Restore Act

Justin Stumberg / U.S. military

The US Treasury Department announced yesterday that Gulf Coast state and local governments can finally submit proposals and apply for RESTORE Act funds. This opens up grants to support communities impacted by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.  

Some of the $653 million in civil penalties that came out of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill are now available. 35 percent of that money will be divided equally among the five states of Florida, Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi and Texas. 20 coastal parishes in Louisiana qualify for the funds.

The Louisiana Coast: Last Call — The RESTORE Act

Oct 7, 2013
NOAA Photo Library

The second part of a trial resumed in the Federal District Court here in New Orleans this month to decide just how much BP will pay for polluting the Gulf of Mexico and Louisiana during the Deepwater Horizon spill back in 2010.

Louisiana Democratic Senator Mary Landrieu is visiting coastal areas today to mark passage of the Restore Act. Exactly how much money the state can expect from BP fines is still being worked out.

Legislation assigning 80 percent of BP’s Clean Water Act fines to Gulf Coast states most affected by its oil spill has been approved by Congress. The landmark legislation included in the Transportation Bill is expected to mean billions of dollars for Louisiana.

Two years after the deadly Deepwater Horizon explosion, Louisiana’s Democratic Senator Mary Landrieu says the recovery has been slow. The senator receives hundreds of calls a month reporting troubles still caused by the BP oil spill.

Louisiana Senator Mary Landrieu is applauding the Senate’s passage of the Restore Act, which designates 80 percent of Clean Water Act fines from the BP oil spill to the five Gulf states.