On this program Continuum presents complete recordings of the earliest English songs in existence. They come from the two important collections, The Worcester Fragments and a collection known only as The Earliest Songbook of England. Both contain anonymous music from 13th and 14th century England. The songs are performed by two outstanding vocal ensembles. Recordings used are: The Earliest Songbook in England (Gothic Voices) - Helios CDH55297; The Worcester Fragments (Orlando Consort) - Amon Ra CD-SAR 59; and Go from my Window (Colin Tilney) - Dorian DOR90195

Ramon Vargas as Rodolfo and Barbara Frittoli as Mimì in Puccini's La Boheme.
Marty Sohl / Metropolitan Opera

The 2015-16 Metropolitan Opera Radio Broadcast season – the company’s 85th on the air – begins with a live broadcast of the beloved Puccini opera, La Bohème. New Orleans-area listeners can enjoy this live performance on the Classical WWNO stream, Saturday December 5, at 12:00 noon Central Time.

Tune in to Classical WWNO at home on your computer or smartphone at, stream through our mobile apps, or tune in with your HD radio at 89.9 HD2.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

When it comes to business, we all agree on one thing: we all want to succeed. Typically we measure success numerically -- the more profit we make the better we’re doing. Sure, we’d all like to make billions, but the reality is most of us are not going to turn our businesses into Facebook or Apple. For many people in business, just keeping the doors open and the lights on is succeeding.


Think back on how you first learned about Thanksgiving. You might have been told the Native Americans and Pilgrims came together in peace and everything was harmonious. Years later, you realized the story is more complicated. But what if you learned the full story from the start?

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

Climate change and environmental pollution disproportionately impact people of color. In New Orleans, Dr. Beverly Wright is working to change that. She started the Deep South Center for Environmental Justice, which is now housed at Dillard University, and has worked for many years to highlight the environmental and health inequities in the Lower Mississippi River Industrial Corridor, commonly referred to as "Cancer Alley."

Credit: Community Visions Unlimited

This week on Inside the Arts… the New Orleans Street Gallery Project is decreasing blight across the city, one utility box at a time.  We talk with Jeannie Tidy, vice-president of Community Visions Unlimited.

Then, a prolific but elusive 19th century architect’s works come to light in a new exhibit at the Historic New Orleans Collection. We explore An Architect and His City: Henry Howard’s New Orleans with the HNOC’s John Lawrence.

And, we journey down the bayou with artist Aron Belka as he explores the wetlands in a new exhibit opening at LeMieux Galleries. 

The Reading Life celebrates its fifth anniversary with photographer Judi Bottoni and writer Peggy Scott Laborde, whose new book is "New Orleans Mardi Gras Moments."

We'll also hear from performance artist Tim Youd, whose new project is retyping 100 Novels in 10 Years. He'll be in New Orleans to celebrate five of the novels on his list, retyping them at various locations and headquartered at the New Orleans Museum of Art.

Eve Abrams

The Hudson Thomas Program is a workforce training program of the Southeast Louisiana Veterans Healthcare System aimed at increasing the fundamental skills needed to advance the careers of incumbent employees. The program focuses on competencies in reading, writing and computer literacy, as well as soft skills and career coaching. The goal of this program is to increase the number of entry-level workers eligible to apply for mid level positions within the growing VA system. 

Joyce N. Boghosian / The White House

Leah Chase: say the name and New Orleanians know exactly who you’re talking about. She’s a great chef, a civil rights activist, and an avid art collector. And it’s not a stretch to say that – to some people – she’s the maternal figure of the city. On this edition of Nola Life Stories, Leah Chase, in her own words.  

This interview was conducted by Mark Cave for the Historic New Orleans Collection.

A marsh restoration project at work.
Tegan Wendland / WWNO

There is a federal law that says when wetlands are destroyed by development or industry, they must be replaced somewhere nearby. It is a provision of the Clean Water Act in place since 1980, but it’s getting new attention because of increased industrial development in Louisiana.