schools

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Last month the Southern Poverty Law Center, Louisiana Department of Education, State School Board, and Orleans Parish School Board reached a settlement on a four-year-old lawsuit. The suit claimed New Orleans schools weren't effectively serving students with disabilities — something that's harder to monitor and track in the charter school landscape.

It's National School Choice Week — a week aimed at showcasing school options across the country. Here in New Orleans, families are exploring choices as the school application deadline draws near.

With the deadline a month away, families can draw on several resources to learn more about schools.

This month, as high school seniors apply for financial aid, we focus our Voices of Educators series on a college counselor.

Sheena Reed is Director of College Counseling at Sci Academy. She draws on her own experiences - as a first generation college student and college admissions officer — to guide her students.

Do you know a great teacher to include in our Voices of Educators series? Send us an email: comments@wwno.org

Support for Voices of Educators and education news on WWNO comes from Entergy Corporation.

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In New Orleans, 9 out of ten students go to charter schools. How do they, and their families, choose those schools? A new report out today finds that families weigh many factors. Practical concerns may count as much as, or even more than, a school’s academic standing.

The charter school movement is built on the premise that increased competition among schools will sort the wheat from the chaff.

It seems self-evident that parents, empowered by choice, will vote with their feet for academically stronger schools. As the argument goes, the overall effect should be to improve equity as well: Lower-income parents won't have to send their kids to an under-resourced and underperforming school just because it is the closest one to them geographically.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

Early childhood education got a boost last week. The federal government pledged $32 million to fund Louisiana pre-schools. 

In this month's Voices of Educators series, we look at an early childhood teacher. 

Kwanza Wells teaches at Catholic Charities St. John the Baptist Head Start, one of more than 30 Head Start centers in New Orleans. She helps students develop critical skills to succeed in kindergarten and the world.

US Secretary of Education Arne Duncan addressed the annual lunch for the nonprofit Bureau of Governmental Research on Thursday.

He called New Orleans an example for the nation in school innovation, and cited a long list of statistics in achievement improvements since 2005. Then, 60 percent of students attended a failing school, while that number has dropped to 5 percent today.

Duncan noted that New Orleanians, more than most, know the pain that comes with drastic school change. In the battle for better public education, he said, "you are absolutely winning."

Today, for the first time, a charter school board voted to transfer from the Recovery School District back to the Orleans Parish School Board.

When the Recovery School District was created in 2003, the directive was clear: take over failing schools, turn them around, then transfer them back to the Orleans Parish School Board.

But now charter school boards decide whether to transfer to local control or stay in the state-run RSD. Until now, no eligible schools have returned to OPSB.

Mallory Falk / WWNO

This weekend New Orleans voters decide whether to extend and redirect a property tax to fund school maintenance. The measure seems simple: set aside money so schools don't fall into disrepair. But the millage vote reflects a power struggle in New Orleans schools.

Last month, a banner started appearing outside schools. It features a racially diverse group of kids, with crisp jeans and wide smiles. Each gives a big thumbs up. The accompanying text: Our children, our schools. Not a tax increase. Vote December 6.

School buildings in the Crescent City will become monuments to our differences instead of the beacons of learning they are supposed to be if New Orleanians reject a preservation program for educational facilities in the voting booth on Dec. 6.

It’s a funding conflict that mirrors power disputes around the country over whether the states, or local, elected boards should control schools.

Anything but a vote to pass the measure ignores what New Orleans children went through before and immediately after Hurricane Katrina.

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