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All Tech Considered
1:45 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Arrest Caught On Google Glass Reignites Privacy Debate

Filmmaker Chris Barrett wearing his Google Glass. He is among the first 1,000 nondeveloper testers of the product.
Jennifer Rubinovitz Courtesy of Chris Barrett

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:36 am

The Fourth of July holiday brought about another first for Google Glass, the computing device that you can wear on your face.

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The Two-Way
1:29 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Gov. Rick Perry Says He Won't Seek Re-Election In Texas

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 6:01 pm

Texas Gov. Rick Perry says he will not run for re-election in 2014, feeding speculation that he might again pursue the presidency as a Republican candidate in the 2016 race.

The governor made his announcement at a news conference Monday in San Antonio, which was carried live online by The Texas Tribune.

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NPR Story
1:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

A Pilot's Perspective On San Francisco Crash

A fire truck sprays water on Asiana Flight 214 after it crashed at San Francisco International Airport on Saturday, July 6, 2013, in San Francisco. (Noah Berger/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 11:15 am

Investigators are trying to determine whether pilot error was to blame in the deadly crash at San Francisco’s airport over the weekend.

The crash killed two people and sent more than 180 to hospitals.

Asiana Airlines has said that Lee Gang-guk, who was at the controls, had nearly 10,000 hours flying other planes but only 43 hours flying the Boeing 777. It was his first time landing that type of plane at that airport.

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NPR Story
1:27 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Crash Investigators: Did Jet Stall And Hit Sea Wall?

This aerial photo shows the wreckage of the Asiana Flight 214 airplane after it crashed at the San Francisco International Airport in San Francisco, Saturday, July 6, 2013. (Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP)

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 4:21 pm

Investigators say the Asiana Airlines jet that crashed at the San Francisco International Airport on Saturday, killing two passengers and sending more than 180 to hospitals, may have been on the verge of stalling because it was flying too slowly.

The plane clipped the sea wall as it came in for a landing, crashing onto the runway and breaking apart.

The airline said today that the pilot of the plane was experienced but was landing a Boeing 777 for the first time at San Francisco airport.

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The Two-Way
1:20 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Snowden: Americans Are Good; But Their Leaders Lie

Edward Snowden, seen during a video interview with The Guardian.
Glenn Greenwald/Laura Poitras EPA /LANDOV

When he went to work for the nation's spy agencies, "I believed in the goodness of what we were doing" and in the "nobility of our intentions to free oppressed people overseas," says the so-called NSA leaker, Edward Snowden, in a month-old video posted online Monday by The Guardian.

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Parallels
12:59 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Reversing Direction, Some Syrian Refugees Now Head Home

Refugees at the Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan try to squeeze on one of the buses heading back to Syria. Syrian refugees have been coming to Jordan for two years, but some are now starting to head home.
Peter Breslow NPR

Originally published on Tue July 9, 2013 11:36 am

In the Jordanian desert, the chaos begins at sundown, when the wind whips up the desert sand and the buses arrive. For the past two years, Syrian refugees have been streaming into Jordan, and they now number an estimated half million.

But for the past month, more refugees have returned to Syria than entered Jordan, and hundreds are leaving daily from Zaatari, the U.N.'s largest refugee camp in Jordan.

"Four buses are going every day," says Kilian Kleinschmidt, who runs Zaatari. "Depending on how many people manage to storm the buses, it's probably 300 to 400 people."

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The Two-Way
12:53 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

A 'Mea Culpa'

Nina Totenberg
Steve Barrett NPR

I have always believed in correcting mistakes, especially bad ones. In my wrap-up piece at the end of the Supreme Court term, I quoted Northwestern University law professor John McGinnis as one of several conservative scholars highly critical of the court's decision on the Voting Rights Act.

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NPR Story
12:47 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

How To Garden In Drought And Heat

A volunteer at the USDA People's Garden tends to garlic. (Lance Cheung/USDA)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:27 pm

With much of the country under drought conditions and temperatures soaring in the rest of the country, what is a backyard gardener to do?

Ahmed Hassan is a professional landscaper and former host of Turf Wars and Yard Crashers on the DIY network and HGTV. Hassan told Here & Now that the most important things to think about when prepping your garden for drought are the type of plants you use and how you treat your soil.

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NPR Story
12:46 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Buddhist Monk Confronts Japan's Suicide Culture

Alarmed by a rise in people jumping to their deaths in front of trains, Japanese railway operators are installing special blue lights above station platforms they hope will have a soothing effect and reduce suicides, Oct. 14, 2009. (Itsuo Inouye/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:27 pm

Japan’s suicide rate is twice that of the United States. More than 30,000 people a year kill themselves in Japan.

So many people jump in front of subway trains that when a train stops between stations, people just assume it’s a suicide.

A Buddhist monk, Ittetsu Nemoto, decided he wanted to do something about that. He now works with depressed Japanese people who make the journey to his temple.

Larissa MacFarquhar, a staff writer for The New Yorker, wrote about Nemoto in a recent issue.

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NPR Story
12:46 pm
Mon July 8, 2013

Fears Of Civil War In Egypt After 'Massacre'

An Egyptian man cries outside a morgue after carrying the corpse of his brother killed near the Republican Guard building in Cairo, Egypt, Monday, July 8, 2013. (Manu Brabo/AP)

Originally published on Mon July 8, 2013 2:27 pm

The only Islamist group to join the military in deposing the elected government of Mohammed Morsi says it will withdraw its support for the transition plan in response to what it calls a “massacre” of pro-Morsi supporters.

Egypt’s state news agency says at least 51 civilians are dead and over 400 injured after the Egyptian army opened fire on hundreds of Islamists who had been holding a sit-in outside the offices of the Republican Guard in Cairo.

The protesters were demanding that the army reinstate Mohammed Morsi to the presidency.

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