storytelling

Bring Your Own Presents: 'Irish Goodbye'

Jan 7, 2016
Alicia Cooke

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

This story was told on August 15, 2015 at the Nims Theater on UNO’s campus. The theme of the evening was "Too Good To Be True," and here, winner Alicia Cooke shares of a time when she was young and in love, and how, well, at least she got a story out of it. 

Karen Gardner

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

This story was told on April 2, 2015 at 218 S. Jefferson Davis Parkway and later produced by Natalie Yahr. The theme of the evening was "Secret Weapon", and here, BYO Producer Karen Gardner tells of love, loss and unpredictability.

Infrogmation / Wikimedia Commons

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in living rooms, backyards and unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

Anyone can tell a story at The Moth. Including... you?
Jason Saul / WWNO

The Moth is back for November, with a monthly StorySLAM at Café Istanbul, featuring stories by… maybe you? If you want to tell a story at The Moth, or know someone who'd be perfect, see all the details below. Throw your name in the hat or just come to listen!

Come join us for "Gifted" on Tuesday, November 10

Bring Your Own Presents: '210 Frances'

Oct 1, 2015
Noelle Deltufo / Bring Your Own

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in living rooms, backyards and unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

Bring Your Own Presents: 'In The East'

Sep 24, 2015
Claire Bangser

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in living rooms, backyards and unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

Bring Your Own Presents: 'Sunday Thriller'

Sep 8, 2015
Claire Bangser / Bring Your Own

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in living rooms, backyards and unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

Bring Your Own Presents: 'The Rev'

Sep 2, 2015
Edward J Cloos III in all his madras glory.
Edward Cloos

Bring Your Own is a nomadic storytelling series that takes place in living rooms, backyards and unconventional spaces within the community. Each month, eight storytellers have eight minutes to respond to a theme. BYO airs on All Things New Orleans and is a biweekly podcast on WWNO.org.

Ten years ago, when Hurricane Katrina hit New Orleans, it was the city's Lower Ninth Ward that was hit the hardest.

"I remember coming back home," Lower Ninth resident Burnell Cotlon told his mother, Lillie, on a recent visit with StoryCorps. "That was the first time I cried."

"We lost everything," Lillie says.

Lisa Richardson, left, is the Director of Research & Evaluation at the Institute of Women & Ethnic Studies. Denese Shervington, right, is its President & CEO.
StoryCorps

For a couple of years after Hurricane Katrina, New Orleans’ narrative belonged to the people who endured the storm and those who helped rebuild after it. But as time went on and the city recovered, things changed. New demographics emerged and people started talking about “the new New Orleans.”

These changes left many people, including psychiatrist Denese Shervington and urban anthropologist Lisa Richardson, wondering about the city’s new identity and their place in it.

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