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Barbershop
10:46 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Maj. Nidal Hasan: A Murderer or Martyr ?

Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

I'm Michel Martin, and this is TELL ME MORE from NPR News. Later in the program today, we'll talk about immigration, but not in the way you might expect. Most often, we seem to hear about immigrants who are desperate to stay in the U.S. Later, we'll hear from a woman who said life was not what she'd hoped for here, so she packed up and went back to Trinidad. We'll hear from her in just a few minutes. But we are going to start the program today with a visit to the Barbershop.

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The Salt
10:31 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Why Picking Your Berries For $8,000 A Year Hurts A Lot

A Triqui Mexican picks strawberries at a farm in Washington state.
Courtesy of Seth Holmes

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 9:55 am

As the supply chain that delivers our food to us gets longer and more complicated, many consumers want to understand — and control — where their food comes from.

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WRKF
10:19 am
Fri August 9, 2013

MONDAY: LA Lottery President Rose Hudson, Film Director Cleve Bailey

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 9:36 am

Jim visits with Louisiana Lottery President Rose Hudson about frequent winners, recent changes to popular games and making millionaires in Louisiana.

Cleve Bailey talks with Jim about the Louisiana Film Industry and the new documentary he is working on about Trayvon Martin.


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Music News
10:02 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Remembering The People's Throat Singer Of Tuva

Kongar-Ol Ondar at the 72nd Annual Academy Awards in Los Angeles. Genghis Blues was nominated for an Oscar for Best Documentary Short.
Scott Nelson Getty Images.

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 10:57 am

The technique known as throat singing is an ancient style still practiced in Tuva, a small republic between Siberia and Mongolia's Gobi desert. Traditionally, it was practiced by herders.

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The Two-Way
9:32 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Father And Son Coaxed From Jungle 40 Years After Vietnam War

Ho Van Lang, found in the jungle of central Vietnam 40 years after he and his father fled the war.
VTV2

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 12:55 pm

Four decades ago, Ho Van Thanh fled the fighting in his native Vietnam, disappearing into the jungle with his infant son, Ho Van Lang. This week, father and son emerged for the first time — an enfeebled Thanh carried in a stretcher, and Lang wearing only a loincloth made of tree bark.

According to the Vietnamese newspaper Dan Tri, Ho Van Thanh, now 82, was last seen in 1973 running into the jungle, after his wife and two other children were killed by a bomb or land mine near his home.

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Business
9:28 am
Fri August 9, 2013

UBS To Pay $120 Million In Lehman Brothers Dispute

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:06 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

NPR's business news starts with more fallout from the financial crisis.

Swiss banking giant UBS has agreed to pay $120 million to settle a lawsuit by investors. The case goes back to 2007. Investors say they were misled about the health of the financial firm Lehmann Brothers when UBS was selling them investments linked to Lehmann's debt. Lehmann collapsed into bankruptcy in September 2008. The settlement resolves claims of about $1 billion. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.

The Two-Way
9:23 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Moving On, And Up: Brian Banks, 27, Plays As NFL Rookie

Atlanta Falcons linebacker Brian Banks made his NFL debut in a preseason game Thursday night, more than 10 years after he was sent to prison for a crime of which he was later exonerated.
John Bazemore AP

"You're up next."

Those three words are what any athlete longs to hear. For linebacker Brian Banks, it took more than 10 years for that sentence to be addressed to him by an NFL coach. When he heard it in a preseason game Thursday night, Banks got a taste of the life he once dreamed of — before he became a convicted felon and lost his chance to go to college, and was finally exonerated.

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Shots - Health News
9:19 am
Fri August 9, 2013

'Aetna, I'm Glad I Met Ya!' — On Twitter

Evidently, an old insurer can learn new tricks.
Bob Child AP

Originally published on Fri August 9, 2013 11:12 am

A few weeks back, Sharon Roberts, who had been diagnosed with endometrial cancer last year, tweeted:

@teachdance11: the BRCA gene test is 2 parts. Aetna paid $300 part. Not the $7000 part. Gotta be rich to be in the know

The 55-year-old teacher in Houston was surprised when @aetnahelp, a Twitter account created for customer assistance by the insurance company Aetna, quickly responded.

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The Two-Way
9:10 am
Fri August 9, 2013

I Just Killed My Wife, Miami Man's Facebook Page Says

Derek Medina in a booking photo taken by the Miami-Dade Police Department.
handout Reuters /Landov

"I'm going to prison or death sentence for killing my wife. Love you guys. Miss you guys. Take care. Facebook people you'll see me in the news."

The Miami Herald and other news outlets are reporting that 31-year-old Derek Medina of South Miami apparently posted that Facebook message Thursday morning, along with a photo of a woman's "twisted, bloodied body lying on a linoleum floor."

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NPR Story
8:58 am
Fri August 9, 2013

Feist-Weiller Cancer Center in Shreveport seeks aspirin study patients

Feist-Weiller Cancer Center in Shreveport is recruiting patients for a study underway in the United States and Australia that will follow 19,000 people who are 65 and older to look at the risk and benefits of an aspirin-a-day regimen. The placebo-controlled clinical trial will look at whether there are potential benefits for the prevention of heart disease, certain cancers and even dementia. But are the known risks of gastrointestinal bleeding and stroke too great? Dr. Gary Burton, clinical research director at Feist-Weiller, said it’s time to find out.

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