COASTAL DESK

Travis Lux / WWNO

New Orleans: Ready Or Not? Taking Matters Into Our Own Hands

New Orleans is a city that floods. Even a small storm can leave streets impassable. City officials say they’re working on solutions, but they’re also asking citizens to help out. All this week we’ve aired stories about how prepared the city is for the threats that climate change will bring — heavier rains, bigger storms, extreme temperatures — and there are some serious doubts. That’s why some people are taking matters into their own hands.

Read More

CULTURE

PJ Morton
Chris Granger

Music Inside Out: PJ Morton

The most heavily traveled road in American music begins in black church congregations, (i.e., Baptist, AME, and Pentecostal, among others), and leads to any and all forms of secular music. That’s the road PJ Morton took, and it has led him on a remarkable professional journey. Morton’s skill set is rooted in gospel music — he grew up the son of two preachers. But as an award-winning songwriter, singer, and producer, as well as the keyboardist in the platinum-selling group Maroon 5, and head...

Read More

CLICK HERE FOR THE LATEST FROM NPR NEWS

Trump Says He Sees The European Union As A 'Foe' Of U.S.

President Trump has said he has "low expectations" ahead of a summit with Russia's Vladimir Putin, and added that he sees the European Union as a "foe" of the U.S. He made the comments in an interview with CBS that aired on Face the Nation , during a visit to Europe that has tested relations with some of the U.S.'s most important allies. "I go in with very low expectations. I think that getting along with Russia is a good thing," Trump told the program. "But it's possible we won't." The...

Read More

New Orleans: Ready Or Not? The Storms Will Come

Jul 12, 2018
Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

Improvements to the federal hurricane protection system mean New Orleans is better prepared for storms than ever before. But just outside the levees, coastal land loss continues to be a threat. To address it experts say officials need to come to terms with what it means to be a coastal city.

 

Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

Climate change is bringing more extreme temperatures —- the last decade was the warmest on record. Scientists say that pattern will continue.

In Louisiana, temperatures could increase by 10 degrees by the end of the century. Heat stresses human health and the electric grid. How prepared is New Orleans for the heat?

Results from the 2018 state standardized tests show New Orleans-area students are trailing their peers statewide.
midnightpeace_90 / Flickr

On average, kids in Louisiana public schools tested slightly better on their standardized tests this year. But New Orleans-area kids still trail behind the state, and achievment gaps for certain groups of students remain persistent.

 

This year kids were tested in math, social studies and English language arts (ELA). The state raised the bar this year for what it means to be on grade level - students now have to score at the “mastery" level to meet the standard.

 

 

 

This week on Inside the Arts, bold colors pop on an unusual canvas. We meet Tajah Olson, an African performance artist from Malawi who uses her face as a tarp. She portrays Goddesses from her country and beyond, captured in photographs on view at Angela King Gallery.

Then, Summer Lyric Theatre continues its 51st season with Ragtime. Director Michael McKelvey joins us with actors Leslie Castay and Brandon Nase.

Michael Isaac Stein / The Lens

Scientists say climate change will bring heavier rains and more intense storms. City officials have acknowledged that New Orleans needs to rethink how it deals with rain — by reducing reliance on mechanical pumps and managing the water where it falls.

Thanks to a post-Katrina settlement with FEMA, the city has more than $2 billion to fix streets and drainage — a perfect opportunity to try some new ideas. But will it?

Susan Larson continues our discussion of food books with Judy Walker about cocktail guides.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

New Orleans is vulnerable. Even a small storm can wipe out power for thousands of homes. Scientists say climate change is going to bring more intense storms, heavier rainfall and increased heat. More than a decade after Hurricane Katrina, officials say the city is more protected than ever. But big storms are just one threat. This week, WWNO explores how prepared the city is for the threats that climate change will bring with a special Coastal Desk series, New Orleans: Ready Or Not?

NOAA

This week on the Coastal News Roundup: WWNO’s Travis Lux talked with Tristan Baurick from Nola.com/The Times Picayune about hurricane season, deep-sea coral protections, and the latest on the plague of dying roseau cane.

 

 

This week on The Reading Life: Susan Larson talks with novelist Kent Wascom, whose third novel in the Woolsack saga is “The New Inheritors.” We’ll also hear from Heather Veneziano, one of the editors and contributors to "Gateway to New Orleans, Bayou St. John, 1708-2018,” a gorgeous history/architectural survey of one of the city's most beloved neighborhoods.

Here’s what’s on tap in the literary life this week:

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

This week on Le Show Harry Shearer brings us a tribute to the late Henry Butler with excerpts from an interview the two conducted, a performance from Butler at the South By Southwest Conference & Festival, and reflections about his life from other New Orleans piano players, Tom McDermott and David Torkanowsky. Plus, new editions of News of Dominion, News of the Warm, and the Apologies of the Week.

Pages

Classical 104.9 FM

New Orleans’ source for 24-hour classical music.

LE SHOW

Harry Shearer
Harry Shearer / Harry Shearer

Le Show For The Week Of July 15, 2018

This week on Le Show, Harry Shearer brings us We're Not #1, News of the Godly, World of Microplastics, News of the Warm, “Inside Extra Access Tonight: Sag Man” Radio Skit, Let Me Tell You About the Bees, News of the Atom, Apologies of the Week, original music selections by Harry, and more.

Read More
How prepared is New Orleans for the challenges that climate change will bring in coming years? WWNO and The Lens explore this question with a special series.

THE READING LIFE

The Reading Life with Louis Maistros and Melinda Palacio

This week on The Reading Life: Susan talks with Louis Maistros, author of “The Sound of Building Coffins,” who has just published a revised, expanded version of this book. Poet Melinda Palacio talks about what went into her most recent collection, “Bird Forgiveness.” Audio extra: Melinda Palacio read's poem, How to Wash a Duck from “Bird Forgiveness” July 15 calendar Here’s what’s on tap in the literary life this week: Lexi Ostrow signs “ A Heavenly Kind of Love ,” Sunday, July 15, at 2 at...

Read More

FOOD & DINING

Ian McNulty

Where Y’Eat: Digging Into Restaurant Diversity, In More Ways Than One

When we talk about diversity in New Orleans restaurants, it usually means minority representation, or to put it plainly, with black-owned restaurants.

Read More

TRICENTENNIAL READING LIST

Susan Larson, host of The Reading Life, talks with local authors and readers about their favorite books from three hundred years of New Orleans literature.