News

Jesse Hardman / WWNO

There was a lot of talk of what it would cost to make people WHOLE again after last summer’s devastating floods. And while bureaucrats have searched for a way to quantify a complete recovery for Louisiana residents, Jesse Hardman reports on how many flood affected families are simply going about finding their own ways forward.

Wallis Watkins / WWNO/WRKF

Even before the March and August floods hit Louisiana, the state faced a shortage of affordable rental housing. That shortage grew as homes flooded and became uninhabitable. On Tuesday, Governor John Bel Edwards announced an initiative to help fill that need. Wallis Watkins reports.

Along with Housing and Urban Development and the Louisiana Housing Corporation, the state is looking for good neighbors - landlords and property owners willing to dedicate available units to flood survivors.

This week on Inside the Arts, a 40 year veteran of the arts is celebrating a milestone on Royal Street.  We catch up with gallery owner Angela King who is planning a big public exhibit this weekend.

Then...the French Quarter is ground zero as visitors are in town for the 31st annual Tennessee Williams New Orleans Literary Festival.

And, we round out with a festival to test your stamina.  It's Bach-Around-the-Clock time. A 29 hour marathon, Uptown, honors the Baroque composer.

This week on The Reading Life: A great line-up of authors coming for The Tennessee Williams/New Orleans Literary Festival, with NPR favorite Amy Dickinson, whose new book is Strangers Tend to Tell Me Things: A Memoir of Love, Loss, and Coming Home; actress and biographer Patricia Bosworth, whose new memoir is The Men in My Life: A Memoir of Love and Art in 1950s Manhattan; and environmental historian Jack E. Davis, whose new book is The Gulf: The Making of an American Sea, a must-read for folks in our area.

**Lagniappe Audio**

Wallis Watkins / WWNO/WRKF

In September 2016, the Department of Housing and Urban Development awarded East Baton Rouge Parish an $11 million grant to assist with flood recovery. Thursday night, Mayor Sharon West Broome's office proposed a new plan on how to spend it. Wallis Watkins reports.

The money was first granted under former Mayor Kip Holden, who developed a spending plan. But when Mayor Broome took office in January, that plan was changed. Rowdy Gaudet with the Mayor's office says so far, that hasn't meant a delay in receiving the money.

This week on All Things New Orleans, the city's public defenders team up for the inaugural Concerts for Indigent Defense. Lindsey Hortenstine and Stephen Saloom talk about the importance of raising awareness to the Sixth Amendment Right to Counsel. 

And we're kicking off New Orleans Entrepreneur Week! Victoria Adams Phipps, Executive Producer of NOEW, shares the schedule of events for this unique festival experience which celebrates the city's entrepreneurial ecosystem. 

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show with Harry Shearer: The Appresidentice: Trump and Rup, Somebody Else's Babies, News of the Warm, News of the Olympic MovementNews of the Atom, The Apologies of the Week, and more!

History tells us that traveling in medieval times was very interesting for the various countries that could be visited. Naturally traveling in those days took more time then today. This Continuum presents music depicting some of those interesting journeys. Recordings uses are: Traveler (The Waverly Consort) - Angel CDC 7243 5 55559 2 2, and Schiarazula Marazula (Musica Antiqua) - Cantas C 9605.

Claire Bangser

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

Le Petit Salon: A Vieux Carré Memoir

Mar 17, 2017
The Historic New Orleans Collection

While most clubs in New Orleans come together to parade, one of the oldest is all about the written word. Le Petit Salon formed in 1924 as a space for women intellectuals in the French Quarter to gather after performances at Le Petit Theatre. The salon is still around today, and Genevieve Trimble is the longest running member. In this edition of NOLA Life Stories, Genevieve describes her return to New Orleans in the 1940s and the literary encounters that followed.

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