science

S Vivek / Flickr

Amateur astronomers and sky-watchers are in for a treat Wednesday morning.

A rare total lunar eclipse will happen at 5:27 a.m.

Louisiana Tech astronomer Lee Sawyer tells WWL that viewers in New Orleans will have a prime viewing experience.

Sawyer says the moon will glow blood red during the early morning event.

He also says this eclipse is unique because the sun will be rising in the east at the same time, giving viewers between 2-9 minutes to simultaneously see the sun rising in the east, and the eclipsed moon setting in the west.

WEFTEC

The Water Environment Federation’s Annual Technical Exhibition and Conference kicked off this past Saturday in New Orleans, and continues through Wednesday, October 1. On Monday afternoon, a new report called "Navigating to New Shores: Seizing the Future for Sustainable and Resilient U.S. Freshwater Resources" was released at the Morial Convention Center.

G. Reid Wiseman / NASA

G. Reid Wiseman, a NASA astronaut currently serving aboard the International Space Station as the mission's flight engineer, is known for his frequent Twitter photo posts of the Earth below.

Researchers at LSU Health Shreveport and Louisiana Tech University in Ruston are in the early stages of developing a new way to deliver antibiotics and other medicine via customized, implantable devices created using a 3-D printer. 

LSU Medical School student Jeffery Weisman is also pursuing his doctorate in biomedical engineering from Louisiana Tech. He presented his research in collaboration with LSU Health Shreveport. It intensified over the past three months when he experimented with making plastic medical prototypes from a consumer-grade 3-D printer.

Sergey Uryadnikov / Shutterstock.com

A Tulane expert in viral epidemics raging in West Africa says it’s time to expand experimental treatments. Some are showing promise.

Plaquemines Parish

Plaquemines Parish officials are partnering with the Army Corps of Engineers on a new coastal dredging initiative.

The plan is to use sediment dredged from the Mississippi River shipping channel to create 300 to 600 acres of marsh habitat. This will help create a natural buffer against storm surge.

Colonel Rick Hansen is commander of the New Orleans District office of the Army Corps of Engineers.

Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium

A scientist who has studied the low-oxygen dead zone off the Louisiana coast for 30 years says it’s still about the size of Connecticut.

Nancy Rabalais of Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium says it covers just over 5,000 square miles.

That’s triple the goal set by federal officials for next year. 

“The average size is now three times larger than the goal," she said. "And the goal was to reach that size by 2015, and it’s 2014. So that should tell us something about progress.”  

Top academics and practitioners in the field of environmental restoration are in New Orleans this week, meeting as part of the 2014 Conference of Ecological and Ecosystem Restoration.

Experts will be sharing coastal restoration examples from the Gulf of Mexico to the Persian Gulf, from Southeast Asia's Mekong Delta to the Mississippi Delta.

Allen Shimada / Wikimedia

Some studies have found a one in three chance that the fish on our restaurant plates or in the seafood case at the supermarket is mislabeled. A cheaper fish like tilapia may be sold as red snapper, for example.

Cheryl delPozzal / It's New Orleans

New Orleans DNA research companies Renaissance RX and GenoVive are changing our concept of dieting and medication.

GenoVive founder Victor Castellon joins Peter Ricchiuti on Out to Lunch to explain how specific DNA-based diet and exercise programs can target your unique metabolism to be effective from the very first day you start your personal weight loss and health improvement program.

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