News

Bao, or Chinese steamed buns, anchor the menu of traditional dishes at Bao & Noodle in New Orleans.
Ian McNulty

The meal started with a sticky cluster of peanuts spiked with chiles that temporarily numbed the tongue. There was a salad that had the crunch of fresh-cut slaw and brought a bona fide caffeinated buzz from bits of fermented tea leaves strewn throughout.

Conversation with New Orleans based filmmaker John Richie.   His latest documentary "91%" looks at gun violence in this country.

91%: A Film About Guns In America, screens tonight [7/21] at Tulane University in the Boggs, Lavin-Bernick Center at 7pm.  A panel discussion follows. 

Lenny Alsfeld on this week's Out to Lunch with Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

If you were born in 2004 and you’re now in 8th grade, you’ve never known a time when New Orleans wasn’t Hollywood South. Hold on to those memories. By the time you get to college nobody will believe you’d see Tom Cruise at the football game or Matthew McConaughey in the park.

If things keep going the way they are, the dismantling of the state’s film tax credits will make Hollywood South a golden era that’s never coming back. Or is it?

You are about to enter another dimension. Not just one of sight and sound, but of mind. It is a dimension of costumed revelry and sugared cakes with plastic babies, of fanatics dressed in black and gold and sandwiches dressed with “mynez” and Crystal. A dimension of wild celebration of the human condition, a place where everyone is “dawlin” and no one is without a cold drink. 

There is a signpost up ahead. You are about to enter...The New Orleans Zone.

A makeshift memorial at the commercial plaza where three Baton Rouge law enforcement officers were killed.
Ryan Kailath / WWNO

Louisiana Governor John Bel Edwards and state law enforcement officials revealed more details about the events that led to the shooting deaths of three local law enforcement officers in Baton Rouge.

 


Now that Marlene Kennedy finally has her own apartment, she doesn't have to worry where she'll sleep each night.
Cheryl Gerber / Unprisoned

Louisiana is the incarceration capital of the world. But most people behind bars aren’t locked up forever. In fact, 90 percent of them will someday be released. So that makes Louisiana also the reentry capital of the world-- a role the state is ill-prepared for.

Poppy Tooker and Kate Gerwin
Joe Shriner

It's that magical time of year in New Orleans when cocktailians and spirits experts from around the world come together in the blazing heat for the world's pre-eminent cocktail festival, Tales of the Cocktail. On this week's show, we're giving you an insider's view into the Crescent City’s most spirited gathering. 

Photo Credit: Xun Wang

This week on Inside the Arts, the NOLA Project's latest theater experience takes audiences to a movie set, atop a downtown hotel.

Then, the New Orleans International Piano Competition presented by MASNO opens this week with a performance by a former gold medalist.  We talk with pianist Marianna Prjevalskaya.

And, we round out with a magical tale as the New Orleans Shakespeare Festival at Tulane closes its season with Tony Kushner’s The Illusion.

Airs Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. and Thursdays at 8:45 a.m.

This week on The Reading Life:  Rising star of Mexican fiction and New Orleanian Yuri Herrera, whose new novel is Transmigration of Bodies, and Kerry Hamilton, who’s the ambassador his great grandmother’s book, Trials of the Earth The True Story of a Pioneer Woman by Mary Mann Hamilton.  And Susan reviews Lionel Shriver’s The Mandibles, 2029-2047.

The investigation into the deadly Baton Rouge police shootings is focusing on what prompted the attacker to open fire. 

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