science

Thousands of fish were killed by a red tide along Southwest Florida's Gulf Coast during a 2002 bloom. Red tide blooms can wreak havoc on local communities dealing with tourism losses or the cost of cleanup.
Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (GCOOS-RA)

The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association has released a new plan that will help protect humans and marine life from certain toxins. It sounds like the title of this holiday season’s biggest horror film at the box office -- The attack of the Harmful Algal Bloom!

Louisiana Sea Grant College Program at Louisiana State University

The state is bringing back its program to test fish for mercury, a heavy metal that is dangerous for human consumption. The program will be back up and running in January.

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality scaled back the program in 2008, when it ran out of funding.

Mercury comes from burning coal and other industrial activities. It gets into the air and then settles in streams and other waters, where fish absorb it.

Tulane University researchers are leading a study examining the long-term effects of Hurricane Katrina. The national project will examine the health effects of the storm, who came back, and where they are now.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers / http://www.mvn.usace.army.mil

Staving off coastal land loss in Louisiana will take lots of money and lots of manpower. In just the next four years, GNO Inc. expects up to 12,000 new jobs in the so-called “water sector,” like coastal restoration managers and mathematicians who can model water flow.

 

But there are not enough workers in the region with the skills to fill those jobs. The new University of New Orleans certificate in Coastal Engineering and Science aims to remedy that.

Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority / http://cims.coastal.louisiana.gov/FLOODRISK/

Entrepreneurs and businesspeople met at the New Orleans business incubator Propeller on Thursday night to learn about how they can help restore the coast.

U.S. Coast Guard

The National Science Foundation will spend nearly half a million dollars to help a University of New Orleans chemistry professor study sunlight and oil spills. WWNO reporter Tegan Wendland had a conversation with UNO chemistry professor Matthew Tarr.

Tarr wants to better understand how the sun breaks down oil on the water’s surface.

National Geographic

A Tulane professor was part of an international team that discovered and documented a new species of human ancestors found in South Africa. It’s the largest find of human-related fossils ever made in Africa.

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

2005 Hurricane Season Still Most Active on Record

Aug 24, 2015

Ten years later, the 2005 hurricane season remains the most active on record.

Barry Keim, Louisiana’s state climatologist, says that in 2005, “The sea surface temperatures were off the charts.” Keim explains that hurricanes need warm water to develop. The warmer the water, the stronger hurricanes can potentially become.

There were 28 named storms in 2005. “It was a crazy year,” Keim says. The last storm of the season, Tropical Storm Zeta, formed on December 30th—a full month after what should have been the end of hurricane season.

ULM Unveils Asbestos Analysis Lab

Jun 5, 2015

The University of Louisiana at Monroe has opened an asbestos testing lab on campus.  ULM President Dr. Nick Bruno says the Asbestos Analysis Lab can improve environmental concerns through specialized testing.  

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