News

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show, Harry Shearer brings us We're Not #1, News of the Godly, World of Microplastics, News of the Warm, “Inside Extra Access Tonight: Sag Man” Radio Skit, Let Me Tell You About the Bees, News of the Atom, Apologies of the Week, original music selections by Harry, and more.

This week on The Reading Life: Susan talks with Louis Maistros, author of “The Sound of Building Coffins,” who has just published a revised, expanded version of this book. Poet Melinda Palacio talks about what went into her most recent collection, “Bird Forgiveness.”

Audio extra: Melinda Palacio read's poem, How to Wash a Duck from “Bird Forgiveness”

July 15 calendar

The Estampie was one of the most popular of medieval dances. It exists in many forms in French, Italian and Catalan manuscripts. It is not known exactly how this dance was performed but listening to the music it is very obvious that it was a fast moving event. On this program you'll hear “Mostly Estampies” performed by three outstanding early music ensembles. Recordings used will be: A l'Estampida (Dufay Collective) - Continuum CCD 1042, Estampies et Danses Royales du Moyen Age (Loinhdana) - Pierre Verany PV790043, and Estanpitta! 14th Century Dances (N.Y.)

  

  On this week's show, we take a deep dive into the cuisine of our friends in the animal kingdom.

We begin at the Audubon Zoo, where zookeepers forge a nurturing connection with each animal they care for -- especially at meal time. Curators Liz Wilson and Dominique Fleitas invite us along as they make their daily rounds at the Zoo.

Travis Lux / WWNO

 

New Orleans is a city that floods. Even a small storm can leave streets impassable. City officials say they’re working on solutions, but they’re also asking citizens to help out.

All this week we’ve aired stories about how prepared the city is for the threats that climate change will bring — heavier rains, bigger storms, extreme temperatures — and there are some serious doubts. That’s why some people are taking matters into their own hands.

Petit Paris Market

Bastille Day arrives on July 14, and in this tricentennial year, the holiday prompts a reflection on the city’s French heritage. Kyly La Riviere is strengthening the French-Louisianan connection by bringing a little bit of Paris to New Orleans at Petit Paris Market on Magazine Street. 

American Routes Shortcuts: Don Was

Jul 13, 2018
Don Was
American Routes

Record maven Don Was developed an ear for music in the Motor City. He made his way into studio recording with his band, Was Not Was, teaching himself how to pick and mix music. After striking out for LA in pursuit of his destiny, Don began racking up Grammys as a producer. He’s worked alongside Bryan Wilson, the Rolling Stones and Randy Newman, among others.  In 2012, Don became president of Blue Note Records, the label that introduced him to his love of music.

PJ Morton
Chris Granger

The most heavily traveled road in American music begins in black church congregations, (i.e., Baptist, AME, and Pentecostal, among others), and leads to any and all forms of secular music. That’s the road PJ Morton took, and it has led him on a remarkable professional journey. Morton’s skill set is rooted in gospel music — he grew up the son of two preachers. But as an award-winning songwriter, singer, and producer, as well as the keyboardist in the platinum-selling group Maroon 5, and head of the New Orleans-based Morton Records, he seems especially charmed.

Ian McNulty

When we talk about diversity in New Orleans restaurants, it usually means minority representation, or to put it plainly, with black-owned restaurants.

Rain clouds gather over Esperanza Charter School in Mid-City. The neighborhood was hard hit during the flooding of August 2017.
Jess Clark / WWNO - New Orleans Public Radio

Climate change is bringing more intense weather — more rain, heat and storms. And in New Orleans, extreme weather is disruptive. People park their cars up on curbs, and miss work — and school. It turns out kids missed a lot of school this past year, largely because of aging infrastructure failing during extreme weather.

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