sports

Peter Ricchiuti and guests on this week's Out to Lunch.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

One of the topics in the national debate these days is trade. Meaning imports and exports. On Out to lunch, Peter and his guests take a look at two of the most obscure imports into the United States, and New Orleans. One from Britain, the other from Italy.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Derek Bridges / Flickr

When I woke up and checked the news, I could hardly believe what I was hearing. I stared at my screen in disbelief. This was really happening. This was the new reality. And there was nothing that I could do about it. I had to muster every ounce of inner strength I had just to say the words, to make them real, to accept that this was the truth.

“The New Orleans Zephyrs are now...the New Orleans Baby Cakes.”

Finn McCool's New Owner Takes A Seat at the Pub

Nov 3, 2016
J. Regan / Flickr

Sean Kennedy has been known as the Irishman and patron of Finn McCool’s, and he’s now known as the Irishman and new owner of Finn McCool’s. After years of working tirelessly and building a tight community in their Mid-City pub, Stephen and Pauline Patterson have passed the torch on to Sean, who’s more than up to the challenge. Especially if there’s soccer involved.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Kelley Crawford.  

NEW ORLEANS -- Noted New Orleans sportswriter Peter Finney has died.

He passed away Saturday at his home. Finney was 88.

The New Orleans Advocate reports that Finney’s career spanned seven decades. He began with the New Orleans States Item in the summer of 1945, covering American Legion baseball shortly after graduating from Jesuit High School.

Donna Light and Mark Olalde.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

Running a sports business in New Orleans comes with a number of unique challenges. Ask the Voodoo, the Jazz, or for many years the struggling Saints.

Peter's talking talking New Orleans baseball and New Orleans motor racing on this week's Out to Lunch.

In 1834, artist George Catlin witnessed Choctaw lacrosse in Indian Territory near present-day Oklahoma.
George Catlin / Smithsonian American Art Museum

TriPod: New Orleans at 300 returns with a new story about an indigenous sport that became popular before the Civil War.


Peter Ricchiuti.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

Just by living in New Orleans you can naturally develop a lot of useful skills. Dodging potholes and catching Mardi Gras beads improves hand-eye coordination. Peeling crawfish increases dexterity.

The Purple Knights pose on the court; Harold Sylvester is kneeling next to his coach.
Harold Sylvester / Amistad Research Center

TriPod -- New Orleans at 300 revisits the first integrated high school sports contest in Louisiana, on February 25, 1965.

Leon Trice, photographer / Historic New Orleans Collection

On January 1, 1935 Americans were dealing with some big issues: the Great Depression had crippled the economy and the Dust Bowl had scoured the land. But down in New Orleans the mood was celebratory: football players getting ready to meet each other at the inaugural Sugar Bowl.

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