science

WRKF
2:43 pm
Mon April 13, 2015

Old Cancer Drug, New Formula

Professor Zhijun Liu


For the past eight years, Professor Zhijun Liu of LSU’s AgCenter has been focusing on a chemotherapy drug called Taxol, used to treat ovarian and breast cancer.  It’s a potent drug, and the body struggles to dissolve and absorb it.  Liu is looking for ways to fix that.

 

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Red River Radio
9:07 am
Thu March 26, 2015

Sci-Port in Shreveport grooms future scientists in Science Academy

Science Academy students prepare poster presentations as they wrap up this year's program and present what they learned about space.

For a decade, Sci-Port: Louisiana’s Science Center in Shreveport has hosted Science Academy, bussing dozens of elementary school students to the science museum for seven weeks. They get an extra boost of science and math skills, according to Sci-Port’s education coordinator Kim Solice.

“I think it’s a bonus for these students. These are students who I think have real interest in science, and they will continue that interest in their middle and high school years. Eventually, what we hope is it will become a career for them,” Solice said.

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WRKF
3:20 pm
Mon March 23, 2015

Dozens of Genetic Markers Contribute to Obesity

Inside the Human Genomics Lab at Pennington Biomedical Research Center, Dr. Tuomo Rankinen points to a chip -- much like one you'd find in a computer -- that contains DNA samples. The chips are designed to read genetic markers, or DNA sequences, that determine things like blood type and eye color, and also risk for diseases like obesity. 

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Coastal Desk
5:42 pm
Mon March 16, 2015

Tulane University Gets Grant To Help Coastal Communities Prepare For Future Oil Spills

The oil slick as seen from space by NASA's Terra satellite on 24 May 2010
Credit NASA / Wikimedia Commons

The Disaster Resilience Leadership Academy at Tulane University received $1.4 million from the BP Gulf of Mexico Research Initiative to fund research about impacts of the 2010 oil spill in Louisiana and Alabama. 

This three year program will focus on three coastal communities. Two areas in Louisiana and one in Alabama will be selected to study the impact of the oil spill.

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Business & Technology
12:15 pm
Fri February 27, 2015

UNO Professor Teaches Computers The Human Art Of Storytelling

UNO professor Stephen Ware received a grant from the National Science Foundation to create artificial intelligence systems that integrate computer reasoning with the human art of storytelling.
A Health Blog Flickr

University of New Orleans computer science professor Stephen Ware is the recipient of a two-year $138,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to create artificial intelligence systems that integrate computer reasoning with the human art of storytelling.

WWNO’s Tech & Innovation Reporter Janaya Williams recently spoke with Ware about his Narrative Intelligence Lab at UNO, and the challenge of teaching computers how to “think” more like human beings.

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Science & Health
11:27 am
Fri February 27, 2015

Rapid Ebola Test Developed At Tulane University Gains FDA Approval

Tulane University researchers helped discover a new rapid diagnostic test for the Ebola virus. The test gained FDA approval this week.
UNMEER Flickr

This week, the Food and Drug Administration gave its stamp of approval to a new rapid test to detect the Ebola virus. The test is based on technology originally discovered at Tulane University.

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Features
3:03 pm
Mon February 23, 2015

'Rock Star Nurse' Fights Ebola

Yanti Turang is an indie rock singer-turned-nurse and founder of Learn to Live. (learntoliveglobal.org)

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 9:31 am

As the threat of Ebola has left the U.S. and the story has left the headlines, people are still heading over to West Africa to fight the virus that has claimed nearly 10,000 lives.

Yanti Turang is one of those going. The indie rock band singer-turned-nurse and founder of the nonprofit LearnToLive is heading to Sierra Leone to help save lives.

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WRKF
11:11 am
Mon February 23, 2015

To Understand How the Brain Ages, Researcher Looks at the Heart

The size of a normal brain compared to one with Alzheimer's Disease

The MRI machine in Dr. Owen Carmichael's lab blares as it scans a subject's brain.  Carmichael, Director of Biomedical Imaging at Pennington Research Center, studies those scans trying to understand how the brain ages.

Carmichael explains that "what you'll see on the MRI scan is the amount of brain tissue.  And all of that brain tissue is part of that electrical circuitry that makes it possible for you to think."  As we age, our brains tend to shrink.  And as that tissue goes away, the harder it becomes to think.

He describes the young brain as a grape that's just been pulled from the vine, while "the elderly brain looks more like a raisin, in that it's deflated and smaller in size.  And the person with Alzheimer's, that 'looking like a grape' goes even further, it's extremely shriveled up."

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Features
4:12 pm
Thu January 15, 2015

Tulane Researchers Looking For Environmental Clues In Mockingbirds' Songs

Researchers at Tulane University are experimenting with a new way to test for lead exposure — by listening to mockingbird songs to find out what they can tell us about heavy metals in the environment.
Madhusudan Katti Flickr

Elevated lead levels in the environment can cause a number of health problems for children and adults, and parts of New Orleans have consistently tested high for lead pollution.

Researchers at Tulane University are experimenting with a new way to test for lead exposure — by listening to bird songs to find out what they can tell us about heavy metals in the environment. 

Tulane researcher Renata Ribeiro spends a lot of time out in the field, recording the songs of Northern Mockingbirds.

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Science & Health
12:07 pm
Fri January 9, 2015

Triple Degree Program At LSU Serves The Growing Biomedical Industry In Louisiana

A new triple degree program launches in the fall at LSU, for students who want to fast-track undergraduate education, medical school and PhD study.
dullhunk Flickr

A new triple degree program launches in the fall at LSU, for students who want to fast-track undergraduate education, medical school and PhD study. 

LSU is partnering with the Health Sciences Center in New Orleans to launch the program. It’s called “Fast Path” because students would receive three degrees  - a bachelor of science, an MD, and a PhD — in one-to-three years less than the traditional path.

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