science

Latest News
7:00 am
Tue July 30, 2013

This Summer's Gulf Dead Zone Smaller Than Feared

2013 Gulf of Mexico dead zone map.
Credit Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium

The low-oxygen dead zone this summer in the Gulf of Mexico is smaller than scientists had predicted. But the area where marine life can’t live is still about the size of Connecticut.

Nancy Rabalais of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium — called LUMCON — expected the gulf dead zone to be bigger, based on the level of nutrients measured in the Mississippi River.

Those nutrients come from fertilizer, used on crops upriver, that is carried downstream.

But choppy weather churned up the water, so the dead zone wasn’t as big as feared.

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Red River Radio
10:17 am
Tue July 16, 2013

American Cancer Society in Shreveport seeks hundreds of study participants

The American Cancer Society aims to recruit 500 people from the Ark-La-Tex to participate in the third generation of a cancer prevention study that first began in the 1960s. The organization has partnered with the YMCA in Shreveport and two other organizations to host sign-up events for the study. It involves taking an initial waist measurement and drawing a small blood sample. 

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WRKF
5:32 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Why Finding Oil in Fish Organs Isn't as Bad as it Looks

Kelly Connelly, WRKF

Originally published on Fri October 31, 2014 10:06 am

Environmental remediation scientists at LSU’s School of the Coast and Environment have found remnants of crude oil in the hearts of pogy that live off Grand Isle.

Pogy, a baitfish more officially called menhaden, make up the second largest commercial catch in the United States. They’re not only resold as baitfish, but they’re also processed into fish oil and fish meal, making their way into vitamins, cosmetics and livestock feeds.

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Science & Health
7:00 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Tulane Researchers Using BP Grant To Develop Less-Toxic Dispersant

A C-130 Hercules from the Air Force Reserve Command's 910th Airlift Wing drops an oil-dispersing chemical into the Gulf of Mexico May 5, 2010, as part of the Deepwater Horizon response effort.
Technical Sergeant Adrian Cadiz US Air Force

Researchers at Tulane University are working on designing a less toxic oil dispersant than the Corexit used on the BP spill in 2010. The goal is using ingredients now approved for human consumption.

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Latest News
3:28 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

Submarine Visit Canceled

Organizers have canceled Wednesday's display in New Orleans of the submarine that director James Cameron took to the deepest part of the ocean.

The Deepsea Challenger was set for public viewing outside the Audubon Aquarium, but a spokesman for the group transporting the submersible says traffic and space limitations made the one-day visit impossible.

The vehicle was driven by Cameron last year to the bottom of the Mariana trench in the western Pacific.

It’s on its way to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute.

Latest News
7:00 am
Tue June 4, 2013

James Cameron's Solo Submarine Heads To New Orleans

The mini-submarine that director James Cameron used to explore the bottom of the sea will be on display Wednesday in New Orleans.

The Deepsea Challenger will be on the plaza outside the Audubon Aquarium from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Scientists will be at the display to explain the submersible’s technology.

Cameron operated the sub by himself. He went more than 35,700 feet under the surface of the western Pacific in March last year — and was able to stay there for three hours.

Science & Health
7:37 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Study Asks if Apps Can Help Pregnant Women Control Weight Gain

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 12:08 pm

Dr. Karen Elkind-Hirsch is part of a group of researchers from Pennington Biomedical Research Center and Woman's Hospital who will be following 306 pregnant women with smartphones.


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Science & Health
3:44 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Shrimp Trawling Comes With Big Risks

John Berthelot, top, and Hosea Wilson, bottom right, release the nets from their shrimp boat, Monday, May 3, 2010, at the Venice Marina in Venice, La.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 5:03 pm

Think your job is bad? Quit whining, unless you're a shrimper in the Gulf of Mexico.

Commercial fishermen have the highest rate of on-the-job fatalities of any occupation in the country — 116 deaths per 100,000 workers in 2010. A majority of the deaths happen when a fishing vessel sinks. About a third occur when someone goes overboard.

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Science & Health
2:33 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Louisiana Has The Highest Rate Of Diabetes In The U.S.

Originally published on Sat April 6, 2013 7:40 pm

Diabetes has multiple complications. Among them are kidney failure, lower limb amputation, blindness and it is a major cause of Heart Disease & Stroke. Dr. Andriette Martin Fitch, with Ochsner on Harding Blvd in Baton Rouge, is personally involved in the areas of Diabetes & Hypertension. She sees patients daily who are not maintaining a healthy lifestyle and spends a great deal of her day sending out the message to both parents & children. Her message to parents, "If you don't want your children, your spouse or your family members to die of Hypertension or Diabetes, make a change in your diet and exercise daily."


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Science & Health
10:34 am
Mon January 28, 2013

UNO Researcher Tackles Testosterone

A University of New Orleans faculty member has been awarded a state grant to develop a device to test testosterone levels in real time.

Elizabeth Shirtcliff was awarded the grant by the Louisiana Board of Regents. She is an early research professor of psychology at UNO ad the principal investigator on the project. Shirtcliff is partnering with researchers from at Oasis Diagnostic Corp. in Canada.

Monitoring testosterone levels is important, Shirtclif said, because rapid imbalances can signal changes in behavior.

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