state legislature

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Public school teachers and most new state employees would have to wait longer to retire, under a proposal that received the unanimous backing of the state Senate Wednesday.

Current law generally allows that non-hazardous employees in the Louisiana State Employees' Retirement System, the Teachers' Retirement System of Louisiana and the Louisiana School Employees' Retirement System can retire at age 60 with 5 years of service.

 With less than a month left in the session, the full Senate spent most of Tuesday afternoon digging through a mountain of House bills awaiting final passage. More than 120 House bills were on the Senate’s to-do list, and the upper chamber managed to complete the legislative process on about half of those.

Louisiana got some bad news from the federal Center for Medicaid Services (CMS) late last Friday. CMS says “no deal” on six of the LSU hospital public-private partnerships.

“I don’t know what their issue is, but it appears that the basis for the denial is related to the means of financing—specifically as it relates to the advance lease payments,” Commissioner of Administration Kristy Nichols told the House Appropriations committee Monday.

 If you can’t get lethal injection drugs, how do you impose the death penalty?

"We have the death sentence. Whether some of you agree with that or disagree with it, that's what we have,” said House Criminal Justice committee chairman Joe Lopinto. “If we're going to have that we need to be able, as a state, to follow through with that order."

Tom Arthur

House Speaker Chuck Kleckley is calling a special election in November to fill a vacant state House seat representing part of New Orleans.

Rep. Jared Brossett, a Democrat from New Orleans, resigned from the House of Representatives this week to take an elected seat on the New Orleans City Council.

Kleckley set the special election to fill the House District 97 seat to coincide with the Nov. 4 congressional elections being held around Louisiana. A runoff, if needed, will be held Dec. 6.

Qualifying for candidates is set for Aug. 20 through Aug. 22.

Insight: What Goes Up (for Debate) Often Comes Down

May 2, 2014

A couple of high-profile bills were on the Louisiana legislature's docket in the past week, both were dashed. A proposal to allow for medical marijuana was rejected and the possibility for the return of the electric chair was commuted to a more palatable proposal for shielding suppliers of lethal injection drugs.


The Senate Education Committee took testimony on the MFP Thursday, and ended up rejecting the formula for funding public schools.

The formula included $150-million in new spending: for a growing number of students, for career education and for kids with special needs. On a conference call following the committee meeting, state Superintendent John White said he’s not worried about students losing out, despite the formula being turned away. That’s because House Appropriations already added the extra money to HB 1, the next state budget.

Fair housing advocates in New Orleans are supporting legislation that would protect domestic violence victims from eviction. Apartment management groups want to make sure the rules are clear.

A Senate-approved bill to prohibit the camera-equipped unmanned aircraft known as drones from overflying chemical plants and refineries crashed and burned in the House Criminal Justice Committee Tuesday.

“Drones are becoming more and more prevalent,” explained the bill’s author, Baton Rouge Senator Bodi White. “And it’s just an effort to try to at least have some rules or laws for the state of Louisiana with our critical infrastructure.”

  “There’s no one-time money for recurring expenditures in the budget,” Commissioner of Administration Kristy Nichols guaranteed from the start of this year’s budget process. Yet as the House Appropriations Committee worked to modify and approve Governor Jindal’s budget proposal for the upcoming fiscal year, the secret behind “no one-time money” was revealed.