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NPR Story
7:30 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

To Change Your Search Results, It Will Cost You

(Jens Meyer/AP)

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 3:40 pm

As people become more concerned about the information available about them on the Internet and how it is used, they turn to different approaches to protect their online presence.

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NPR Story
7:30 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

U.S. Files Lawsuit To Block Airline Merger

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 3:40 pm

The Justice Department and a number of U.S. state attorneys general are challenging the proposed $11 billion merger between US Airways Group Inc. and American Airlines’ parent company, AMR Corp.

The Justice Department says the merger would result in the creation of the world’s largest airline. The government says a combination of the two companies would reduce competition for commercial air travel in local markets and would result in passengers paying higher airfares and receive less service.

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NPR Story
7:30 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

New Chapter In Bizarre Detroit Murder Case

An undated photo of Davontae Sanford. (Michigan Department of Corrections via AP)

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 3:40 pm

A new chapter in a bizarre murder case is playing out in Detroit.

Four people were gunned down in a suspected drug house in 2007. A 14-year-old, partially blind, learning-disabled boy named Davontae Sanford confessed.

But a month later, a convicted hit man told police he was the real murderer.

Now, after five years in prison, Sanford may get another shot at justice.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Kate Wells of Michigan Radio reports.

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NPR Story
7:30 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Texas Border Sheriff Blasts New Federal Drug Policy

A U.S. Border Patrol sits at the end of the border fence at Fort Hancock in Hudspeth County, Texas, Friday, March 26, 2010. (LM Otero/AP)

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 3:40 pm

Arvin West, the sheriff of Hudspeth County, Texas, is blasting U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder for declaring yesterday that federal prosecutors would no longer pursue harsh mandatory minimum prison sentences for low-level, non-violent drug offenders.

He says federal border patrol agents in his border county are arresting but not prosecuting more and more minor drug offenders and he’s left with having to house them in the county jail — sometimes for months.

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NPR Story
7:29 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Another Obamacare Delay: Limit On Consumer Costs

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 3:40 pm

The Obama administration has delayed a provision in the Affordable Care Act.

The limit on out-of-pocket costs for consumers will now be delayed until 2015, in a setback to the president’s health care law.

The Obama administration announced the delay earlier this year on a Department of Labor website, but it went largely unnoticed until now.

Kaiser Health News reported on the delay back in April.

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NPR Story
7:29 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

N.C. Gov. Pat McCrory Defends New Voter ID Law

Pat McCrory is pictured in July 2012, during his campaign for governor of North Carolina. (Hal Goodtree/Flickr)

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 3:40 pm

The American Civil Liberties Union says it’s going to take legal action to stop the country’s newest — and one of its most restrictive — voter ID laws, signed into law yesterday by Republican Governor Pat McCrory of North Carolina.

The new law requires voters to show government-issued photo ID cards, and outlaws college ID cards or out-of-state driver’s licenses as valid forms of identification.

The law also eliminates same-day voter registration, and allows any registered voter to challenge another’s eligibility.

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13.7: Cosmos And Culture
7:29 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

The Power Of Science And The Danger Of Scientism

No matter what face you put on it, science is a powerful tool. Here, engineer Marcus Hold works on a nearly completed RoboThespian. Marvels of modern science, these fully interactive and multilingual humanoid robots are increasingly being sold to academic research groups.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 12:29 pm

Can you be a strident defender of science and still be suspicious of the way it is appropriated within culture? Can you be passionate about the practice and promise of science, yet still remain troubled by the way other beliefs and assumptions are heralded in its name? If such a thing is possible, you may be pro-science but anti-scientism. And, if that is the case, then Steven Pinker may have just pissed you off. But, as we'll see, it might be hard to tell.

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The Protojournalist
7:28 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Culture War Cookbook: Drinks For Two

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 10:15 am

The divide between creationists and evolutionists is wide and woolly. But surely there is something the two sides could agree on.

Perhaps they could agree on two sides. Or two entrees. Or two drinks, for that matter.

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Monkey See
7:28 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

On 'Doomsday Castle,' If Armageddon Doesn't Get You, Your Tractor Might

Brent, Jr. in his battering ram, on National Geographic Channel's Doomsday Castle.
National Geographic Channel

Originally published on Tue August 13, 2013 7:55 am

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Code Switch
7:28 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Kiese Laymon's Overdue Success Proves Publishers Can Change

Kiese Laymon is a contributing editor at Gawker and has written for NPR.org.
Courtesy of Kiese Laymon

Originally published on Thu August 15, 2013 6:59 am

Writer Kiese Laymon has had the kind of year every first-time author dreams of: two books published to critical acclaim. But none of that came easily. The title of his most recent book, an essay collection released on Tuesday, hints at how tough the road really was: It's called How to Slowly Kill Yourself and Others in America.

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