Science & Health

Classics in Concert
1:27 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

Spring For Music: The Houston Symphony's Subversive, Sardonic Shostakovich

The Houston Symphony and conductor Hans Graf presented an all-Shostakovich evening for their evening at the Spring for Music festival at Carnegie Hal on May 7, 2012. They played two rarely heard works in powerful performances: the bitingly satirical Anti-Formalist Rayok, with soloist Mikhail Svetlov (pictured), as well as the gargantuan Symphony No. 11.
Torsten Kjellstrand Torsten Kjellstrand for NPR

Originally published on Tue April 15, 2014 2:48 pm

PROGRAM

  • SHOSTAKOVICH Anti-Formalist Rayok
  • SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 11 in G Minor, Op. 103, "The Year 1905"
  • Encore: LIADOV Baba Yaga
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World
1:09 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

The Charles Taylor Case And International Justice

Originally published on Thu April 26, 2012 1:43 pm

Former Liberian President Charles Taylor was found guilty by an international tribunal of planning, aiding and abetting war crimes during the 1990s. This marks the first time since World War II that a current or former head of state was convicted by a tribunal of crimes committed while in office.

It's All Politics
1:09 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

Some Campaign Donors Putting Their Money Where Their Mouth Isn't

Much of the attention on money in politics this election cycle has been focused on the new superPACs, and with good reason.

Recent court rulings allow superPACs — which officially are independent of specific candidates — to raise and spend unlimited money to support their favorite politician or cause.

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NPR Story
1:03 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

'Ball Four': The Book That Changed Baseball

New York Yankees pitcher Jim Bouton holds two balls that his teammates hope will lead them to victory in the 1964 World Series.
AP

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 11:53 am

Fifty years ago, a young pitcher won his first major league game for the New York Yankees. Jim Bouton went on to become a top-flight player.

But he became famous, or notorious, for Ball Four, a memoir that described the petty jealousies on the team, as well as camaraderie, raucous tomcatting, game-winning heroics, routine drug use and the pain professional athletes endure.

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NPR Story
12:59 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

America's 'Great Divergence' Is Relatively New

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 11:05 am

Thirty years ago, CEOs of America's largest businesses earned an estimated 42 times as much as their average employee. These days, that number has jumped to more than 200 times as much, by many counts. Since the economic crisis of 2008, there has been much more focus on income inequality, not just from economists and social scientists, but also from politicians and from protesters who occupied Wall Street.

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Theater
12:56 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

'Best Man' John Larroquette Takes Broadway

Sen. Joseph Cantwell, played by Eric McCormack (left), is an ambitious striver who throws mud at his rival, Secretary William Russell, played by John Larroquette, who debates whether to use some dirt of his own in The Best Man.
Joan Marcus

Originally published on Fri April 27, 2012 9:38 am

Perhaps most recognizable for his role as despicable but lovable lawyer Dan Fielding on Night Court, John Larroquette has recently taken to the stage. He earned a Tony Award for his role in the 2011 production of How to Succeed in Business Without Really Trying.

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NPR Bestseller List
12:32 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Week Of April 26, 2012

Compiled from weekly surveys of close to 500 independent bookstores nationwide.

The Two-Way
12:01 pm
Thu April 26, 2012

With A Tweet, A's Player Unleashes Debate: Is 'Kiss Cam' Homophobic?

The video board at Busch Stadium is seen during a popular between-inning feature known as "Kiss Cam."
Jeff Roberson AP

Yesterday, in the San Francisco Chronicle, columnist Gwen Knapp hailed a tweet from an Oakland Athletics' player as the dawn of the "age of enlightenment."

In short, pitcher Brandon McCarthy sent out a tweet that suggested the "Kiss Cam" — a feature shown on scoreboards across the country in which a camera focuses on couples in hopes of a kiss — was anti-gay.

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Movie Reviews
11:56 am
Thu April 26, 2012

Demanding 'Payback' That May Never Come

A migrant Florida tomato grower and member of the Coalition of Immokalee Workers drinks from a jug of water. As part of a larger discussion of societal thinking about debt, Payback looks at the sometimes harsh treatment by companies of migrant workers.
Zeitgeist Films

"Crime doesn't pay" is one of the hopeful cliches Margaret Atwood invokes in her essay collection Payback: Debt and the Shadow Side of Wealth.

Of course it does, filmmaker Jennifer Baichwal shows in Payback, a documentary that riffs on Atwood's themes. But crime doesn't always pay, and perhaps it will pay less well in the future. At least that's the suggestion made by the on-screen commentators who expand on Atwood's original theme.

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Paperback Nonfiction Bestsellers
11:50 am
Thu April 26, 2012

NPR Bestsellers: Paperback Nonfiction, Week Of April 26, 2012

Bossypants — Tina Fey's humorous story of success — is on the list for a 16th week.

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