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

When A Country Doesn't Trust Its Banks (In 4 Gifs)

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 4:19 pm

Swe Win, who works as a translator and journalist in Myanmar, keeps most of his money — roughly $1,800 in Singaporean and U.S. Dollars — in a diary. He carries it in his backpack wherever he goes.

That's because he doesn't trust Myanmar's banking system. He'd rather keep his cash with him at all times than to put it into a bank account here. (He does have a bank account in Singapore).

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
6:54 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

The 'Brilliant Blunders' Of Science: Success Through Failure

William Thomson Kelvin (1824 - 1907) who proposed the absolute or Kelvin temperature scale. He also established the second law of thermo-dynamics. He was brilliant. But he wasn't perfect.
W. & D. Downey Getty Images

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 3:03 pm

"Experience is the name everyone gives their mistakes" said Oscar Wilde and it is true that, hopefully, we all learn from our mistakes. But what about science?

In school we learn about the scientific method and its emphasis on observation, hypothesis and experiments. Clearly mistakes are an important part of the process. It has even been said that the point of science is to make as many mistakes as possible as fast as possible. Still, what about the really big mistakes?

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Deceptive Cadence
6:54 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

Colors Swirl In A Real Rite Of Spring

Filmmaker Prashant Bhargava and jazz musician Vijay Iyer's project Radhe Radhe: a visually and sonically dazzling collaboration.
KPO Photo courtesy of Carolina Performing Arts

Originally published on Thu January 16, 2014 1:26 pm

One of the most brilliant and exciting commemorations of the 100th anniversary of Igor Stravinsky's Rite of Spring is a new work that references the Russian composer's music — but in an entirely new cultural framework. It's a pairing of film and music called Radhe, Radhe: Rites of Holi.

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Monkey See
6:53 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

A Parade Of Goobers: 17 Actual People Presented To 'The Bachelorette'

Desiree's parade of goobers. You'll notice the one without the shirt on. And the fact that many of them are the same guy.
Kevin Foley ABC

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 12:49 pm

Last night brought the premiere of the new season of The Bachelorette, in which Desiree, who was rejected by Sean on the last season of The Bachelor, was presented with 25 men from whom to choose. The theory is that if television producers choose 25 guys for you to pick from, surely one of them is your soul mate. Makes sense!

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Krulwich Wonders...
6:52 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

Not Winging It, But Ringing It

YouTube

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 11:04 am

Humans do it with smoke.

Dolphins do it with air.

With a little snort, dolphins can produce a nearly perfect "air" rings, (sophisticated non-dolphins called them toroidal vortices) which they turn into underwater toys.

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All Songs Considered
6:51 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

New Music: Boards Of Canada, A Sharon Van Etten-Shearwater Duet, Thundercat, More

Clockwise from upper left: Sharon Van Etten, Boards Of Canada, Thundercat, Natasha Kmeto
Courtesy of the artists

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 9:26 pm

Last month the Scottish electronic duo Boards Of Canada released a series of mysterious recordings of a voice reading a set of numbers. Clever fans soon realized that the numbers were a code that, once entered, in order, online, revealed a video announcing Tomorrow's Harvest, the group's first new album in eight years. On this week's All Songs Considered we finally get a preview of the album with a brand new Boards Of Canada song "Reach For The Dead."

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Monkey See
6:51 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

Bad News, Men: You're Not Very Charming

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 10:09 am

I hate to break this to you, Men Of The Entire United States (Especially Actors), but The Atlantic has just run a lengthy piece pronouncing you un-charming.

At first, Benjamin Schwarz seems to mean "good conversationalist" when he says "charming." He says:

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The Picture Show
6:50 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

Dashing Through The Snow ... With A Reindeer In A Pickup Truck?

"Velvet Eyes" — a pet reindeer belonging to Carl Emmons — stands in the back of a pickup truck outside a market and gas station in Nome, Alaska.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Wed May 29, 2013 8:45 am

As a photographer working for NPR, I travel the globe covering assignments with our reporters and correspondents. The logistics of getting into a place can be brutal, and rarely do photographs "just happen" without a tremendous amount of time and effort.

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Book Reviews
6:50 pm
Thu May 30, 2013

Sons, Guns And The Sins Of The Father In Meyer's Texas Epic

Cover of The Son

Originally published on Tue May 28, 2013 9:17 am

"Texas yesterday is unbelievable, but no more incredible than Texas today," wrote Edna Ferber, author of the iconic Lone Star State novel Giant. She continues, in what's as good a description of America's 28th state as you're likely to encounter, "Today's Texas is exhilarating, exasperating, violent, charming, horrible, delightful, alive." A huge contradiction of a place, Texas is as friendly as it can be frightening, with a history as vast and as variegated as the United States itself.

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