science

Science
7:00 am
Tue November 26, 2013

Tulane Researchers Focusing On Urban Rats

Michael Blum, associate professor of ecology and evolutionary biology at Tulane.
Paula Burch-Celentano Tulane University

Tulane University researchers are joining a national project to study how rebuilding after a disaster affects people and the environment. They’ll be starting with a close look at the common rat.

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Red River Radio
8:35 am
Tue November 5, 2013

UL-Lafayette students anticipate the launch of their satellite

Students at University of Louisiana at Lafayette prepare their cube satellite for orbit.

It’s been six years in the making and now the University of Louisiana at Lafayette's cube satellite is hitching a ride into space this month on a NASA rocket. Dozens of undergraduate students have had a hand in CAPE-2. It stands for Cajun Advanced Picosatellite Experiment. Assistant project manager Rizwan Merchant is a senior computer science major from Lafayette. He says his work on CAPE-2 will be his calling card for prospective employers.

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Here & Now
1:52 pm
Wed October 2, 2013

Jellyfish: Are They Taking Over In Sick Oceans?

(Theory/Flickr)

Originally published on Fri September 27, 2013 4:20 pm

Calling man-made warming “extremely likely,” the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change used the strongest words yet to describe how human activity is affecting the earth’s atmosphere and oceans.

Lisa-ann Gershwin sees evidence of global warming and human impact on the environment everyday in her work. She is one of a handful of jellyfish experts in the world.

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Hurricane Season
5:38 am
Fri September 6, 2013

No Hurricanes Yet, But Season Is Far From Over

Originally published on Thu September 5, 2013 4:56 pm

Tropical Storm Gabrielle is hitting Puerto Rico today with 40-mile-per-hour winds and heavy rains.

Gabrielle is the seventh named storm of the season, but so far there hasn’t been a single hurricane — even though we’re about to enter what’s usually considered the peak of the Atlantic hurricane season.

So how rare is this?

Dennis Feltgen, meteorologist and spokesman for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s National Hurricane Center, says it’s rare but not unheard of.

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Shots - Health News
12:19 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Sleeping Pills Most Popular With Older People, Women

The proportion of people in different age groups who have taken sleeping pills in the past 30 days.
CDC

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 7:57 am

If you've had problems sleeping and have taken a pill to help, you're not alone.

About 9 million American adults had taken sleeping pills in the past month, according to findings from a detailed nationwide survey conducted between 2005 and 2010.

Overall, about 4 percent of people 20 and older had taken sleeping pills in the last 30 days, says the report from the National Center for Health Statistics.

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Latest News
7:00 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Governor Jindal Slams BP As Gulf Coast Restoration Plan Is Approved

Five states and leaders of several federal agencies have unanimously approved a blueprint to repair the Gulf of Mexico with BP fines pending over the 2010 oil spill. Governor Bobby Jindal’s comments in New Orleans about BP and his support for Mississippi River diversions drew immediate criticism.

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National Security
8:10 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Leaked NSA Audit Shows It Violated Privacy Rules

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 2:56 pm

The Washington Post  has released more of the information it received from the fugitive National Security Agency (NSA) leaker Edward Snowden.

The Post reports that an internal audit, the NSA found it had violated privacy rules thousands of times.

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WRKF
1:40 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Treatments for Blood Cancers Proliferate

Dr. Robert Emmons of the Ochsner Blood Cancers and Stem Cell Transplant Program says it's an exciting time for blood cancer treatment, with many new drugs and sources for stem cells.


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Latest News
7:00 am
Tue July 30, 2013

This Summer's Gulf Dead Zone Smaller Than Feared

2013 Gulf of Mexico dead zone map.
Credit Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium

The low-oxygen dead zone this summer in the Gulf of Mexico is smaller than scientists had predicted. But the area where marine life can’t live is still about the size of Connecticut.

Nancy Rabalais of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium — called LUMCON — expected the gulf dead zone to be bigger, based on the level of nutrients measured in the Mississippi River.

Those nutrients come from fertilizer, used on crops upriver, that is carried downstream.

But choppy weather churned up the water, so the dead zone wasn’t as big as feared.

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Red River Radio
10:17 am
Tue July 16, 2013

American Cancer Society in Shreveport seeks hundreds of study participants

The American Cancer Society aims to recruit 500 people from the Ark-La-Tex to participate in the third generation of a cancer prevention study that first began in the 1960s. The organization has partnered with the YMCA in Shreveport and two other organizations to host sign-up events for the study. It involves taking an initial waist measurement and drawing a small blood sample. 

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