technology

Adam Fagen / Flickr

After a long campaign to get permission to operate in New Orleans, the Uber car service app will become available for use locally  -- with a minimum fare of $15.

The City Council cleared the way for Uber’s operation with a 4-3 vote on Thursday.

A handful of companies that are hiring hundreds of tech workers were handpicked to participate in a hiring event Wednesday at the Shreveport Convention Center.

Officials with Louisiana Economic Development’s workforce development program called FastStart put on a digital jobs interview event for companies like IBM, CGI and CenturyLink.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

A few years ago, for most of us "start up" was a verb — it was something you did to a car. These days it's a noun. A startup is a new business, typically based on a new and untested idea.

One of the toughest things about a startup, the noun, is the verb — starting it up. The main obstacles are figuring out the best way to go about it, and how to pay for it. One place startups turn to start up is an angel investor. Having an angel investor is kind of like having a successful uncle who believes in you enough to give you some capital and guidance.

Cheryl DalPozzal / It's New Orleans

Human beings love doing things in groups. It starts off with fun birthday parties when we're kids, and goes all the way to desperate attempts to have fun at conferences — which is why so many of them come to New Orleans.

While folks are here at a conference, Teddy Nathan's company, Crescent City Connections, rounds them up and puts them to work volunteering for local non-profits.

Grant Morris / It's New Orleans

The vacuum created when NASA left the Michoud facility in New Orleans East has been filled by a range of new, innovative aero-space and robotic manufacturers. Among them, Crescent Unmanned Systems and NVision Solutions.

Grant Morris / It's New Orleans

Sure, New Orleans business is doing better than it has in decades (if not ever)... but in your wildest imaginings it's unlikely you've had any idea that "the sky's the limit" has, in the last few years, gone from being a visionary fantasy to an aerospace reality. While many are still evoking the New Orleans credentials of being the birthplace of jazz and the cocktail, two extraordinary local businessmen are giving us, literally, a whole new world to brag about.

SchuminWeb

Employers and schools in Louisiana will be prohibited from demanding access to personal email, social media and other types of online accounts.

Gov. Bobby Jindal's office announced Friday that the governor has signed into law the bill by Baton Rouge Rep. Ted James, which is called the "Personal Online Account Privacy Protection Act."

The measure bans employers and public schools, including colleges, from requesting usernames, passwords or other authentication information that allows them to access personal online accounts.

Grant Morris / It's New Orleans

There are a lot of people these days claiming how well New Orleans is doing and that in business terms we're now competitive with almost any city in the country. If you'd like proof that this is fact, and not just feel-good boosterism, this edition of Out to Lunch might convince you.

Leonardo Augusto Matsuda / Creative Commons

The Louisiana state education department recently found that one-third of school districts are falling short when it comes to computers. The state suggests one computer for every seven students.

Three districts — Cameron, St. Helena and St. James parishes — have reached a one-to-one ratio of students to computers. Most New Orleans schools, because they’re charters, were not included in the report. But technology in the classroom getting attention because of upcoming changes to testing.

Louisiana Tech University is set to host its first conference on business analytics next month at its Shreveport Center. The discussion will focus on how to harness "big data" – all that valuable information people generate day after day. 

The ability to take big data and turn it into useful information for businesses cuts across all sectors, according to Jim Cochran, a professor of quantitative methods. Cochran has assembled a variety of speakers on big data.

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