science

Nick Janzen

The Gulf Intracoastal Waterway is a shipping canal that runs over 1,000 miles from Texas to Florida. But in Lafourche Parish, it’s become more than an industrial throughway. It's a battle line against coastal erosion, and experts are determined to keep saltwater out of it.

Tegan Wendland / WWNO

The international climate talks wrapped up in Paris this weekend as the United Nations parties finalized an agreement to stave off climate change. The terms of the agreement call for limiting global temperature rise to around 1.5 degrees Celsius, well below the initial goal of 2 degrees.

WWNO’s Tegan Wendland talked with Bob Thomas, professor and director of Loyola’s center for environmental communication, about whether it will make a difference.

Audubon

The Audubon Society is asking for volunteers to take part in its annual Christmas Bird Count. The information gathered by these citizen-scientists over the past 116 years has helps researchers determine how bird populations are faring across the country.

A new study involving a Tulane expert on child psychology shows that quality foster care can help reverse damage done to abused boys. Without the intervention, children can become callous and unemotional.

Thousands of fish were killed by a red tide along Southwest Florida's Gulf Coast during a 2002 bloom. Red tide blooms can wreak havoc on local communities dealing with tourism losses or the cost of cleanup.
Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association (GCOOS-RA)

The Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System Regional Association has released a new plan that will help protect humans and marine life from certain toxins. It sounds like the title of this holiday season’s biggest horror film at the box office -- The attack of the Harmful Algal Bloom!

Louisiana Sea Grant College Program at Louisiana State University

The state is bringing back its program to test fish for mercury, a heavy metal that is dangerous for human consumption. The program will be back up and running in January.

The Louisiana Department of Environmental Quality scaled back the program in 2008, when it ran out of funding.

Mercury comes from burning coal and other industrial activities. It gets into the air and then settles in streams and other waters, where fish absorb it.

Tulane University researchers are leading a study examining the long-term effects of Hurricane Katrina. The national project will examine the health effects of the storm, who came back, and where they are now.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers / http://www.mvn.usace.army.mil

Staving off coastal land loss in Louisiana will take lots of money and lots of manpower. In just the next four years, GNO Inc. expects up to 12,000 new jobs in the so-called “water sector,” like coastal restoration managers and mathematicians who can model water flow.

 

But there are not enough workers in the region with the skills to fill those jobs. The new University of New Orleans certificate in Coastal Engineering and Science aims to remedy that.

Coastal Protection and Restoration Authority / http://cims.coastal.louisiana.gov/FLOODRISK/

Entrepreneurs and businesspeople met at the New Orleans business incubator Propeller on Thursday night to learn about how they can help restore the coast.

U.S. Coast Guard

The National Science Foundation will spend nearly half a million dollars to help a University of New Orleans chemistry professor study sunlight and oil spills. WWNO reporter Tegan Wendland had a conversation with UNO chemistry professor Matthew Tarr.

Tarr wants to better understand how the sun breaks down oil on the water’s surface.

Pages