science

Science & Health
7:00 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Tulane Researchers Using BP Grant To Develop Less-Toxic Dispersant

A C-130 Hercules from the Air Force Reserve Command's 910th Airlift Wing drops an oil-dispersing chemical into the Gulf of Mexico May 5, 2010, as part of the Deepwater Horizon response effort.
Technical Sergeant Adrian Cadiz US Air Force

Tulane chemistry professor Scott Grayson reviews the grant objectives.

Researchers at Tulane University are working on designing a less toxic oil dispersant than the Corexit used on the BP spill in 2010. The goal is using ingredients now approved for human consumption.

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Latest News
3:28 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

Submarine Visit Canceled

Organizers have canceled Wednesday's display in New Orleans of the submarine that director James Cameron took to the deepest part of the ocean.

The Deepsea Challenger was set for public viewing outside the Audubon Aquarium, but a spokesman for the group transporting the submersible says traffic and space limitations made the one-day visit impossible.

The vehicle was driven by Cameron last year to the bottom of the Mariana trench in the western Pacific.

It’s on its way to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute.

Latest News
7:00 am
Tue June 4, 2013

James Cameron's Solo Submarine Heads To New Orleans

The mini-submarine that director James Cameron used to explore the bottom of the sea will be on display Wednesday in New Orleans.

The Deepsea Challenger will be on the plaza outside the Audubon Aquarium from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Scientists will be at the display to explain the submersible’s technology.

Cameron operated the sub by himself. He went more than 35,700 feet under the surface of the western Pacific in March last year — and was able to stay there for three hours.

Science & Health
7:37 am
Sun April 14, 2013

Study Asks if Apps Can Help Pregnant Women Control Weight Gain

Originally published on Mon July 29, 2013 12:08 pm

Dr. Karen Elkind-Hirsch is part of a group of researchers from Pennington Biomedical Research Center and Woman's Hospital who will be following 306 pregnant women with smartphones.

Dr. Karen Elkind-Hirsch, Pennington Biomedical Research Center

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Science & Health
3:44 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Shrimp Trawling Comes With Big Risks

John Berthelot, top, and Hosea Wilson, bottom right, release the nets from their shrimp boat, Monday, May 3, 2010, at the Venice Marina in Venice, La.
Eric Gay AP

Originally published on Thu March 7, 2013 5:03 pm

Think your job is bad? Quit whining, unless you're a shrimper in the Gulf of Mexico.

Commercial fishermen have the highest rate of on-the-job fatalities of any occupation in the country — 116 deaths per 100,000 workers in 2010. A majority of the deaths happen when a fishing vessel sinks. About a third occur when someone goes overboard.

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Science & Health
2:33 pm
Thu March 7, 2013

Louisiana Has The Highest Rate Of Diabetes In The U.S.

Originally published on Sat April 6, 2013 7:40 pm

Diabetes has multiple complications. Among them are kidney failure, lower limb amputation, blindness and it is a major cause of Heart Disease & Stroke. Dr. Andriette Martin Fitch, with Ochsner on Harding Blvd in Baton Rouge, is personally involved in the areas of Diabetes & Hypertension. She sees patients daily who are not maintaining a healthy lifestyle and spends a great deal of her day sending out the message to both parents & children. Her message to parents, "If you don't want your children, your spouse or your family members to die of Hypertension or Diabetes, make a change in your diet and exercise daily."

Dr. Andriette Martin Fitch

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Science & Health
10:34 am
Mon January 28, 2013

UNO Researcher Tackles Testosterone

A University of New Orleans faculty member has been awarded a state grant to develop a device to test testosterone levels in real time.

Elizabeth Shirtcliff was awarded the grant by the Louisiana Board of Regents. She is an early research professor of psychology at UNO ad the principal investigator on the project. Shirtcliff is partnering with researchers from at Oasis Diagnostic Corp. in Canada.

Monitoring testosterone levels is important, Shirtclif said, because rapid imbalances can signal changes in behavior.

Science & Health
11:55 am
Tue December 18, 2012

Loyola Biology Lab Regenerates Limb Joints

Loyola University professor Rosalie Anderson, along with biology major Jeffrey Coote, work to regenerate chicken embryo elbow joints in the lab.
Loyola University

In a biology lab at Loyola University New Orleans, something miraculous happened — something no scientist had seen before. Biology professor Rosalie Anderson and her undergraduate students cut a tiny hole to remove just the elbow joint of a chicken embryo’s wing. Eighteen hours later, a new joint amazingly grew back.

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Science
4:08 pm
Fri October 5, 2012

LSU gets $250K grant to probe universe's origins

Two LSU researchers have won a $250,000 grant to probe the origins of the universe.

Parampreet Singh, an assistant professor in the LSU Department of Physics & Astronomy, and Peter Diener, assistant research professor in the LSU Center for Computation & Technology and in Singh's department, submitted a proposal hoping to answer questions about the earliest state of the university and won the grant funded by the John Templeton Foundation.

The foundation awarded more than $4 million in research grants to 20 scientists worldwide.

BP Oil Spill
1:43 pm
Thu October 4, 2012

Gulf oil spill workers sought for health study

The National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences is making another push to get people who worked on the BP/Deepwater Horizon oil disaster cleanup to enroll in a long-term health study.

Dr. Dale Sandler, chief of the agency's epidemiology branch, said Tuesday that more than 29,000 people have enrolled so far. But, she says, the goal is to get 35,000 to 40,000 people signed up before enrollment in the study ends Dec. 31.

The Advocate reports enrollment started March 2011.

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