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The Two-Way
12:47 pm
Sun August 18, 2013

Koreas Set Talks To Resume Cross-Border Family Reunions

South Korean Kim Jung-Man, right, bids farewell to his North Korean relative before they return to their respective homes on opposite sides of the border in November 2010.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 3:14 pm

North Korea has agreed to talks with the South to resume cross-border reunions of families separated for decades by the most militarized border in the world.

On Sunday, a spokesman for the Pyongyang's Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of Korea, said it had agreed to talks, hosted by the Red Cross, that are to take place on Sept. 19 at North Korea's Diamond Mountain resort.

In the past, temporary thaws in bilateral relations have allowed some families separated by the 1950-53 Korean War to meet briefly at the border.

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The Two-Way
10:08 am
Sun August 18, 2013

China's Disgraced Politician Bo Xilai Goes On Trial This Week

Bo Xilai at the opening of the National People's Congress at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing March 2012, six months before his expulsion.
Feng Li Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 3:22 pm

China's Bo Xilai, the one-time Communist Party chief of Chongqing who is accused of bribery, corruption and abuse of power, will go on trial this week in the culmination of a case that has highlighted wrongdoing in the top rungs of the country's political ranks.

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The Two-Way
8:42 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Scotland Yard 'Assessing' New Information In Diana Death

A photo taken in the Alma Tunnel in Paris on the night of Aug. 31, 1997, shows the smashed Mercedes in which Princess Diana and her companion Dodi Al Fayed were passengers.
Handout Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 3:33 pm

Scotland Yard says it is "assessing [the] relevance and credibility" of new information relating to the 1997 death of Princess Diana and her boyfriend Dodi Al Fayed in a Paris car crash.

The Metropolitan Police would not say what the information entailed or where it came from, but that it was "not a re-investigation" of the case.

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The Two-Way
7:34 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Philippine Navy Still Hopes For Survivors From Ferry Crash

A relative of one of the missing passengers writes down contact numbers on Sunday at the office of the ferry involved in a collision, in Cebu City.
Ted Aljibe AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 4:15 pm

Divers in the Philippines are making scant progress in their efforts to recover survivors — or bodies — from the scene where a ferry sank after colliding with a cargo ship near the central port city of Cebu.

About 35 people have been confirmed dead from MV Thomas Aquinas, which was carrying more than 800 passengers when it was struck late Friday and then sank within minutes.

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The Two-Way
7:07 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Egypt Tense After Bloody Crackdown On Protests

Mourners attend the funeral of Ammar Badie, son of the Muslim Brotherhood's Supreme Guide, at the Katameya cemetery in the New Cairo district on Sunday. Badie was killed in clashes with security forces.
Ed Giles Getty Images

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 12:51 am

This post was updated 1:00 a.m. ET Monday

The Egyptian government says at least 36 people were killed Sunday — Islamists who had been in custody of security forces, according to a report in The New York Times.

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Middle East
5:41 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Cairo Mosque Is A Protest Flashpoint

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 3:07 pm

Transcript

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Rachel Martin. At least 800 people have been killed in Egypt since the ouster of President Mohamed Morsi last month and the subsequent protests launched by his supporters. Yesterday, a Cairo mosque was the scene of a struggle between police and soldiers and Morsi supporters who had taken shelter there.

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Middle East
4:29 am
Sun August 18, 2013

Obama Struggles To Find Effective Egypt Policy

President Obama delivers a statement on Egypt at his vacation home on Martha's Vineyard on Thursday.
Pool Getty Images

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:00 pm

The Obama administration is in a difficult situation with its Egypt policy.

President Obama, who often talks about free speech and human rights, has cancelled joint military exercises with Egypt but has stopped short of cutting off aid to the Egyptian military. As the violence continues in the streets of Cairo and other Egyptian cities, all sides seem unhappy with the U.S. approach.

In 2009, on his first trip to the Middle East as president, in the same year he won the Nobel Peace Prize, Obama spoke of a new approach to relations with the Islamic world.

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Parallels
4:29 am
Sun August 18, 2013

What's Next For Egypt: 3 Scenarios

Supporters of the deposed Egyptian president, Mohammed Morsi, carry an injured demonstrator who was shot during clashes in Ramses Square in Cairo on Friday. Dozens were killed nationwide in escalating violence.
AMR ABDALLAH DALSH Reuters /Landov

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 11:27 am

For two years, the conversation on Egypt centered on how to build a democracy. Suddenly the discussion has turned much darker, with some wondering aloud whether the largest Arab nation is hurtling toward civil war.

The bloody crackdown by Egypt's security forces has raised the specter of a protracted conflict pitting the military against the Muslim Brotherhood, the country's most powerful political force.

Egypt's escalating crisis is far too volatile for any declarative statements, analysts say. But here are three possible scenarios that could play out:

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Books
8:17 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Martinis And Manuscripts: Publishing In The Good Old Days

Boris Kachka has written for The New York Times, Conde Nast Traveler, GQ and Elle.
Mia Tran

Originally published on Mon August 19, 2013 8:06 am

Elissa Schappell is the author of Blueprints for Building Better Girls.

In the good old, bad old days of book publishing, screaming matches happened in public, not online; the boss' philandering was an open secret never leaked to the press, and authors actually had to turn in their manuscripts in order to get money out of their publisher.

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Author Interviews
8:17 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

'Good Lord Bird' Gives Abolitionist Heroes Novel Treatment

Originally published on Sun August 18, 2013 6:35 am

Before abolitionist and Harpers Ferry raider John Brown became a hymn, he was a flesh and blood human being: Bible-thumping, rifle-toting, heroic and maybe more than a little unhinged.

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