theater

Jose Garcia / Southern Rep

This week on Inside the Arts, the Grammy Award-winning Kronos Quartet celebrates its 40th Anniversary season with a stop in New Orleans. Southern Rep Theater puts a fresh spin on Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice. And, revelers will make a joyful noise as the Central City Festival gets underway.

Airs Tuesdays at 1:00 p.m. and Thursdays at 8:35 a.m.
 

Project 1 Voice

This week on Inside the Artsstaged readings commemorate the 50th Anniversary of the Birmingham church bombing that galvanized the Civil Rights Movement.

Summer Lyric Theater at Tulane University rounds out its 46th season with Cole Porter's most successful musical, Kiss Me, Kate. The multi-Tony Award winning musical opens tonight, and WWNO's Diane Mack goes Inside the Arts for a sneak peek.

Bossier’s Talented Arts Program will present a one-act play this week about the stresses that teenagers face in high school. The play “The Way It Is” explores issues like bullying and teenage suicide.

Benton High School junior Morgann Hutchinson plays a character who copes with helicopter parents. They’re overbearing and push her to the brink.

“This one hits home for me, and it’s probably one of my favorite high school productions," Hutchison said. "I really don’t ever get to act with real passion and emotion behind it where I can actually connect with my character.”

Stories from Da Dirt

Feb 14, 2013

We go Inside the Arts for conversation with Dr. Nancy Dawson, artistic director of the Tennessee based Music is Spirit theater group. She leads her African American historical theater group in Stories From Da Dirt this weekend in New Orleans.

Performances combine stories from the Underground Railroad, women in the Civil War, and the performance of African American spirituals.

Performance Schedule:

Saturday, Feb. 16:

A Broadway Mystery Worthy Of 'Rebecca'

Sep 25, 2012

There's a new mystery on Broadway — one about the musical Rebecca, based on the Daphne du Maurier novel.

You can't see it yet on the New York stage. In fact, it hasn't even started rehearsals. That's because the production is short $4.5 million after one of its investors died before he could hand over the money.

A new show featuring the music and dance moves of New Orleans singer and trumpeter Louis Prima opens next month at the National World War II Museum.

Prima, who was born in 1910 and died in 1978, had a decades-long career spanning the genres of jazz, swing and big band with such hits as "Sing! Sing! Sing!," ''Just A Gigolo," ''Oh Marie," ''That Old Black Magic" and "Basin Street Blues."

It all began last year, when the Library of Congress presented Samuel Beckett's Ohio Impromptu alongside a piece of music by composer Dina Koston, which responded to the text. A New York group, the Cygnus Ensemble, played the music, while Washington, D.C., director Joy Zinoman staged the play, for one night only.

During the next two weeks, the major political parties will assemble their faithful in Tampa, Fla., and Charlotte, N.C., to officially nominate their presidential tickets. These conventions were once places of high political drama. But over the decades, as the primary system has determined the candidates well in advance, conventions have become political theater. With that in mind, there's much to be said on staging in politics — not substance, but style.

This week on Inside the Arts you'll hear about a three-day birthday bash honoring the life, legacy and music of Louis Armstrong... we'll sashay down Julia Street for Whitney White Linen Night celebrations, throw a little poetry into the mix, and tackle tradition with a popular Broadway musical opening Uptown.

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