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11:50 am
Fri June 7, 2013

For A Girl And Her Horses, A Bumpy Ride To Adulthood

iStockphoto.com

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 5:03 am

Anton DiSclafani's debut novel, The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls, is a painstakingly constructed ode to a young girl's sexual awakening — just ladylike enough to be more bodice unbuttoner than bodice ripper. Like Rumer Godden's classic 1958 novel, The Greengage Summer, this is perhaps one of the classier books a young teen would hide under her covers to read with a flashlight. It features a 15-year-old narrator, Theodora "Thea" Atwell, whose family banishes her to a North Carolina equestrian boarding school in 1930. There's been a scandal.

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Business
11:50 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Pizza-Delivering Drones? Domino's Gives It A Shot

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 9:58 am

Domino's Pizza has developed a prototype for aerial pizza delivery. A promotional video follows a custom-built, remote-controlled helicopter as it soars above the countryside carrying two large pizzas. But aviation rules make it unlikely that drone delivery will arrive anytime soon.

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Planet Money
11:47 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Planet Money: How To Get A Country To Trust Its Banks

Lam Thuy Vo / NPR

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:23 pm

It's something you can see on every block in most major cities. You probably see it every day and never give a second thought to. But in Yangon, Myanmar, an ATM is a small miracle.

For decades, Myanmar was cut off from the rest of the world. There were international sanctions, and no one in the U.S. or Europe did business there.

But last year, when the international sanctions started to be lifted, companies like Visa and Mastercard were excited to come in. The country has about 50 million people — that's a lot of potential customers to pay ATM fees.

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The Salt
11:47 am
Fri June 7, 2013

On National Doughnut Day, Free Food And Feel-Good History

The cover of the Salvation Army's War Cry magazine from 1918 commemorates the "Doughnut Girl."
Wikimedia Commons

Originally published on Tue June 11, 2013 9:43 am

We here at The Salt tend to look at themed food holidays with a heavy dose of skepticism. Most of these days sound more like marketing schemes than true reasons for a national day of remembrance.

So we were pleasantly surprised to learn that there is a bona fide historical reason to chow down on a deep-fried pastry today to mark National Doughnut Day.

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The Two-Way
11:45 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Friday's El Reno Tornado Called Widest In U.S. History

Data released Tuesday shows that the deadly El Reno tornado that struck Friday was the widest every recorded in the U.S., at 2.6 miles.
National Weather Service

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 8:04 pm

The tornado that struck El Reno, Okla., Friday "is officially the widest known tornado in the U.S.," says the National Weather Service office in Norman, Okla., announcing today that at its widest, the storm stretched across 2.6 miles.

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The Two-Way
11:44 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'Night Stalker' Richard Ramirez Dies In Prison

Originally published on Fri June 7, 2013 12:38 pm

Richard Ramirez, the serial killer known as the Night Stalker, has died of natural causes in California, the AP reports, citing corrections officials.

KRON-TV reports that Ramirez was on death row in California's San Quentin prison. The station adds:

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The Two-Way
11:44 am
Fri June 7, 2013

'Nobody Is Listening To Your Telephone Calls,' Obama Says

President Obama on Thursday in Mooresville, N.C.
Davis Turner EPA /LANDOV

In his most extensive comments so far on the revelations this week about the electronic data that the nation's spy agencies are collecting, President Obama told the American people Friday that "nobody is listening to your telephone calls."

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Kitchen Window
11:42 am
Fri June 7, 2013

We All Scream For Ice Cream

Michele Kayal for NPR

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 2:19 pm

My husband's cousin, Milind, stops the car alongside Mumbai's famous Chowpatty Beach, and I think it's because we're going to take in the scene: the cavorting clowns, the camels, the balloon sellers, the people thronging the sand as though it's noon instead of midnight. I begin walking toward the beach, but Milind pulls me in the other direction. Toward the New Kulfi Center.

"Milind, please," I moan. The ice cream stand is just the latest stop on an hours-long eating odyssey that took us from street food to a juice shop to grilled cheese.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
11:41 am
Fri June 7, 2013

Putting The Fun Back Into Fundamental Science

The line stretches down the block ahead of an event during the 2012 Seattle Science Festival. The 2013 festival runs from June 6 through June 16.
Courtesy of Pacific Science Center

Originally published on Tue June 4, 2013 2:31 pm

America has a problem. It's an existential problem, a big one that threatens our collective future. Our problem is the failing bond between science and the American people. Luckily for us all, it's a problem that can be solved. The solution? A big party! Well, that's not the solution, but celebrating science is one way to renew our community's bond with society.

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Planet Money
11:38 am
Fri June 7, 2013

President Obama Wants To Tackle The Patent Problem

The red part of the bars shows patent lawsuits brought by patent assertion Entities (PAEs, also known as "patent trolls").
Colleen Chien Patent Assertion And U.S. Innovation

Originally published on Wed June 5, 2013 1:42 am

On this week's This American Life, we took a close look at a patent lawsuit involving the online backup company Carbonite. Carbonite was sued for patent infringement by a shell company called Oasis Research. According to Carbonite, Oasis was seeking $20 million in damages.

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