Southern Food and Beverage Museum

The Southern Food And Beverage Museum sits at the intersection of Oretha Castle Haley Blvd. and Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.
The Southern Food And Beverage Museum / Facebook

It's hard to believe that it has been a whole year since we moved our Louisiana Eats! studio into the Southern Food and Beverage Museum. On this week's show, we celebrate this one-year anniversary by meeting our neighbors in the Oretha Castle Haley Boulevard corridor in Central City.

"Absinthe Robette" lithograph by Henri Privat-Livemont from 1896, at the peak of absinthe's popularity.
Library of Congress

From the height of its popularity in the 19th century to its modern revival, absinthe has a long and storied reputation. On this week's Louisiana Eats!, we learn all about the formerly illicit elixir, and those whose ongoing fascination with the spirit has helped transform the discourse and regulations here in the United States.

Photo Courtesy Modernist Cuisine LLC

This week on Inside the Arts we explore The Photography of Modernist Cuisine, an exhibit by Microsoft co-founder  Nathan Myhrvold.

The exhibit which explores the science of food is on view at the Southern Food and Beverage Museum through February 29.  We talk with exhibit co-curator Melissa Lukach.

SoFAB Institute

Some museums offer a chance to connect with the highest achievements of art and ingenuity, to gaze over priceless wonders or to better understand pivotal moments of human history.

At the Southern Food & Beverage Museum, some of what resonates most richly may be artifacts you once had in your pantry or old brand names whose jingles are still stuck in your head.

You’re less likely to swoon over some rarified treasure as to delight in the recognition of something tied up with your own traditions and ties to the region’s food culture.  

Chris Kehoe

Big news on this week’s Louisiana Eats! We move into our new studios, located in the Southern Food and Beverage Museum on Oretha Castle Haley in Central City.

Nina Feldman / WWNO

Everything about the Southern Food and Beverage Museum is a tribute to the legacy of food in southern states — even its physical building.

Architect Jonathan Tate says the new SOFAB building took on a number of identities over the years. It was originally the Dryades Market. During WWII it was a motor pool for the military; it was a jeweler and the Ocean Seafood Market.

“What we did here in terms of the design is peel all of that away, so what you see here is what the market might’ve looked like in the 1930s,” said Tate.

This week on The Reading Life: We’ll talk with Liz Williams, founder of the Southern Food and Beverage Museum, and library director Charles Brown about the new culinary library the museum is starting with the New Orleans Public Library. And we’ll hear from all around book person Abi Pollokoff — award-winning poet, Tulane Review editor, and Pelican Publishing editor. Susan also reviews the book Alif the Unseen.