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Rebecca Catalanello

The Louisiana Prison Education Coalition approaches education with a 360-degree model. They aim to ensure individuals in the prison system can achieve their educational goals, and they seek to educate the public about prison. Professor Elizabeth Steeby joins NolaVie’s Kelley Crawford in the studio to talk more about the Coalition’s work within the Orleans Justice Center.   

Visit ViaNolaVie for a related article written by Kelley Crawford.

The Midlo Center for New Orleans Studies

New Orleans is a city of stories, stories that weave a collective tapestry of a rich and colorful past. Students in the history department at UNO have been spinning these threads into a collection of app-based tours called New Orleans Historical. NolaVie's Renee Peck speaks with historian Molly Mitchell to learn more.  

The Creative Writing Workshop at the University of New Orleans and WWNO are launching a new collaboration called Storyville, which will bring true stories about New Orleans to listeners of public radio.

Select nonfiction stories, written and read by UNO students pursuing a Master of Fine Arts degree in Creative Writing, will be broadcast on WWNO and available for listening through podcasts archived on our website. Full scripts of the stories and author biographies will also be posted online.

Four New Orleans universities are included in the new Princeton Review guide to American colleges. Tulane, Loyola, Xavier and the University of New Orleans got high marks.

The University of New Orleans has been awarded grants totaling $5 million over a five-year period by the Upward Bound program through the U. S. Department of Education.

The grants will fund three projects: UNO's Project Pass, UNO's Jefferson Upward Bound and UNO's Classic Upward Bound.

NEW ORLEANS (AP) — When officials from the United States arrived in newly acquired Louisiana in 1804 to consider the prospects of the area for statehood, they found a bewildering landscape that could not have been more different from the New England countryside that gave birth to the nation just a few decades earlier.

The federal group found a population made up almost entirely of French-speakers, a third of whom were free people of color.

The delegation was perplexed, according to Connie Zeanah Atkinson, professor of U.S. history at the University of New Orleans.