News

Gus Bennett Jr.

This week on All Things New Orleans we had a chat with NPR's Tiny Desk Contest winner, Tank and The Bangas. The New Orleans band is known for their culmination of R&B and Funk with Rock, atop the vocals and poetic power of lead singer, Tarriona "Tank" Ball.  

Here at WWNO, we don't have a "Tiny Desk" but our studio is equipped with a digital piano. Before recording the interview, Tank and keyboard Banga, Merell Burkett played around for a minute and here's what it sounds like. 

National Digital Library of the United States Fish and Wildlife Service

In coming days, President Donald Trump is set to make an executive order to reverse much of President Obama’s climate change policy. The details are still unclear. But here in Louisiana, state officials and environmentalists are already grappling with the new administration’s actions on the environment – like proposed cuts to the Environmental Protection Agency.

WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with Steve Cochran, of the Environmental Defense Fund, about the implications for the state.

Johnny Allan
American Routes

Each Week, American Routes bring you Shortcuts, a sneak peak at our upcoming show. Johnnie Allan is a Swamp Pop legend, born John Allen Guillot, a sharecropper’s son. His mother and grandfather were musicians who played with family member Joe Falcon, on the first Cajun record in 1928. At 13, Johnnie Allan formed a Cajun Band. Later, he joined accordionist Lawrence Walker’s band on steel guitar.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

As extreme weather brings more natural disasters, like flooding and wildfires, more Americans are experiencing them in their own backyard or seeing them play out on TV. As a result, preparing for disasters might be more mainstream than in the past. National Geographic’s Doomsday Preppers show is hugely popular. Families used to build bomb shelters; now people are packing emergency bags for the next big weather event. It’s become big business.

The fried seafood boat at Morton's Seafood in Madisonville.
Ian McNulty

The seafood boat is not a po-boy, and it’s different from a seafood platter. It belongs to its own niche. It flies brazenly in the face of modern low-carb diets, but survives at a handful of eateries. It can kindle cravings in those with a nostalgic bent, and maybe event those who enjoy a little spectacle with their supper.

This week on All Things New Orleans, we share an alternative solution to imprisonment through a program called Delgado Forward. Dr. Arnel Cosey, Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs & Executive Dean of Delgado (City Park campus) and Judge Arthur Hunter, Orleans Parish Criminal District Court-Section K, talk about the intervention program for non-violent offenders. 

Then, reporter Molly Peterson checks in with former FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate.

And NPR Tiny Desk Contest Winner, Tank and the Bangas stop by to talk about their victory performance and more! 

Abita Springs is going green.

This week on Inside the Arts,  Second Star New Orleans presents Two for Tennessee, two original one act plays by New Orleans writers inspired by the legacy of Tennessee Williams.  We talk with artistic director Harold Gervais.

Three-Steppin' at Bayou Movimiento

Mar 23, 2017
Bayou Movimiento

If there is one thing we can say for certain that New Orleanians love to do, it is move their hips. Dancer, choreographer, and teacher Sergio Zelaya is teaching them how to do just that. He is the organizer and instructor of Bayou Movimiento and holds dance socials around the city. Sergio joined NolaVie’s Kelley Crawford in the studio to talk about all things salsa.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford.  

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

There was a lot of talk of what it would cost to make people WHOLE again after last summer’s devastating floods. And while bureaucrats have searched for a way to quantify a complete recovery for Louisiana residents, Jesse Hardman reports on how many flood affected families are simply going about finding their own ways forward.

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