science

Total Solar Eclipse Crosses The U.S.

Aug 21, 2017

It is indeed dark during the day as a total solar eclipse makes its way from Oregon to South Carolina. Eleven states are in the path of total darkness. Follow the astronomical phenomenon's journey across America along with NPR journalists and others experiencing the eclipse.

Loading...

Mark Pellegrini / Wikimedia Commons

If it’s Mother’s Day, it must be termite swarm season. Few people know this fact better than Zack Lemann. He is the chief entomologist at the Audubon Butterfly Garden and Insectarium, where he indulges his lifelong love of New Orleans and all of its six-legged denizens. So why does he live, breath and yes, even eat insects? NolaVie’s Renée Peck met with Zack to find out.   

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by Renée Peck.

Pontchartrain Astronomy Society

Even from the light-polluted glare of New Orleans, it’s still possible to look up from time to time at the night’s sky and catch a star. NolaVie’s David Benedetto sat down with experienced stargazer and president of the Pontchartrain Astronomy Society, Barry Simon.

Visit NolaVie's website for a related article written by David Benedetto.  

Scientists announced Wednesday that they have once again detected ripples in space and time from two black holes colliding far away in the universe.

The discovery comes just months after the first-ever detection of such "gravitational waves," and it suggests that smaller-sized black holes might be more numerous than many had thought.

Peter Ricchiuti, Lowry Curley and Patricia Maher.
Alison Moon / It's New Orleans

As you know, statistics can be twisted to mean anything we want. How about this computation? If every one of the 9 million tourists who visit New Orleans was to visit one of the 400,000 locals, you’d only have 23 visitors a year. You’ve probably had more folks than that over to watch a Saints game, right?

Two New Orleans revolutionaries, Patricia Maher and Lowry Curley, join Peter Ricchiuti for a fascinating look at a New Orleans that seems to be changing faster and more radically than ever.

Bob Marshall / The Lens

The recent outbreak of the Zika virus has New Orleans on edge. The Gulf Coast is considered the most vulnerable part of the U.S. Mayor Mitch Landrieu has asked Congress for money to fight Zika, as the city continues local efforts to understand the mosquito-borne disease.

NASA and the Hubble Space Telescope Orion Treasury Project Team

New Orleans astronomy buffs have a new place to take in the wonders of outer space. The Tulane Observatory will now be open to the public once a month. Renee Peck recently spoke with Dr. Dan Purrington, Professor Emeritus of Physics, about this new opportunity to view the skies.

As health officials around the world study how the Zika virus is spreading, a Tulane researcher says New Orleans has some extra time to prepare.

Zoe Hughes / University of New Orleans

A professor at the University of New Orleans has received a grant to study marshes. The research will compare wetlands in Louisiana with those on the east coast.

An effective and non-addictive painkiller has been developed by researchers at Tulane University with the Southeast Louisiana Veterans Health Care System. The new compound has been in the works since a 1997 discovery of a brain receptor.

Pages