world war ii

Immigration buildings at what was 'Camp Algiers' circa 1916.
THE HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION, GIFT OF MR. AND MRS. PETER BERNARD, ACC. NO. 1984.112.228 / HISTORIC NEW ORLEANS COLLECTION

Tripod New Orleans at 300 returns with Part II of its series on Camp Algiers, an internment camp that detained Latin Americans during World War II. Listen to Part I here.

Quarantine Station in Algiers La.
The Historic New Orleans Collection, acc. no. 1995.19 / Historic New Orleans Collection

TriPod New Orleans at 300 returns with Part I of a two-part series about a World War II era internment camp in Algiers that held those suspicious of affiliations with axis powers. Listen to Part II here

Ibonzer/CreativeCommons

Sixty eight years ago this week — May 8, 1945 to be exact — the Second World War ended in Europe with the signing of the official documents in Berlin. But, for one group of British military women, it would be more than 30 years before they were allowed to talk about their secret role in that devastating conflict.

Sharon Litwin had the chance to speak with one of them for this week's Notes from New Orleans; she filed this report from the back patio of a charming, soft-spoken resident of Covington, Louisiana.

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. John Hogan was killed in action. But not recently, and not in Afghanistan. He was a young gunner on a bombing mission during World War II when his B-17 was shot down over Germany.

Now, 70 years later, Hogan will be buried in Arlington National Cemetery with full military honors.

Back in 1944, the small, tight-knit town of West Plains, Mo., was knocked to its knees when one of its brightest and most promising young men went missing overseas.