science

Shots - Health News
12:19 pm
Fri August 30, 2013

Sleeping Pills Most Popular With Older People, Women

The proportion of people in different age groups who have taken sleeping pills in the past 30 days.
CDC

Originally published on Tue September 3, 2013 7:57 am

If you've had problems sleeping and have taken a pill to help, you're not alone.

About 9 million American adults had taken sleeping pills in the past month, according to findings from a detailed nationwide survey conducted between 2005 and 2010.

Overall, about 4 percent of people 20 and older had taken sleeping pills in the last 30 days, says the report from the National Center for Health Statistics.

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Latest News
7:00 am
Thu August 29, 2013

Governor Jindal Slams BP As Gulf Coast Restoration Plan Is Approved

A general blueprint is approved by the Gulf Coast Ecosystem Restoration Council.

Five states and leaders of several federal agencies have unanimously approved a blueprint to repair the Gulf of Mexico with BP fines pending over the 2010 oil spill. Governor Bobby Jindal’s comments in New Orleans about BP and his support for Mississippi River diversions drew immediate criticism.

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National Security
8:10 pm
Sat August 17, 2013

Leaked NSA Audit Shows It Violated Privacy Rules

Originally published on Fri August 16, 2013 2:56 pm

The Washington Post  has released more of the information it received from the fugitive National Security Agency (NSA) leaker Edward Snowden.

The Post reports that an internal audit, the NSA found it had violated privacy rules thousands of times.

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WRKF
1:40 pm
Sun August 11, 2013

Treatments for Blood Cancers Proliferate

Dr. Robert Emmons of the Ochsner Blood Cancers and Stem Cell Transplant Program says it's an exciting time for blood cancer treatment, with many new drugs and sources for stem cells.

Dr. Robert Emmons, Director of Hematologic Malignancy and Bone Marrow Transplant

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Latest News
7:00 am
Tue July 30, 2013

This Summer's Gulf Dead Zone Smaller Than Feared

2013 Gulf of Mexico dead zone map.
Credit Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium

The low-oxygen dead zone this summer in the Gulf of Mexico is smaller than scientists had predicted. But the area where marine life can’t live is still about the size of Connecticut.

Nancy Rabalais of the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium — called LUMCON — expected the gulf dead zone to be bigger, based on the level of nutrients measured in the Mississippi River.

Those nutrients come from fertilizer, used on crops upriver, that is carried downstream.

But choppy weather churned up the water, so the dead zone wasn’t as big as feared.

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Red River Radio
10:17 am
Tue July 16, 2013

American Cancer Society in Shreveport seeks hundreds of study participants

The American Cancer Society aims to recruit 500 people from the Ark-La-Tex to participate in the third generation of a cancer prevention study that first began in the 1960s. The organization has partnered with the YMCA in Shreveport and two other organizations to host sign-up events for the study. It involves taking an initial waist measurement and drawing a small blood sample. 

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WRKF
5:32 am
Tue July 16, 2013

Why Finding Oil in Fish Organs Isn't as Bad as it Looks

Kelly Connelly, WRKF

Originally published on Fri October 18, 2013 12:26 am

Environmental remediation scientists at LSU’s School of the Coast and Environment have found remnants of crude oil in the hearts of pogy that live off Grand Isle.

Pogy, a baitfish more officially called menhaden, make up the second largest commercial catch in the United States. They’re not only resold as baitfish, but they’re also processed into fish oil and fish meal, making their way into vitamins, cosmetics and livestock feeds.

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Science & Health
7:00 am
Fri July 12, 2013

Tulane Researchers Using BP Grant To Develop Less-Toxic Dispersant

A C-130 Hercules from the Air Force Reserve Command's 910th Airlift Wing drops an oil-dispersing chemical into the Gulf of Mexico May 5, 2010, as part of the Deepwater Horizon response effort.
Technical Sergeant Adrian Cadiz US Air Force

Tulane chemistry professor Scott Grayson reviews the grant objectives.

Researchers at Tulane University are working on designing a less toxic oil dispersant than the Corexit used on the BP spill in 2010. The goal is using ingredients now approved for human consumption.

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Latest News
3:28 pm
Tue June 4, 2013

Submarine Visit Canceled

Organizers have canceled Wednesday's display in New Orleans of the submarine that director James Cameron took to the deepest part of the ocean.

The Deepsea Challenger was set for public viewing outside the Audubon Aquarium, but a spokesman for the group transporting the submersible says traffic and space limitations made the one-day visit impossible.

The vehicle was driven by Cameron last year to the bottom of the Mariana trench in the western Pacific.

It’s on its way to the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute.

Latest News
7:00 am
Tue June 4, 2013

James Cameron's Solo Submarine Heads To New Orleans

The mini-submarine that director James Cameron used to explore the bottom of the sea will be on display Wednesday in New Orleans.

The Deepsea Challenger will be on the plaza outside the Audubon Aquarium from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Scientists will be at the display to explain the submersible’s technology.

Cameron operated the sub by himself. He went more than 35,700 feet under the surface of the western Pacific in March last year — and was able to stay there for three hours.

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