teachers

 

Investigative journalism site The Lens features a story by Sarah Carr today. Carr looks at a Louisiana program that uses student test scores to evaluate teacher training programs. The education reporter sat down with WWNO's Eve Troeh to talk about her latest work, which Carr says could transform teacher training in Louisiana and across the nation.

The number of teachers retiring jumped more than 25 percent as the administration of Gov. Bobby Jindal pushed an overhaul of public education that changes the rules on how teachers are evaluated. That's according to the Teachers Retirement System of Louisiana.

The Advocate reports the number of retirements from public kindergarten through 12th-grade schools has hovered around 2,500 in recent years: 2,598 for the 2011 fiscal year; 2,512 during the previous fiscal year.

Louisiana's top school board is about to consider several changes in the state's new method for evaluating public school teachers. One of the changes includes making it easier for new teachers to land job security.

The Advocate reports the issue is one of several high-profile topics to be discussed when the state Board of Elementary and Secondary Education meets on Tuesday and Wednesday.

It was a major accomplishment in Chicago that teachers who used to walk out frequently had, for the past 25 years, managed to avoid a strike. But it's not surprising, many experts say, that things would fall apart now.

"I think it is a perfect storm," says Tim Knowles, head of the University of Chicago's Urban Education Institute. He says issues in Chicago — of tying teacher pay to student test scores, job security, longer school days and expanding charter schools, for example — are not unlike issues unions have grappled with in other cities, from New York to Los Angeles.

The existing contract for Detroit teachers was ripped up and chucked into the trash by the school district's emergency financial manager. The teachers' union is angry and making noise about a possible strike.

The Orleans Parish School Board's attorney says the board should appeal a ruling that thousands of New Orleans teachers and other school workers were wrongfully fired after Hurricane Katrina shut down the city and scattered its people in 2005.

William Aaron said Thursday he will recommend that the board take state Civil District Judge Ethel Simms Julien's decision to the state 4th Circuit Court of Appeal.

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